News / USA

Boston Bombing Suspect Exhibited Extremism at Local Mosque

Boston Bombing Suspect Showed Extremism at Local Mosquei
X
April 23, 2013 11:35 AM
Two ethnic Chechen brothers, suspected of the double bombings at the Boston marathon, attended a mosque in Cambridge Massachusetts. The bombs killed three and injured more than 170. The older brother, now deceased, is accused of being argumentative about his religion, critical of those who weren’t conservative Muslims. VOA Carolyn Presutti is back from Boston and has this report.
Two ethnic Chechen brothers, suspected of the double bombings at the Boston marathon, attended a mosque in Cambridge Massachusetts. The bombs killed three and injured more than 170.  The older brother, now deceased, is accused of being argumentative about his religion, critical of those who weren’t conservative Muslims.

The two bombing suspects are seen in the background of many pictures taken by spectators.  Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, who wore a white baseball cap on the day of the bombing, is recovering at a Boston hospital after gunbattles with police.  He faces the death penalty if convicted on a federal charge of using a weapon of mass destruction.  His older brother, Tamerlan, who wore a black hat, was killed by police four days after the bombings.

Tamerlan attended Friday prayers and occasionally daily prayers at a mosque in Cambridge, outside of Boston.  Mosque officials say that twice, he created a scene, arguing with the preachers - once about observing Thanksgiving and the U.S. Independence Day.  But the more recent episode involved Martin Luther King Jr. 

  • Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. Best viewed full screen. (Images courtesy Bob Leonard)
  • Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. (Courtesy Bob Leonard)
  • Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. (Courtesy Bob Leonard)
  • Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. (Courtesy Bob Leonard)
  • Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. (Courtesy Bob Leonard)


“The person who was delivering the sermon, he made a sort of a parallel between how Martin Luther King had inspired people just like our Prophet Muhammad had inspired people, and he [Tamerlan] seemed to have been offended by that. He stood up and objected to it,” recalled Anwar Kazmi, a mosque board member.

Mosque officials said Tamerlan called the preacher a "non believer" who was "contaminating people's minds."  The Congregation shouted back to him to leave and he did.

A YouTube page, purported to be Tamerlan’s, has videos that allegedly promote jihad, or holy war.

Both men lived in the Republic of Dagestan in Russia before coming to the United States. Their parents still have houses there.  U.S. officials say Tamerlan visited Dagestan last year.

The area is the focus of militants who want to establish an Islamist state, so residents are accustomed to daily violence.
 
"There're always blasts, always criminals here," explained Galia Sulemanan, who lives near the suspect’s father. "I only know them [the Tsarnaevs] as good neighbors, I don't know anything else."

Anvor, a Muslim activist, said he doesn’t understand why the brothers did not explode a bomb in their wartorn homeland, rather than at the Boston Marathon.

"There's no justification neither in Islam, nor in radical Islam, or Sufism, or even in Shia Islam to the thing that happened in Boston. There's no justification," Anvor said.

Others sid the United States needs to switch tactics to prevent future attacks.  

“We need to focus on the ideology and less on tactics," said Ryan Mauro, a member of a group that promotes tolerance and challenges radical Islam. "And until we combat the ideology itself, the current trend of Islamic terrorism around the world is going to increase.”

U.S. officials are still trying to determine if the Tsarnaev brothers acted alone or had support and training elsewhere.

Carolyn Presutti

Carolyn Presutti is an Emmy and Silver World Medal award winning television correspondent who works out of VOA’s Washington headquarters.   She has also won numerous Associated Press awards and a Clarion for her coverage of The Syrian Medical Crisis, Haiti, The Boston Marathon Bombing, Presidential Politics, The Southern Economy, and The 9/11 Bombing Anniversary.  In 2013, Carolyn aired exclusive stories on the Asiana plane crash and was named VOA’s chief reporter with Google Glass.

You can follow Carolyn on Twitter at CarolynVOA, on Google Plus and Facebook.

You May Like

Mali's Female Basketball Players Rebound After Islamist Occupation

Islamist extremists ruled northern Mali for most of 2012, imposing strict Sharia law, and now some 18 months later, the region is slowly getting back on its feet More

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

Many Chinese-made products go unsold, for now, with numerous Vietnamese consumers still angry over recent dispute More

Koreas Mark 61st Anniversary of War Armistice

Muted observances on both sides of heavily-armed Demilitarized Zone that separates two decades-long enemies More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Last crazy
April 23, 2013 1:01 PM
Muslims already be crazy for thousand years. But the basis for crazy is dissipating. The crazy will not last long. How long it could last depends on the spreading speed of knowledge and wisdom.


by: Father S. from: St. Marguerite d'Youville
April 23, 2013 9:07 AM
Satan always reveal himself in his hate for Israel. We just have to listen... antisemitism doesn't mean that something bad is going to happen to the local Jewish community... no... it means that something really bad is about to disfigure the society in which it happens... and if you invite Muslims into your community... watch out... your disintegration and regression to medieval barbarism is assured...

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Students in Business for Themselvesi
X
Mike O'Sullivan
July 26, 2014 11:04 AM
They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Not Even Monks Spared From Thailand’s Junta-Backed Morality Push

With Thailand’s military government firmly in control after May’s bloodless coup, authorities are carrying out plans they say are aimed at restoring discipline, morality and patriotism to all Thais. The measures include a crackdown on illegal gambling, education reforms to promote students’ moral development, and a new 24-hour phone hotline for citizens to report misbehaving monks. Steve Sandford reports from Bangkok.
Video

Video Virtual Program Teaches Farming Skills

In a fast-changing world beset by unpredictable climate conditions, farmers cannot afford to ignore new technology. Researchers in Australia are developing an online virtual world program to share information about climate change and more sustainable farming techniques for sugar cane growers. As VOA's Zlatica Hoke reports, the idea is to create a wider support network for farmers.
Video

Video Airline Expert: Missile will Show Signature on Debris

The debris field from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is spread over a 21-kilometer radius in eastern Ukraine. It is expected to take investigators months to sort through the airplane pieces to learn about the missile that brought down the jetliner and who fired it. VOAs Carolyn Presutti explains how this work will be done.
Video

Video Treatment for Childhood Epilepsy Heats up Medical Marijuana Debate

In the United States, marijuana is classed as an illegal drug by the federal government. But nearly half the states have legalized it, to some degree. Proponents say some strains of marijuana might have exceptional health benefits, for treating pain or inflammation in chronic conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Shelley Schlender reports on a strain of medical marijuana developed in Colorado that is reputed to reduce seizures in childhood epilepsy
Video

Video Airbus Adds Metal 3D Printed Parts to New Jets

By the end of this year, European aircraft manufacturing consortium Airbus plans to deliver the first of its new, extra-wide-body passenger jets, the A350-XWB. Among other technological innovations, the new plane will also incorporate metal parts made in a 3-D printer. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video AIDS Conference Welcomes Exciting Developments in HIV Treatment, Prevention

Significant strides have been made in recent years toward the treatment and prevention of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. This year, at the International AIDS Conference, the AIDS community welcomed progress on a new pill that may prevent transmission of the deadly virus. VOA’s Anita Powell reports from Melbourne, Australia.
Video

Video IAEA: Iran Turns its Enriched Uranium Into Less Harmful Form

Iran has converted its stockpiles of enriched uranium into a less dangerous form that is more difficult to use for nuclear weapons, according to the United Nations’ Atomic Energy Agency. The move complies with an interim deal reached with Western powers on Iran's nuclear program last year, in exchange for easing of sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

AppleAndroid