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Brazil President Holds Cabinet Meeting on Protests

Rousseff Convenes Brazilian Ministers Over Protestsi
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June 21, 2013
President calls emergency cabinet meeting to discuss an intensifying protest movement after more than a million Brazilians poured into streets of at least 80 cities, demanding improved public services and an end to corruption. VOA's Jeff Custer has more.
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Jeff Custer
Brazil's president has held an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss an intensifying protest movement that has not slowed down despite government concessions.

President Dilma Rousseff did not give a statement after the meeting Friday, but her office says she will address the nation later in the evening.

The protests continued Friday with hundreds gathering in several cities, including Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

On Thursday, at least one million protesters rallied in dozens of cities across Brazil, including at least 300,000 in Rio de Janeiro, where police fired tear gas to contain the crowds.

Rousseff has already called off a trip to Japan planned for next week to respond to the protests, the country's biggest in two decades.

This week's protests were originally triggered by an increase in bus and subway fares, but protesters have since focused on what they say is the government's neglect of public services, high taxes, and rampant corruption.

Protesters have been undeterred by the news that Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro have scrapped plans to increase public transportation fees.

The protests also are targeting the billions of dollars being spent to host the 2016 Summer Games, next year's World Cup and this month's Confederations Cup.

  • A man stands between bonfires lit by demonstrators as they clashed with police during an anti-government protest in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 20, 2013.
  • Demonstrators take over one side of the Rodovia Dutra, one of the country's main highways, during a protest in Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil, June 20, 2013.
  • A riot police officer fires his weapon while confronting stone-throwing demonstrators during an anti-government protest in Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River, Brazil, June 20, 2013.
  • A woman walks past demonstrators detained for vandalism, as policemen stand guard, Recife City, Brazil, June 20, 2013.
  • Students, and members of the "Free Pass" movement, take part in a protest demanding improvements be made to the public transport system, at the bus station in the center of Brasilia, Brazil, June 19, 2013.
  • Brazilian police shoot tear gas at demonstrators during an anti-government protest in Rio de Janeiro's sister city, Niteroi, June 19, 2013.
  • Riot police aim their weapons at protesters near Castelao stadium in Fortaleza, Brazil, June 19, 2013.
  • Demonstrators run during clashes with riot police near the Estadio Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, June 19, 2013.
  • Demonstrators tear down a traffic light during clashes with riot police near the Estadio Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, June 19, 2013.
  • Demonstrators run after setting a vehicle on fire in Fortaleza, Brazil, June 19, 2013.
  • Demonstrators attack a vehicle belonging to the municipal government's traffic police during protests in Fortaleza, Brazil, June 19, 2013.

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by: jack from: prc
June 22, 2013 9:17 AM
final result ban? restore law&social order.who are organizers?


by: DAVID LULASA from: tambua,gimarakwa,hamisi,v
June 22, 2013 4:55 AM
the protesters cries should not be ignored..and the football fans at the confederation cup tournament should encaurage more persevence for the government and love of the sport.

lulasa...the president


by: JR from: Brasil
June 21, 2013 7:31 PM
It's a beautiful movement, but without a schedulized and clear demands, made by youngers, the most in their early twenties, almost all students, without leadership. Soon the party is over and they will back to Facebook and Twiter. But some will know what is to be a real citizen and will change this country forever.


by: Valkydes Dias from: Brazil
June 21, 2013 4:41 PM
Brazilians aren't only protesting for 20 cents less in their tickets but we are fighting for better conditions in our public transportations, fighting for a better health, fighting for better schools, fighting for security, fighting for everything that make a people be proud of the place where they live. We have to say: "No for the Corruption, No for Overspending at World Cup and Olimpic Games". WE MUST DO EVERYTHING IN PEACE. NO FOR VIOLENCE. THE GIANT HAS FINALLY WOKE UP.


by: Richard from: Brazil
June 21, 2013 10:13 AM
For many years the Brazilian Government has attempts to pass to foreign investors and international tourists a false image of prosperous country and full of opportunities. Despite our natural beauty, Brazil faces complex social problems caused by the collapse of its infrastructure and the title of most corrupt country in the world.

I advise to international tourists do not come to Brazil during the World Cup and the Olympics


by: ALISSON from: BRAZIL
June 21, 2013 9:57 AM
The population here is upset and we don't believe anymore in our politians. We are spending billions of dollars building stadiuns to World Cup and Olimpyc Games and we don't have hospital, schools and police services working well. We have a lot of corruption in ever sphere of public services. We can not stand along this situation.

In Response

by: DORAI RAJ L from: Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.
June 21, 2013 5:30 PM
First, you should know that Peoples' need is above all. 'Sports' is nothing important and it has never created what is really expected from it... that is 'international relationship through the participants of sports and games'. Still, 'sports' is a good habit to healthy citizens. To this, governments should try to develop games and sports only in schools and institutions so that future generation can be physically fit to live a healthy life. It is never required to spend money (what is meant for public welfare) too much to conduct international events of sports. So, please mind that you pay taxes to the governments and you are the real authority on the money spent. You can force/ urge your government to use money that you pay for public interest as you direct the government!


by: Sergio Brasil from: Brasil
June 21, 2013 9:21 AM
Doesn´t have federal government concessions until now.
Protesters rallied in centenas de cidades, for example in 90 representative cities only in southern Brazil.

In most cities the protests were peaceful, with isolated clashes with police, but the tabloid press have the center in clashed with police only.

Today the focused of protest is the government's neglect of public services, high taxes, and rampant corruption.

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