News / Middle East

Car Bombs Kill Dozens in Iraq

  • Onlookers gather outside Zain al-Abideen mosque, a Shi'ite place of worship, near where a suicide bomb attack occurred, Hilla, Iraq, May 21, 2013.
  • An Iraqi woman passes by the scene of a car bomb attack in Kamaliyah, a predominantly Shi'ite area of eastern Baghdad, May 20, 2013.
  • Mourners stand beside coffins of four members of a family killed in Basra bomb attacks, during a funeral in Najaf, Iraq, May 20, 2013.
  • Relatives carry the coffin of an Iraqi police officer killed by militants, Najaf, Iraq, May 20, 2013.
  • Residents gather at the site of a bomb attack in Basra, Iraq, May 20, 2013.
  • A wrecked truck is removed from the site of a car bomb attack in front of a crowded popular restaurant in Basra, Iraq, May 20, 2013.
  • People look at the scene of a car bomb attack in a predominantly Shi'ite area of eastern Baghdad, May 20, 2013.
TEXT SIZE - +
Edward Yeranian
— A wave of car bombings and suicide attacks against Shi'ite Muslims ripped through Iraqi cities Monday, killing at least 76 people and wounding scores more, extending the worst sectarian violence since U.S. troops withdrew from the country in December 2011.
 
Monday's violence was extensive in Baghdad, where at least nine car bombs exploded at busy market places, crowded bus stops, and other areas of Shi'ite neighborhoods. 
 
Burned-out vehicles and twisted metal littered the roadside near a car repair shop in a working-class district ravaged by one of the blasts. A young man who works at the repair shop says the force of the blast propelled people and debris in all directions.

The explosions followed another series of bloody car-bomb attacks Friday, aimed at mostly Sunni targets. Nearly 70 people were killed in those attacks.

x
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki said at a news conference Monday afternoon that the recent wave of violence was starting to resemble the worst period of sectarian strife to hit Iraq between 2005 and 2007. He said most Iraqis oppose such violence.
 
Maliki said that the violence does not reflect the will of the Iraqi people. He said political activists are stoking tensions to create a cover for acts of violence and carry out the agenda of foreign parties.
 
Bitter sectarian feuds
 
The rising violence in Iraq comes as a bitter and brutal sectarian conflict rages in neighboring Syria.
 
Analyst Maria Fantappie of the International Crisis group says the Syrian conflict is fueling some of the violence in Iraq, but that the domestic political stalemate and Maliki's unwillingness to compromise with his Sunni opponents is the main catalyst for the violence.
 
"On one side you have the government, which has given very piecemeal concessions without really undertaking negotiations," she said. "And on the other side you have the protesters, who are very divided and they did not, over the past five months, succeed in forming a united block that could be a counterpart for the government in the negotiations."
 
Fantappie said that attempts to hold negotiations appear to be stalled. She said the government's harsh security measures and weak response to protesters´demands gave the green light to members of the former resistance to respond with an armed fight. 
 
The United Nations said 712 people were killed in April, making it the deadliest month in Iraq since June 2008.

You May Like

Russia-Ukraine Crisis Could Trigger Cyber War

Why Europe and the US may be "whistling past the graveyard?" More

Egyptian Court Jails 23 Pro-Morsi Supporters

Meanwhile, Egyptian officials say gunmen have killed two members of the country's security forces More

Pakistani Journalists Protest Shooting of Colleague

Hamid Mir, a host for private television channel Geo, was wounded after being shot three times Saturday, but is expected to survive More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: MUSTAFA from: PAKISTAN
May 21, 2013 1:44 AM
The main problem in IRAQ they could not catch the main player behind these horrible scene. They must increase their quality of security personeel to handle problem of this magnitude.They cannot solve out going problem unless and until they catch real player and punish them in front of general public. They have to increase their justice system to solve all these important issues on an urgent basis.


by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
May 20, 2013 3:22 PM
Iraq was the creation of colonial empires that forced people into a quasi state against their will. Much of the type of forced states created by colonialists all over the world. Be it in the Balkans, or Africa or Asia; all such unions have created is massive bloodshed, continuous wars and never ending terrorism. al-Maliki, as his predesessors, has taken rights away from others, and governs for the interests of his own tribe. These type of states need to be allowed to fall appart, so that people can have self determination of their own; with time, they may join into larger states/unions, but it must be of their own free will. It is unfortunate, that so many valiant Western force members, became casualties in trying to keep such divided multi-national states united. Iraq, as Syria, should be allowed to fully segment, along national/tribal lines, maybe then some semblance of peace will come about. These tribal societies can't be forced to unite and share power. It took Western Europe almost 2000 yrs to abandon extreme tribalism.


by: Lisa from: USA
May 20, 2013 10:06 AM
thank God we are out of that Islamic cesspool...

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politicsi
X
Michael Eckels
April 19, 2014
There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politics

There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid