News / USA

Suspected Gunman in Deadly Washington Shooting Acted Alone

Police cars line the gate in the early morning as essential personnel only are allowed into a closed Washington Navy Yard in Washington, Sept. 17, 2013.
Police cars line the gate in the early morning as essential personnel only are allowed into a closed Washington Navy Yard in Washington, Sept. 17, 2013.
VOA News
Authorities in Washington, D.C. say an information technology employee working for a military contractor was the lone suspect in Monday's shooting rampage at a U.S. naval facility that left 13 people dead, including the gunman.

Washington Police Chief Cathy Lanier told reporters hours after the tragedy there was no evidence a second person was involved with Aaron Alexis, a 34-year-old resident of Fort Worth, Texas, who was killed during a gun battle with police shortly after his shooting spree began.

Police say Alexis entered the U.S. Naval Yard in the nation's capital with a valid identification card, and was armed with at least one firearm. He then opened fire inside the Naval Sea Systems Command, which is responsible for buying, building and maintaining ships and submarines. About 3,000 people work in the building, many of them civilians.

The New York City native served in the U.S. Navy as a reserve sailor from 2007 to 2011. News outlets say Alexis was arrested in two separate shooting incidents, with one taking place in 2004 in Seattle and a second in Fort Worth in 2010. He has been described as having problems controlling his anger.

Washington Mayor Vincent Gray said that eight people were hurt in addition to the dead in Monday's incident. All the injured are expected to survive. Mr. Gray said there was no apparent motive behind the shooting.

Police released the identities of those killed late Monday night, with their ages ranging from the late 40s to the early 70s.

Related video report by Chris Simkins

Shooting Rampage Leaves 13 Dead at DC Navy Yardi
X
September 17, 2013 12:59 AM
Twelve people are dead and several others wounded after a lone gunman went on shooting rampage at a U.S. Navy facility in Washington Monday. Law enforcement agencies in the nation's capital responded quickly to the scene, killing the gunman after a large-scale search at the base. VOA's Chris Simkins has more on the story.
As night fell in the nation's capital, grieving residents gathered outside the Naval Yard and held a silent candlelight vigil. The complex is in a residential area close to the U.S. Capitol. People in the neighborhood had been ordered to stay in their homes and offices as police searched earlier for a possible second gunman. A number of schools and U.S. Senate offices were locked down during the day Monday.

Monday night's baseball game between the Atlanta Braves and the host Washington Nationals at a nearby stadium also was canceled.

U.S. President Barack Obama has ordered all flags across the country to fly at half-staff through sunset Friday to honor the victims. During an event at the White House Monday, Obama lamented yet another mass shooting, which he called a "cowardly act.''

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by: Doris from: USA
September 17, 2013 10:47 AM
Obama, what about our country's "COWARDLY ACTS" of killing people with drones, calling them "terrorists", but yet we FUND, ARM, and TRAIN them?!?!?

by: Mrs. Condon from: USA
September 17, 2013 10:10 AM
VOA, whoever wrote this biased article needs to go back to Journalism101 school. Why no mention of the FACT that the shooter was on PHARMACEUTICAL DRUGS????????? WHY??

by: Iwork@BIGPHARM from: USA
September 17, 2013 9:56 AM
With well over 50% of people on pharmaceutical drugs, and a direct link to the Navy Shooter on these drugs, perhaps we should be locking up Corporate goons at BIG PHARM instead of taking away peoples constitutional rights, am I making any sense, DIANE FEINSTEIN?? GUNS DON'T KILL, PEOPLE DO.

by: No Propaganda from: London
September 17, 2013 9:34 AM
The Washington Navy Yard gunman Aaron Alexis played violent video games including Call of Duty for up to 16 hours at a time and friends believe it could have pushed him towards becoming a mass murderer.



Alexis, 34, who was shot dead on Monday after killing 13 people at Washington’s Navy Yard, also carried a .45 handgun tucked in his trousers with no holster “everywhere he went” because he believed people would try to steal his belongings.

He also felt racially discriminated against, and believed he had been financially “screwed” over a contracting job in Japan at the end of last year, friends said.

The addiction to violent video games and guns was at odds with his devout commitment to Buddhism, which saw Alexis spending half the day every Sunday meditating at the Wat Busayadhammvanaram temple in Fort Worth, Texas over a period of several years. He also spent a month in Thailand in April, The Daily Telegraph can disclose.

by: riano baggy from: indonesia
September 17, 2013 6:28 AM
With my deepest sympathy to the victim's family, These moments again and again. US government fail to protect their citizens. they must a tight ban and control everyone who have guns or rifle. Maybe cooperation with psychology association and homeland security. and police department for someone to buy arm rifles or guns. Someone have bad records or unstable mentally must deprived license to bear guns or rifles.

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