News / Asia

Burma Rejects UN Criticism of Riot Response

People shift through damaged buildings in Sittwe, capital of Rakhine state, western Burma, June 16, 2012.
People shift through damaged buildings in Sittwe, capital of Rakhine state, western Burma, June 16, 2012.
Burmese officials have told a visiting U.N. human rights expert that security forces exercised "maximum restraint" in responding to deadly riots between Buddhists and Muslim Rohingyas in the country's west last month.

In a statement Monday, the Burmese foreign ministry said it "strongly rejects" accusations that authorities engaged in abuses and excessive force to end the violence that killed more than 70 people in Rakhine state. Burmese officials discussed the situation in Rakhine with U.N. expert Tomas Ojea Quintana on Monday.

Last week, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said the Burmese government's response to the communal violence "may have turned into a crackdown targeting Muslims, in particular members of the Rohingya community."

Earlier this month, London-based rights group Amnesty International also said it has "credible reports" of Rakhine Buddhists and security forces targeting Rohingyas and other Rakhine Muslims with "physical abuse, rape, destruction of property and unlawful killings."

The Burmese foreign ministry said it "totally rejects" what it calls "attempts by some quarters to politicize and internationalize this situation as a religious issue." It said Burma is a multi-religious country where people of different faiths have lived together in peace for centuries.

Quintana said he plans to visit Rakhine on Tuesday.

The UNHCR has said last month's riots displaced about 80,000 people, with most living in camps or with host families in nearby villages. The Burmese government has said most of the refugees are Muslims.

The riots began after the rape and murder of a local Buddhist woman on May 28 and a subsequent revenge attack by Buddhists who killed 10 Muslims on June 3. Burma's government refuses to recognize the country's estimated 800,000 Rohingyas as an ethnic group and many Burmese consider them to be illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

Also Monday, Quintana visited Rangoon's Insein Prison to meet with political prisoners, including Wai Phyo Aung, who is suffering from cancer. The detainee's wife Ma Htay Htay attended the meeting and said the U.N. expert promised to help.

“He said he has been calling for the release [of political prisoners] along with [the] international community, and told us that he will push further for the release of my husband as he is terminally ill," she said. "He also pledges that he will try to let the international community know how my husband’s health -- liver cancer and paralysis --  has deteriorated from a lack of proper medical care.”

Burma has released hundreds of political prisoners since last year, when a civilian government with close ties to the military came to power, ending decades of harsh military rule. But some rights groups say hundreds of prisoners-of-conscience remain in government detention and should be freed.

- VOA Burmese Service's Aye Aye Mar contributed to this report.

Michael Lipin

Michael covers international news for VOA on the web, radio and TV, specializing in the Middle East and East Asia Pacific. Follow him on Twitter @Michael_Lipin

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by: charlie from: california
July 30, 2012 9:49 PM
While I often side with Muslims against Israel I have a problem with Bengals from Muslim and dangerously overcrowded Bangla Desh becoming the victims just because the Burmese want them to go back where they come from. They've been in Burma all the way back to the beginning of the twentieth century, a few of them, but that doesn't make them Burmese. Muslims are intolerant of other faiths and cultures. There is no wrong in my book in the natives of Assam, or a part of it not wanting to be over run by foriegners. The fact that Assam is part of India doesn't change that equation. Burma for the Burmese and Bengal in India and Bangla Desh for the Bengals. Or do we want hordes of people to over run every happily not over populated country on the planet? Of course the USA seems not to have a problem with that and we are to 300 million now. I'm agin' it!


by: Anonymous
July 30, 2012 3:18 PM
Holly war, religious war should be stopped at soonest and most effective means available or we are going to have world-wide problems.

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