News / Middle East

Fighting Between Iraqi Forces, Militants Kills 34

Tribal fighters aligned with government forces are seen patrolling the streets in the city of Falluja, 50 km west of Baghdad Jan. 5, 2014.Tribal fighters aligned with government forces are seen patrolling the streets in the city of Falluja, 50 km west of Baghdad Jan. 5, 2014.
x
Tribal fighters aligned with government forces are seen patrolling the streets in the city of Falluja, 50 km west of Baghdad Jan. 5, 2014.
Tribal fighters aligned with government forces are seen patrolling the streets in the city of Falluja, 50 km west of Baghdad Jan. 5, 2014.
VOA News
Fighting between Iraqi forces and al-Qaida-linked militants who seized control of two western cities has killed at least 34 people and wounded 58.
 
Iraqi officials say government forces launched an air strike on Ramadi Sunday. But residents say it has been quiet since late Saturday in Fallujah.
 
Pro-Sunni and pro-al-Qaida militants took over both cities last week. They have been fending off government forces and allied tribal fighters, including some Sunnis who oppose the militants.
 
Lieutenant General Rasheed Fleih, who leads the Anbar Military Command, says it will take a few days for government forces to retake the two cities.
 
Also Sunday, separate car bombs killed at least 19 people in Baghdad.
 
Violence between Iraq's Shi'ite-led government and the Sunni minority has killed thousands over the last year.
 
Sunnis accuse the government of ignoring their needs and marginalizing them politically. Iraqi official accuse the Sunnis of involvement in terrorism.
 
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Sunday that the United States will provide assistance to Iraqi forces in their battle against the pro-al-Qaida militants, but, in a reference to the Iraqi government, stressed that it is "their fight."
 
Kerry said there are no plans of sending U.S. ground troops back into Iraq.

You May Like

For Lebanon-based Refugees, Desperation Fuels Perilous Passage

In a war that has caused an estimated three million people to flee Syria, efforts to make perilous sea journey in search of asylum expected to increase More

South African Brewer Tackles Climate Change

Mega-brewer SAB Miller sent delegates to climate summit in Peru, says it is one of many private companies taking their own steps to fight climate change More

Indonesia Reports Increase in Citizens Joining Islamic State

Officials say more than 350 of its citizens are now in Syria or Iraq to fight with Islamic State - 50 more than last month More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: MikeBarnett from: USA
January 06, 2014 4:26 PM
Providing arms to Prime Minister Maliki is the correct path since his is the elected government. Further, he fights al Qaeda that attacked the US on 9-11-2001. Al Qaeda is a Sunni group, and Iraq is two thirds Shia, so Iraq's government won't aid al Qaeda. Those who live in the region should fight their battles, if necessary, but the US can provide arms to those who are not US enemies, especially if they fight US enemies.


by: Taiji Robinhood
January 06, 2014 5:50 AM
This is a great American heritage of invading Iraq. So many people lost their lives since the American invasion which has caused the distability in the Middle East region.


by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
January 05, 2014 8:47 PM
Are the Sunnis and the al-Qaeda better than the Shiites and the
and the Iranians in Iraq? When Saddam was in power, it was the hegemony of the Sunnis. After the withdrawal of the US, it is the hegemony of the Shiites. The US should have divided Iraq into three countries (!) the Shiites in the south, (2) the Sunnis in the middle, and the (3) Kurdish in the north. If the division of Iraq has happened after deposing Sadam Husein, all the present terrorism and bloodshed in Iraq should have subsided. The ethnic fighting in Iraq will continue as these opposing factions cannot find a common ground for peace in Iraq. The US will support the fight against al Qaeda, but will destroy the trust of the Sunnis, perpetuating the ethnic struggle in Iraq.


by: Sunny Enwerem from: Abeokuta Nigeria
January 05, 2014 12:58 PM
I oppose any US assistance to the government of Mr Malike ,him and his supporters anticipated such a challenge yet refused to sign an agreement which clearly makes him unwise and unfit to govern,I see KARMA calling on his indirect assistance to Iran and Assad.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Refugees Living in Kenya Long for Peace in the Home Countriesi
X
December 16, 2014 2:14 PM
Kenya is host to numerous refugees seeking safe haven from conflict. Immigrants from Somalia face challenges in their new lives in Kenya. Ahead of International Migrants Day (December 18) Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.
Video

Video Refugees Living in Kenya Long for Peace in the Home Countries

Kenya is host to numerous refugees seeking safe haven from conflict. Immigrants from Somalia face challenges in their new lives in Kenya. Ahead of International Migrants Day (December 18) Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.
Video

Video Turkey's Authoritarianism Dismays Western Allies

The Turkish government has been defiant in the face of criticism at home and abroad for its raids targeting opposition media. The European Union on Monday expressed dismay after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan lashed out at Brussels for criticizing his government's action. Turkey's bid to be considered for EU membership has been on hold while critics accuse the NATO ally of increasingly authoritarian rule. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video US-China Year in Review: Hong Kong to Climate Change

The United States is pushing for a code of conduct to resolve territorial disputes in the South China Sea as it works to improve commercial ties with Beijing. VOA State Department correspondent Scott Stearns reports on a year of U.S. policy toward China from Hong Kong to climate change.
Video

Video Japanese Leader’s Election Win Raises Potential for Conflict with Neighbors

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his allies easily won a two-thirds majority in parliament Sunday, even though the country has slipped into recession under his conservative policies. VOA’s Brian Padden reports from Seoul, that the prime minister’s victory will empower him to continue economic reforms but also pursue a nationalist agenda that will likely increase tensions with Japan’s neighbors.
Video

Video Nuba Mountain Families Hide in Caves to Escape Aerial Bombings

Despite ongoing peace talks between Sudan's government and the rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, or SPLM-N, daily aerial attacks continue in South Kordofan province’s Nuba Mountains. Adam Bailes was there and reports for VOA that government forces are targeting civilian areas, rather than military positions, with their daily bombardments.
Video

Video Indonesian Province to Expand Sharia Law

Indonesia has the world’s largest Muslim population and a legal system based on Dutch civil law and Indonesian government regulations. But in a 2001 compromise with separatists, Aceh province in Sumatra island’s north was allowed to implement Sharia law. Since then, religious justice has become increasingly strict. VOA correspondent Steve Herman reports from Banda Aceh.
Video

Video Some Russian Businesses Thrive in Poor Economy

Capital flight, the fall in oil prices and Western sanctions are pushing Russia's staggering economy into recession. But not companies are suffering. The ruble’s drop in value has benefited exporters as well as businesses targeting increasingly frugal customers. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.

All About America

AppleAndroid