News / USA

Boston Bombing Suspect Formally Charged

In this April 19, 2013 photo, ATF and FBI agents check suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev after he was apprehended in Watertown, Mass.
In this April 19, 2013 photo, ATF and FBI agents check suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev after he was apprehended in Watertown, Mass.
VOA News
U.S. authorities have charged the Boston Marathon bombing suspect with using a weapon of mass destruction, meaning if he is convicted he could face the death penalty for last week's explosions that killed three people and injured more than 170 others.
 
The 19-year-old suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was charged in his hospital room Monday, while authorities continued to look for a motive behind the twin blasts near the finish line of the race. He also was charged with malicious destruction of property.
 
Attorney General Eric Holder said the investigation is continuing. He said, "We will hold those who are responsible for these heinous acts accountable to the fullest extent of the law."

Tsarnaev remained hospitalized under guard, lapsing in and out of consciousness and unable to speak to investigators.  He is suffering a gunshot wound to his throat, although it is unclear whether it came from a shootout with police or was self-inflicted.  However, Tsarnaev is reported to be answering some questions in writing.
 
After Boston's virtual lockdown on Friday during the manhunt for Tsarnaev, the city returned to some sense of normalcy Monday.  Commuters filled major highways leading into city, children walked to schools and businesses opened their doors on the first day of the work week.
 
Deadly bombings in the United States

  • April 15, 2013: Twin blasts at the Boston Marathon kill at least 3, injure more than 140
  • September 11, 2001: Hijacked jets crash into World Trade Center, Pentagon and a Pennsylvania field killing nearly 3,000
  • July 27, 1996: Atlanta Summer Olympics bombing kills 2, injures more than 100
  • April 19, 1995: Car bomb at Oklahoma City federal building kills 168, injures more than 500
  • February 26, 1993: Van explosion in World Trade Center garage kills 6, injures more than 1,000
  • December 29, 1975: Bomb at New York's LaGuardia Airport kills 11, injures 75
  • September 16, 1920: Bombing in New York's Wall Street area kills 40, injures hundreds
Boston, a large, major city in the northeastern U.S., was set to hold a moment of silence Monday at 2:50 p.m. local time to mark the passing of a week since the deadly explosions.  Bells are scheduled to ring throughout Boston and in other parts of Massachusetts to mark the solemn occasion.
 
A private funeral was set for one of the bomb victims, a restaurant catering manager, as well as a memorial service for a university graduate student killed in the blasts.
 
On Sunday, Boston's top police official said investigators believe the two brothers suspected in the bombings, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and his older brother Tamerlan, were planning other attacks.
 
An investigator walks across Boylston Street near the site of the bombings in Boston, April 21, 2013.An investigator walks across Boylston Street near the site of the bombings in Boston, April 21, 2013.
x
An investigator walks across Boylston Street near the site of the bombings in Boston, April 21, 2013.
An investigator walks across Boylston Street near the site of the bombings in Boston, April 21, 2013.
Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said on CBS' "Face the Nation" program that authorities found a cache of homemade explosives after the gun battle between police and the Tsarnaev brothers.  Davis said the scene was littered with unexploded bombs, and police found one improvised explosive device in the vehicle the brothers are accused of stealing.
 
The elder brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan, died in the shootout Thursday, while the younger Dzhokhar escaped, only to be captured alive hiding in a boat parked in the back yard of a suburban Boston resident.
 
The two suspects are ethnic Chechen immigrants who came to the United States as boys.  Authorities have given no indication as to what motivated the brothers.  So far, authorities say they do not believe the brothers were affiliated with a larger terrorist network and that they had acted alone.
 
Travel records show that last year Tamerlan Tsarnaev spent six months in Dagestan and Chechnya, predominantly Muslim republics in the north Caucasus region of Russia with active militant separatist movements.
 
U.S. investigators interviewed him in early 2011 at the request of "a foreign government," acknowledged by U.S. officials to be Russia.
 
A U.S. FBI statement late Friday indicated the request said Tamerlan had become a follower of radical Islam "and that he had changed drastically since 2010 as he prepared to leave the United States for travel to Russia's region to join unspecified underground groups."
  • A couple embraces at a memorial to the bombing victims on Boylston Street, April 21, 2013.
  • An investigator walks near the site of the bombings in Boston, April 21, 2013.
  • Patty Campbell watches as the casket containing the body of her daughter Krystle, one of the victims of the marathon bombing, is carried out of St. Joseph Church in Medford, Massachusetts, April 22, 2013.
  • Hundreds of people wait in a line that extends around the block to pay their respects to the family of Krystle Campbell, April 21, 2013.
  • Tsegaye Kebede of Ethiopia crosses the line to win the men's London Marathon, April 21, 2013. A defiant, festive mood prevailed in London, despite concerns raised by the recent attacks on the Boston Marathon.
  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, left, and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, are pictured. The ethnic Chechen brothers are the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing.
  • Tamerlan (C, bottom) Tsarnaev, accompanied by his father Anzor (L), mother Zubeidat and uncle Muhamad Suleimanov (R), are pictured in this photo courtesy of the Suleimanova family.
  • Patimat Suleimanova, the aunt of the Boston bomb suspects, speaks to The AP in her home in Makhachkala, Russia. Suleimanova says Tamerlan Tsarnaev struggled to find himself while trying to reconnect with his Chechen identity on a trip to Russia last year.

You May Like

Obama: Alaskans Feel Signs of Climate Change

They're seeing bigger storm surges as sea ice melts, more wildfires, erosion of glaciers, shorelines More

1855 Slave Brochure Starkly Details Sale of Black Americans

Document lists entire families that were up for sale in New Orleans, offering graphic insight into the slavery trade More

Katrina Brought Enduring Changes to New Orleans

The city’s recovery is the result of the people and culture the city is famous for, as well as newcomers and start-up industries More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: nannasin28 from: usa
April 23, 2013 4:50 AM
police found one improvised explosive device in the vehicle the brothers are accused of stealing.

by: Anonymous
April 22, 2013 7:22 PM
I hardly believe that a 19 year old boy would such a thing....considering myself too much occupied with the fun from video games and foot-ball.
I think there must be something behind it or behind that kid!

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Colombians Flee Venezuela as Border Crisis Escalatesi
X
August 27, 2015 2:08 AM
Hundreds of Colombians have fled Venezuela since last week, amid an escalating border crisis between the two countries. Last week, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro ordered the closure of a key border crossing after smugglers injured three Venezuelan soldiers and a civilian. The president also ordered the deportation of Colombians who are in Venezuela illegally. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video Colombians Flee Venezuela as Border Crisis Escalates

Hundreds of Colombians have fled Venezuela since last week, amid an escalating border crisis between the two countries. Last week, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro ordered the closure of a key border crossing after smugglers injured three Venezuelan soldiers and a civilian. The president also ordered the deportation of Colombians who are in Venezuela illegally. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video Is China's Economic Data Accurate?

Some investors say China's wild stock market gyrations have been made worse by worries about the reliability of that nation's economic data. And some critics say the reports can mislead investors by painting an unrealistically-strong picture of the economy. A key China scholar says Beijing is not fudging ((manipulating)) the numbers, but that the economy is evolving quickly from smoke-stack industries to services, and the ways of tracking new economic activity are falling behind the change. V
Video

Video Next to Iran, Climate at Forefront of Obama Agenda

President Barack Obama this week announced new initiatives aimed at making it easier for Americans to access renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Obama is not slowing down when it comes to pushing through climate change measures, an issue he says is the greatest threat to the country’s national security. VOA correspondent Aru Pande has more from the White House.
Video

Video Shipping Containers Provide Experimental Housing

Housing prices around the San Francisco Bay area are out of reach for many people, so some young entrepreneurs, artists and tech industry workers are creating their own houses using converted shipping containers. But as VOA's Mike O’Sullivan reports from Oakland, the effort requires ingenuity and dealing with restrictive local laws.
Video

Video Arctic Draws International Competition for Oil

A new geopolitical “Great Game” is underway in earth’s northernmost region, the Arctic, where Russia has claimed a large area for resource development and President Barack Obama recently approved Shell Oil Company’s test-drilling project in an area under U.S. control. Greg Flakus reports.
Video

Video Philippine Maritime Police: Chinese Fishermen a Threat to Country’s Security

China and the Philippines both claim maritime rights in the South China Sea.  That includes the right to fish in those waters. Jason Strother reports on how the Philippines is catching Chinese nationals it says are illegal poachers. He has the story from Palawan province.
Video

Video Technique May Eliminate Drill-and-Fill Dental Care

Many people dread visiting dentists because they're afraid of drills. Now, however, a technology developed by a British firm promises to eliminate the need for mechanical cleaning of dental cavities by speeding a natural process of tooth repair. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video China's Spratly Island Building Said to Light Up the Night 'Like A City'

Southeast Asian countries claim China has illegally seized territory in the Spratly islands. It is especially a concern for a Philippine mayor who says Beijing is occupying parts of his municipality. Jason Strother reports from the capital of Palawan province, Puerto Princesa.
Video

Video Ages-old Ice Reveals Secrets of Climate Change

Ice caps don't just exist at the world's poles. There are also tropical ice caps, and the largest sits atop the Peruvian Andes - but it is melting, quickly, and may be gone within the next 20 years. George Putic reports scientists are now rushing to take samples to get at the valuable information about climate change locked in the ice.
Video

Video French Experiment in Integrating Roma Under Threat

Plans to destroy France’s oldest slum have sparked an outcry on the part of its Roma residents. As Lisa Bryant reports from the Paris suburb of La Courneuve, rights groups argue the community is a fledgling experiment on integrating Roma who are often outcasts in many parts of Europe.
Video

Video Kenyans Turn to Agriculture for Business

Each year Kenyan universities continue to churn out graduates for the job market despite the already existing high rate of unemployment among youth in the country. Some of these young men and women have realized that agriculture can be as rewarding as any other business or job, and they are resorting to agribusiness in large numbers as a way of tackling unemployment. Rael Ombuor reports for VOA.
Video

Video First Women Graduate Elite Army Ranger School

Two women are making history for the U.S. Army by proving they are among the toughest of the tough. VOA's Carla Babb reports from Fort Benning, Georgia as 94 men and those two women rise as graduates of the difficult Ranger school.

VOA Blogs