News / Middle East

Bomb Attacks in Iraq Kill 73

  • Municipality workers clean the site of a bomb attack in Baghdad, Jan. 15, 2014.
  • People gather at the site of a car bomb attack in Kirkuk, north of Baghdad, Jan. 15, 2014.
  • Municipality workers clean up after a car bomb attack near the Technology University on Sinaa Street in downtown Baghdad, Jan. 15, 2014.
  • People gather at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad's Ghazaliya district, Jan. 15, 2014.
  • People gather at the site of car bomb attack in Baghdad, January 15, 2014.
VOA News
A series of bomb attacks in Iraq has killed at least 73 people, while government forces have lost more ground in western Anbar Province to Sunni militants linked to al-Qaida.

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki appeared on state television Wednesday to say the war on terror and al-Qaida will continue, to keep the violence from spreading.  He urged the international community to keep aiding Iraq in its fight for security and oppose those powers who support terrorism.

Bomb Attacks in Iraq Kill 73i
X
January 16, 2014 6:06 AM
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is calling for international help in battling Sunni militants linked to al-Qaida.

The deadliest blast Wednesday killed at least 18 people at a funeral in Buhriz, north of Baghdad.  The funeral was for a member of a Sunni tribal militia that sided with U.S. forces in the region in 2006.  The militia has since been targeted by al-Qaida loyalists who see them as traitors.

In the capital, at least eight bombs exploded in mainly Shi'ite areas of the city.

Monthly Iraq civilian deaths, Nov., 2012 to Dec., 2013, UNAMIMonthly Iraq civilian deaths, Nov., 2012 to Dec., 2013, UNAMI
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Monthly Iraq civilian deaths, Nov., 2012 to Dec., 2013, UNAMI
Monthly Iraq civilian deaths, Nov., 2012 to Dec., 2013, UNAMI
Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Saleh Muhamed al-Mutlaq told VOA's Persian service in an interview late Tuesday that a more inclusive government would be helpful to establish more stability in Iraq. "What is needed from al-Maliki is to have an inclusive government that all the constituency will participate in, and there will be a real participation for those whom they think they are being isolated and marginalized for such a long time," he said.
 
Iraq is experiencing its worst unrest since 2008 when the country was emerging from a period of sectarian warfare between the country's Sunnis and Shi'ites.

U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said Monday during a visit to Iraq that he was especially worried about the deteriorating security situation, and called on Iraqi leaders to address the root causes of the surge in violence.

Some information for this report was provided by AFP and Reuters.

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
January 15, 2014 12:59 PM
Essentially it is the fault of USA to leave Iraq in the kind of trouble out there today devastating the country. It appears to be the legacy of USA to leave unfinished business of countries where it passes for one reason or another. Look at Iran which has been a crony of Russia (USSR) since the cold war era and it has maintained good relations to date. Iraq was with USA then, but had to fall out of favor soon after the cold war, and later to be eaten up in the desert wars. Then followed the immature and irresponsible pull of US army for US domestic politicking which has resulted in the present state of war in the country.

USA should have mobilized machinery to stop this happening in a newly emerging Iraq. But no. USA simply pulled out, an action most immature in diplomatic operation. No thanks to the irresponsibility at the White House that allowed same immaturity to replicate in Egypt, Libya and Syria making it seem that USA is just interested in itself and does not care what happens to its colonies, cronies and allies once it has satisfied itself. What a bad record. For now everything maybe going for it because it seems to have so much money to spread around in terms of aid, but time is coming, and it is coming soon, when those countries can prefer their ego to say to hell with it. USA should find a way of righting the wrong done in Iraq.

The story of devastation and killings in Iraq is the story of USA in relation with its friends and allies. It is not enough to report those daily killings and bombardments. It shows a story of USA and what it stands for. Today it is Iraq, with Israel endlessly battling insurgency around its borders – USA’s legacy – who knows whose turn it will be tomorrow and what form it will take. Will it be like Iraq, Egypt, Libya or Syria?


by: charlie from: california
January 15, 2014 12:41 PM
This was a peaceful, repressive country under Sadam, under the short-lived monarchy, under the couple of decades under the British and for half a millennium under the Turks. What could have happened in 2003 that turned Iraq into a human slaughterhouse? How was the US invasion so mis-managed that it upended the position of Sunnis and Shias that had existed for centuries. Similar to Wilson's 14 points to the Central Powers in 1918 that all but insured a second world war. Americans are naive about the rest of the world and too full of themselves. Hubris.

In Response

by: Moniq from: France
January 15, 2014 1:00 PM
yeah... Saddan knew how to deal with the Arabs... we thought they will love freedom and rights and self determination... sure... as soon as they had freedom they started killing each other... and now they are moving to Europe... I am telling you it will not end well...

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