News / Science & Technology

Big Bang Theory Scrutinized

  • The sun sets behind BICEP2 (in the foreground) and the South Pole Telescope (in the background).
  • The BICEP2 telescope's focal plane consists of 512 superconducting microwave detectors, developed and produced at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
  • The tiny temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (shown here as color) trace primordial density fluctuations in the early universe that seed the later growth of galaxies.
  • Gravitational waves from inflation generate a faint but distinctive twisting pattern in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, known as a 'curl' or B-mode pattern.
  • Graduate student Justus Brevik tests the BICEP2 readout electronics.

Scientists Hear Earliest Echoes of Big Bang

The universe expanded so fast in its first moments of existence that it left ripples in the fabric of space-time.

Or maybe it didn’t.

In a study that could explain what put the “bang” in the Big Bang, researchers say they have detected the remnants of gravitational waves that fluttered through the universe in an infinitesimally brief period after the Big Bang.

Albert Einstein predicted the existence of those waves in his theory of general relativity. If they exist, they would move scientists closer to a unified theory encompassing all the fundamental forces of the universe, from gravity to quantum physics.

When the results were first announced in March, experts said they were likely Nobel Prize-worthy if they held up to scrutiny.

Peer review

They had not, however, gone through the customary peer review process before publication in a scientific journal. When outside experts looked at the data, they suggested that interstellar dust could account for the findings.

“It’s an extraordinary result. It requires extraordinary scrutiny,” said Johns Hopkins University astronomer Marc Kamionkowski, who was not involved in the study.

The findings in question are now published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Working at a radio telescope at the South Pole, the researchers describe a twisting pattern in the background radiation of the universe. That radiation is the energy left over from the Big Bang nearly 14 billion years ago.

The twisting pattern is evidence of gravitational waves, the authors say, and they contend that the signal is likely too strong to be dust alone.

Other researchers are following up on the results with different instruments.

“We’ll have to wait six months, maybe a couple of years, until we have additional data,” Kamionkowski said. “If what they’re seeing really is gravitational waves, whatever uncertainty we have now should decay away.”

“This is the way science works,” he added. “Things are not true because somebody claims that they’re true. Things are true because different people make independent measurements and independently arrive at similar conclusions.”

And that is still a ways off, he said.

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by: joe o'connell from: Denver
June 23, 2014 10:35 PM
as usual ... further study is needed


by: Babu G. Ranganathan
June 22, 2014 9:25 PM
BIG HOLES IN BIG BANG THEORY

Big Bang scientists extrapolate a hypothetical scenario from a few facts. Yes, some galaxies are expanding, moving further away, but this is not the case with the entire universe. There are galaxies in the universe running perpendicular to the rest of the galaxies. That's contrary to Big Bang. If Big Bang really occurred, there should be a uniform distribution of gasses.

This uniform distribution of the gasses would have made sure that the gasses would not have coalesced, due to gravitational attraction, into planets and stars. The hypothesis of dark matter providing enough gravitational force has been recently discredited.

"The (galactic) structures discovered during the past few years, however, are so massive that even if CDM (Cold Dark Matter) did exist, it could not account for their formation" (Dr. Duane T. Gish, "The Big Bang Theory Collapses"). Furthermore, an explosion cannot explain the precise orbits and courses of thousands of billions of stars in thousands of billions of galaxies.

Some evolutionary astronomers believe that trillions of stars crashed into each other leaving surviving stars to find precise orderly orbits in space. Not only is this irrational, but if there was such a mass collision of stars then there would be a super mass residue of gas clouds in space to support this hypothesis. The present level of residue of gas clouds in space doesn't support the magnitude of star deaths required for such a hypothesis. And, as already stated, the origin of stars cannot be explained by the Big Bang because of the reasons mentioned above. It is one thing to say that stars may decay and die into random gas clouds, but it is totally different to say that gas clouds form into stars.

Most people don't realize how much disagreement there is among evolutionary scientists concerning their own theories. The media doesn't report those details, at least not to any substantial extent.

Read the Internet article, 'SMOKING GUN' PROOF OF BIG BANG ALREADY IN DOUBT by creationist and scientist Dr. Jake Hebert.

I encourage all to read my popular Internet articles: NATURAL LIMITS TO EVOLUTION and HOW FORENSIC SCIENCE REFUTES ATHEISM

Visit my newest Internet site: THE SCIENCE SUPPORTING CREATION

Babu G. Ranganathan*
(B.A. Bible/Biology)

Author of popular Internet article, TRADITIONAL DOCTRINE OF HELL EVOLVED FROM GREEK ROOTS

*I have given successful lectures (with question and answer period afterwards) defending creation before evolutionist science faculty and students at various colleges and universities. I've been privileged to be recognized in the 24th edition of Marquis "Who's Who in The East" for my writings on religion and science.


by: DavidKeller
June 21, 2014 1:02 AM
There was no big bang. God created everything 6000 years ago like the Bible says. Watch Kent Hovinds movies

In Response

by: Anonymous
June 23, 2014 4:30 PM
And who wrote the bible??? Still humans

In Response

by: Lee
June 23, 2014 4:10 PM
Faith is no excuse for willful ignorance.


by: Jraw from: Washington
June 21, 2014 12:20 AM
Literally, one of the worst pieces of journalism in the history of the world. Congratulations, you are now guilty of aiding and abetting deniers of basic science. How proud you must be.

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