News / Middle East

Britain Pushing Harder for International Resolution in Syria

Britain Pushing Harder for International Resolution in Syriai
|| 0:00:00
X
November 10, 2012 4:12 AM
As opponents of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad meet in Doha, Britain is pushing for greater international involvement in the ongoing crisis in Syria. Some analysts say that pursuing a political solution, rather than a military one, is Britain's best play for Syria. Selah Hennessy reports for VOA from London.

Britain Pushing Harder for International Resolution in Syria

Selah Hennessy
— As opponents of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad meet in Doha, Britain is pushing for greater international involvement in the ongoing crisis in Syria. Some analysts say that pursuing a political solution, rather than a military one, is Britain's best play for Syria.

In Jordan, British Prime Minister David Cameron visited Syrians in Zaatari camp, which houses about 30,000 refugees, and he said the international community needs to put a new focus on solving Syria's conflict.

"We want Assad to go. We want to see a peaceful, political transition and a safe country for the future. But right now, the international community has to recognize, that what we have done is not enough," said Cameron.

While on a trip to Thailand, Britain's Foreign Secretary, William Hague, presented a written statement to the British parliament that Britain will begin talks with the armed opposition in Syria. But he said the rebels will not be supplied with arms.

Diplomacy has been largely fruitless, with Syria's allies at the U.N. Security Council, Russia and China, repeatedly blocking attempts to hit Syria with tougher sanctions.

In a televised interview that aired Friday, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad warned the international community against getting involved.

"It is not about reconciling with the people, and it is not about reconciliation between the Syrians and the Syrians; we do not have a civil war," said Assad. "It is about terrorism and the support coming from abroad to terrorists to destabilize Syria. This is our war."

Alia Brahimi, from the London School of Economics, said if Britain does want to help resolve the crisis in Syria, it should focus on the political rather than the military approach.

"To look at extending intense and perhaps military support to the armed opposition in Syria is very dangerous because that kind of effort so far, particularly on the part of some Gulf countries, has only led to the exacerbation of the conflict," said Brahimi.

A video, which cannot be independently verified, appears to show clashes in Aleppo in northwestern Syria, part of escalating violence.  

As battles continue inside Syria, the Syrian opposition has been holding talks in Qatar aimed at forming a political alternative to Assad's rule. Up until now, sharp divisions within the opposition have hampered attempts to oust Assad.

Forming a united political front may be the only chance to bring peace to Syria, though, according to Michael Kerr, of King's College London.

"At the minute China and Russia are resisting any efforts to push Assad out without something that will replace him that does not negate their interests in Syria," said Kerr.

Britain and its Western allies are banking that replacement can come out of the opposition meeting in Doha. Until then, thousands of Syrians continue to flee into neighboring countries.

You May Like

China Investigates Former Powerful Security Chief

Former security chief and member of Politburo Standing Committee, Zhou Yongkang, under investigation for suspected 'serious disciplinary violation' More

India, US Look to Reset Ties During Kerry Visit

This week's talks will be first high level interaction between two countries since Prime Minister Narendra Modi took charge More

Video Young African Leadership Program Renamed to Honor Mandela

YALI program, launched by President Obama in 2010, aims to build skills in business, entrepreneurship, public management and civic leadership More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Grin Olsson from: Alaska, USA
November 10, 2012 6:44 AM
The situation in Syria is tragic. As an American I'm concerned over requests for United Nations and Western intervention where two different ideologies of "Islam" is at hand, yet, when the clashes are between nations of Islam and secular or Christians, there is no request or help from Islamic nations to stop the violence.

Another issue is that the Sunni rebels are being supported by Qatar and Saudi Arabia the very same nations whose citizens bombed American soil at 9/11. Maybe the West is on the wrong side in this conflict as the Syrian govern is secular and protects all Islamic faiths including Christians and Kurds.

Maybe someone can enlighten me?


by: Anonymous
November 10, 2012 12:09 AM
The only way Assad would leave Syria is if he was either a) killed or b) pulled by the hair physically.

Assad doesn't care one bit about the country of Syria. Calling the civillians terrorists, blaming the west, and denying atrocities commited by his regime are the only thing he can do to try and stay in Syria a bit longer. It isnt working, everyday the hatred for Assad is growing more and more by not only Syrian Civillians but also people worldwide.

When Assad gets captured and if he gets a trial and sentenced in Syria lets just hope it is a Syrian Sword that serves his justice.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid