News / Asia

Pakistan Bomb Blasts Kill More Than 110

An injured rescue worker receives treatment in a hospital after the second bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan, January 10, 2013.
An injured rescue worker receives treatment in a hospital after the second bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan, January 10, 2013.
VOA News
Four separate bombings killed more than 110 people and wounded nearly 250 across Pakistan Thursday, including 92 deaths in Quetta.

Police in the capital of Baluchistan province say a suicide bomber blew himself up inside a crowded billiard hall, followed by a second bomber there minutes later. The twin blasts killed 81 people, including police and rescue workers.  Police say most of the deaths came after the second blast caused the roof of the building to collapse

The billiard hall attacks came just hours after a bomb blast at the Quetta market killed 11 people. Authorities say paramilitary soldiers may have been the target.

The outlawed militant Sunni group Lashkar-e-Jhangive contacted local media to claim responsibility.

Baluchistan has grappled with a separatist insurgency, Islamic militancy, and sectarian violence for decades.

  • People mourn next to the coffins of their relatives who were killed in bombings, Quetta, Pakistan, January 11, 2013.
  • People attend funeral prayers for a victim who was killed by a bomb blast, in Mingora, Swat valley, Pakistan, January 11, 2013.
  • Shi'ite Muslims hold a silent protest a day after deadly blasts in Quetta, Pakistan, January 11, 2013. (H. Samsoor/VOA)
  • Journalists hold a black flag outside the Quetta Press Club to mourn the three journalists killed in the January 10th explosions in the city, Quetta, Pakistan, January 11, 2013.
  • A paramilitary soldier frisks a man at the entrance of a mosque in Mingora, Swat valley, Pakistan a day after deadly bombings, January 11, 2013.
  • A man takes a photograph with his mobile phone of a house that was damaged by a bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan, January 11, 2013.
  • People walk around the debris from a bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan, January 10, 2013. (Hameed Samsor/VOA)
  • Police and residents at the site of a bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan, January 10, 2013. (Hameed Samsor/VOA)
  • The site of bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan, January 10, 2013. (Hameed Samsor/VOA)

Elsewhere in Pakistan Thursday, at least 21 people were killed and more than 70 wounded in a bombing in the city of Mingora, where a crowd had gathered to hear a speech by a religious leader. Mingora is the largest city in northwestern Pakistan's Swat province.

No one has claimed responsibility for that attack.

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by: Anonymous
January 10, 2013 10:03 PM
This is interesting that Muslim bombers are the sunnis. I wonder what would happen if Sunnis in Syria overthrown Bashar Assad's regiem


by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
January 10, 2013 9:47 PM
This is another terrible and henious attack, on civilians; once again, as in the case of the Shia pilgrims in Iraq, it is a henious and barbaric attack; once again we hear no comments from the UN/US/EU/ and the rest of the world. These horrendous terrorist acts, against civilians, need to be condemed in the strongest possible terms. The Pakistani state, is clearly failing in providing security to its citizens, as usual, it also needs to be condemed.


by: john237 from: USA
January 10, 2013 6:43 PM
So far thousands of Shias in Pakistan and other countries have been killed by the Sunni-Wahabi (linked to Saudi Arabia-Kuwait)but surprisely no one from the Obama Administration, UN or other civilized nations are coming forward to condemned it and take action to stop it. Only because no one would like to displease oil kings. The Shia minority in almost all Muslim nations are being prejudiced and collectively killed for no reasons. It is time for the civilized world to stand up and take some decisive action to stop it.

In Response

by: Mohammed Wazza Pedophile from: Australia
January 11, 2013 3:22 AM
No, it is NOT up to the rest of the world to act!
Sunni, Shi'a, Sufi moslems et al consider each other to be apostate & it is their religious duty to kill apostates s pronounce by their pedophile prophet:
The evidence that the apostate is to be executed is the words of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him): “Whoever changes his religion, execute him.” (Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 2794). What is meant by religion here is Islam (i.e., whoever changes from Islam to another religion).
The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “It is not permissible to shed the blood of a Muslim who bears witness that there is no god except Allaah and that I am His Messenger, except in one of three cases: a soul for a soul (i.e., in the case of murder); a married man who commits adultery; and one who leaves his religion and splits form the jamaa’ah (main group of Muslims).” (Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 6878; Muslim, 1676)
Thus it will be clear to you that execution of the apostate is something that is commanded by Allaah, when he commanded us to obey the Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), as He says (interpretation of the meaning):
“O you who believe! Obey Allaah and obey the Messenger (Muhammad), and those of you (Muslims) who are in authority”
[al-Nisa’ 4:59]
So you got it? moslems are COMMANDED to kill apostates - such is the "Religion of Peace". And if they do that to one another, what makes you think that kuffr/infidels (non-moslems) will fare any better?

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