News / USA

Korean Passenger Jet Crashes in San Francisco, 2 Dead

An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 rests on the tarmac after crash landing at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, California, July 6, 2013.
An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 rests on the tarmac after crash landing at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, California, July 6, 2013.
VOA News
An Asiana Airlines jet carrying more than 300 passengers and crew members crash-landed at the San Francisco airport Saturday, killing at least two people and injuring more than 180.

The flight originated in Shanghai, China, and stopped in the South Korean capital, Seoul, before heading to San Francisco in the western U.S. state of California.

Most of the people on board the Boeing 777 were Chinese, South Korean and U.S. nationals. The South Korean airline says the two people killed were Chinese passengers seated at the back of the plane. Both victims were reportedly teenage girls.

Witnesses say the plane's tail appeared to hit the runway first as it came in for landing. The tail broke off and the aircraft caught fire and appeared to bounce violently before coming to rest on the tarmac. Images of the plane in the aftermath of the crash showed it on the ground with its tail missing, much of the cabin burned through and debris scattered along the runway.

Teams of investigators have been sent to San Francisco to investigate the cause of the accident, which occurred in good weather.

No distress signal from the cockpit was issued before the crash, but some survivors have said they thought the plane was coming in too low. They say it felt like the pilot tried to fly up again before the plane hit the runway.

The CEO of Asiana Airlines, Yoon Young-doo, told a news conference Sunday the airline currently believes there were no mechanical problems with the plane or its engines at the time of the crash. He would not comment directly on whether pilot error may have caused the accident but said those in the cockpit had thousands of hours of experience.

Asiana is South Korea's second largest airline after national carrier Korean Air.

The investigation has been turned over to the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, which has said there is no indication the accident was linked to terrorism. The FBI will work with the National Transportation Safety Board, Korean investigators and Boeing as the probe unfolds.

White House officials said President Barack Obama's "thoughts and prayers go out to the families who lost a loved one and all those affected by the crash."

In 2008, a British Airways Boeing 777 jet crash-landed short of the runway at London's Heathrow Airport, but all on board survived.  Investigators attributed the crash to fuel blockages caused by ice particles that had formed during the plane's long flight from Beijing. The finding led to changes in the design of the Rolls-Royce engines used on some 777s.
 
Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

You May Like

University of Michigan Wins Solar Car Race

Squad guided its student-designed solar-powered vehicle to fifth consecutive time victory in eight-day bi-annual American Solar Challenge More

Nigerian Islamic School Tries to Combat Boko Haram

Kaduna school headmaster teaches his students that what militants are doing is are doing is 'a total misunderstanding of the Islamic religion' More

University Trains Students to Advocate for Deaf People Worldwide

Program prepares graduates to advocate internationally for access to education, jobs for people with disabilities More

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid