News / Middle East

Egypt's Top General Defends Removal of Morsi

A pro-democracy protester burn an image of Lieutenant- General Abdel Fattah El Sisi, Egypt's Commanding General and Minister of Defense and Military Production, during a demonstration against what they said was a military coup that ousted Egyptian Preside
A pro-democracy protester burn an image of Lieutenant- General Abdel Fattah El Sisi, Egypt's Commanding General and Minister of Defense and Military Production, during a demonstration against what they said was a military coup that ousted Egyptian Preside
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VOA News
Facing fierce pressure from Islamists, Egypt's top general on Sunday said the decision to remove Islamist Mohamed Morsi from the presidency was made in response to what he called the will of the people.

General Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi spoke Sunday on national television, for the first time since Morsi's July 3 ouster.  He said Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president, had lost legitimacy because of mass protests by his opponents.  But he rejected accusations the removal was religiously motivated.

Morsi has been held at an undisclosed location since his removal, while scores of senior members of his Muslim Brotherhood Party have been taken into custody.  Authorities have not charged him with a crime, but say they are investigating a series of complaints against him including spying and wrecking the economy.

The Brotherhood urged its supporters to gather peacefully in Cairo on Monday for the latest in a series of mass protests against the Morsi ouster. Thousands have been rallying for days near a mosque in northeast Cairo to demand the former president's reinstatement.

A handout picture released by the Egyptian Presidency shows Egyptian leader Mohamed ElBaradei (L) being sworn in as Egypt's interim vice president for foreign relations, in front of Egypt's interim president Adly Mansour (R), in Cairo on Jul. 14, 2013.A handout picture released by the Egyptian Presidency shows Egyptian leader Mohamed ElBaradei (L) being sworn in as Egypt's interim vice president for foreign relations, in front of Egypt's interim president Adly Mansour (R), in Cairo on Jul. 14, 2013.
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A handout picture released by the Egyptian Presidency shows Egyptian leader Mohamed ElBaradei (L) being sworn in as Egypt's interim vice president for foreign relations, in front of Egypt's interim president Adly Mansour (R), in Cairo on Jul. 14, 2013.
A handout picture released by the Egyptian Presidency shows Egyptian leader Mohamed ElBaradei (L) being sworn in as Egypt's interim vice president for foreign relations, in front of Egypt's interim president Adly Mansour (R), in Cairo on Jul. 14, 2013.
In related developments, interim leaders on Sunday swore in prominent liberal Mohamed ElBaradei as vice president and offered the post of foreign minister to a former Egyptian ambassador to the United States.

More ministerial positions are expected to be confirmed in the coming days.

ElBaradei, a Nobel laureate and former head of the U.N. nuclear agency,  led a huge opposition coalition in the protests that prompted Morsi's removal.  Details of his new role were not immediately clear.

In another move Sunday, Egyptian judicial sources said the public prosecutor ordered the freezing of assets of 14 prominent Islamists, including Brotherhood supreme leader Mohamed Badie.

U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns is meeting with authorities in Cairo from Sunday to Tuesday in the first visit by a high-ranking U.S. official since Morsi's removal. The State Department said Burns will "underscore U.S. support for the Egyptian people, an end to all violence, and a transition leading to an inclusive, democratically elected civilian government."

Washington also has called on Egypt's interim leadership to avoid a politically motivated crackdown on the deposed president and his supporters.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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by: liaquat from: canada
July 15, 2013 3:48 AM
Egypt is completely in army dictatorship. Elected government has been dissolved w/o any legal or moral reason. Thousands of opponant of army are in jail, properties has been onfiscated, tv, radio and newspapers have been shut down. Hundreds of unarmed egyptions are being killed by brutal army on roads. God bless egypt


by: Dr. Malek Towghi from: USA
July 14, 2013 11:19 PM
If the present tug of war between General Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi and the Muslim Brotherhood is not resolved within a short period by a mutually agreed-upon compromise the consequences for Egypt will be devastating. The right person to broker a deal is Field Marshal Muhammad Hussein al-Tantawi. Egypt's friends and well-wishers may help. How about a deal on the following lines?:
1. General Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi retires with full honor.
2. Egypt's Armed Forces and the civilian authorities concerned request Field Marshal Muhammad Hussein el-Tamtawi to takeover as the Commander in Chief with all powers he had before his retirement.
3. As the Commander in Chief etc., Field Marshal Tantawi restores Dr. Muhammad Morsi as president -- along with his pre-coup Cabinet.
4. Parliamentary elections are held as scheduled before the coup.
5. All parties agree that this elected parliament will make the constitutional changes on a simple majority basis.
6. President Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood agree that if the Brotherhood-supported party gains less than 50% of the votes in the above-mentioned parliamentary elections, Morsi will resign, a care-taker president will be appointed with the mutual agreement of the Brotherhood and the Opposition, and new presidential elections will be held within two months after the parliamentary elections.

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