News / Science & Technology

Chimpanzee Minds Are Like Humans, Better in Some Ways

A chimpanzee named Ayumu performs the second stage of a memory test in which he must recall the location on a touch sensitive monitor of numerals that have changed to blank squares, at the Primate Research Institute in Kyoto, Japan, Dec. 13, 2006.A chimpanzee named Ayumu performs the second stage of a memory test in which he must recall the location on a touch sensitive monitor of numerals that have changed to blank squares, at the Primate Research Institute in Kyoto, Japan, Dec. 13, 2006.
x
A chimpanzee named Ayumu performs the second stage of a memory test in which he must recall the location on a touch sensitive monitor of numerals that have changed to blank squares, at the Primate Research Institute in Kyoto, Japan, Dec. 13, 2006.
A chimpanzee named Ayumu performs the second stage of a memory test in which he must recall the location on a touch sensitive monitor of numerals that have changed to blank squares, at the Primate Research Institute in Kyoto, Japan, Dec. 13, 2006.
At Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, a chimpanzee named Ayumu is performing a task that is impossible for a person to do, revealing how chimp cognition can mirror - and in some cases surpass - the capabilities of the human brain.

Sitting in front of a computer monitor that briefly displays the numbers one through nine in a random pattern, the chimp touches the number one. The remaining digits are immediately hidden behind white squares. But Ayumu can touch where each number was, in ascending order - 2, 3, 4, and so on. People cannot remember the location of more than a few numbers.

At the annual meeting in Boston of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, researcher Tetsuro Matsuzawa showed a video [seen above] demonstrating Ayumu's extraordinary working memory. He suggests that although humans cannot match that skill, we don't need to, because we have language.

"Chimpanzees are so good at memorizing things at a glance. We are not so good at memorizing things at a glance, but we can see the things and perceive the meaning of what we see," said Matsuzawa.

Watch this incredible video of Ayumu in action, courtesy of the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University:



Other research presented at the AAAS meeting, which highlighted the similarities between primate and human minds, found occurrences of human-like depression, post-tramatic stress disorder and anxiety disorders among captive great apes. These studies have helped fuel a growing movement to stop using primates as research subjects, or at least to put new ethical guidelines in place to protect lab primates from cruel or inhumane treatment.

You May Like

Video China Investigates Powerful Former Security Chief

Analysts say move by President Xi is an effort to win more party support, take step toward economic reforms, removing those who would stand in way of change More

South Africa Land Reforms Still Contentious 20 Years Later

Activists argue that the pace of land reform is slow and biased; legal experts question how some proposed reforms would be implemented More

In Vietnam, Religious Freedoms Violated, UN Finds

Beliefs reportedly prompt heavy surveillance, intimidation and travel restrictions More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: andrewborovskikh@gmail.co
February 20, 2013 9:03 AM
Look, this is not just “the chimpanzee in the street”, it’s a JAPANESE chimpanzee. Everything a Japanese takes up, becomes better, more refined and completed. If a Japanese takes up, say, growing apples, they are gonna be the roundest apples in the world. You know, packed in boxes, they look like billiard or Christmas balls. So, you see, it’s not a “chimpanzee in the car” anymore, it’s the aptest ape in the world now.
On the other hand, just imagine you are a captive, and the only entertainment you have is the long-coveted banana. Would you not exert yourself to memorize the location of the nine numbers to get the prize and maybe to avoid a rap from your captor?


by: Timur Tyncherov
February 20, 2013 8:57 AM
Look at the touch screen with the transparent guard this chimp uses. He can touch the squares, but he cannot wallop the screen angry when it does not come off. I can also punch the miscreant vendor when it holds out on a beer can. Our minds are very much alike indeed. Good study! Mr. Matsuzawa, a free banana from me for Ayumu-kun!


by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
February 18, 2013 11:18 AM
Others have reported many basic human like social interactions, and a basic ability to solve some simple problems. Given these very amazing new findings, humanity should absolutely and immediately outlaw the use of primates for any type of experimentation, and provide some very basic universal guranteed protections and rights, beyond the existing animal protection laws.

In Response

by: Cranksy from: USA
February 18, 2013 1:34 PM
Hi JKF, it is not just primates that have those traits. For me, if an animal is capable of feeling distress is a very important consideration. What you propose would be a beginning.


by: Cranksy from: USA
February 16, 2013 12:47 PM
Please think twice when acting as if human beings are that different from other conscience beings.

In Response

by: JKF from: Ottawa, canada
February 18, 2013 4:49 PM
You are correct, but because primates share so many human genes, with humans, they are one of the principal species, used, for testing many geno/ chemicals, medical related procedures, etc. In my view all testing on creatures should be stopped, given that you ca use computerized models; and actually grow organs from stem cells and even skin cells...

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Gazans in Shelled School Sought Shelteri
X
Scott Bobb
July 30, 2014 8:16 PM
Israel's air and ground assault against Hamas-led fighters in Gaza has forced many Palestinians to flee their homes, seeking safety. But safe places are hard to find, as VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jabaliya.
Video

Video Gazans in Shelled School Sought Shelter

Israel's air and ground assault against Hamas-led fighters in Gaza has forced many Palestinians to flee their homes, seeking safety. But safe places are hard to find, as VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jabaliya.
Video

Video Rapid Spread of Ebola in West Africa Prompts Global Alert

Across West Africa, health officials are struggling to keep up with what the World Health Organization describes as the worst ebola outbreak on record. The virus has killed hundreds of people this year. U.S. President Barack Obama and other world leaders are watching the developments closely as they weigh what actions, if any, are needed to help contain the disease.
Video

Video Michelle Obama: Young Africans Need to Embrace Women's Rights

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama urged some of Africa's best and brightest to advocate for women's rights in their home countries. As VOA's Pam Dockins explains, Obama spoke to some 500 participants of the Young African Leaders Initiative, a six-week U.S.-based training and development program.
Video

Video Immigrant Influx on Texas Border Heats Up Political Debate

Immigrants from Central America continue to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in south Texas, seeking asylum in the United States, as officials grapple with ways to deal with the problem and provide shelter for thousands of minors among the illegal border crossers. As VOA's Greg Flakus reports from Houston, the issue is complicated by internal U.S. politics and U.S. relations with the troubled nations that immigrants are fleeing.
Video

Video Study: Latino Students Most Segregated in California

Even though legal school segregation ended in the United States 60 years ago, one study finds segregation still occurs in the U.S. based on income and race. The University of California Los Angeles Civil Rights Project finds that students in California are more segregated by race than ever before, especially Latinos. Elizabeth Lee reports for VOA from Los Angeles.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video A Summer Camp for All the World

VIDEO: During workshops and social gatherings, the Global Youth Village summer camp encourages young people to cooperate and embrace their differences, while learning to communicate with people from other countries. VOA's Deborah Block has more.
Video

Video From Cantankerous Warlock to Incorruptible Priest, 'Harry Potter' Actor Embraces Diverse Roles

He’s perhaps best known as Mad Eye Moody, the whimsical wizard in the Harry Potter franchise. But character actor Brendan Gleeson's resume includes dozens of films, and he embraces all the characters he inhabits with equal passion. In an interview with VOA’s Penelope Poulou, Gleeson discussed his new drama "Calvary" and his secret to success.

AppleAndroid