News / Asia

    China Arms Exports Double as Regional Tensions Mount

    FILE - Paramilitary policemen and members of a gun salute team fire cannons during a training session for a military parade to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of the World War II, at a military base in Beijing, China. China is now the world’s third largest arms exporter behind the U.S. and Russia, and the country accounted for nearly six percent of arms exports between 2011 and 2015.
    FILE - Paramilitary policemen and members of a gun salute team fire cannons during a training session for a military parade to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of the World War II, at a military base in Beijing, China. China is now the world’s third largest arms exporter behind the U.S. and Russia, and the country accounted for nearly six percent of arms exports between 2011 and 2015.

    A research group says China’s arms exports have almost doubled in five years as the country has moved to become a major player in the global industry.

    Chinese exports of major arms grew by 88 percent between 2011 and 2015, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

    “China is actively pushing for exports. A lot of the exports are going to countries where China has had good relations for a long time, so there’s also a strategic incentive for China to supply weapons. Pakistan for example, Bangladesh, Myanmar,” said Siemon Wezeman, a senior researcher with the institute.

    China is now the world’s third largest arms exporter behind the U.S. and Russia, and the country accounted for nearly six percent of arms exports between 2011 and 2015.

    FILE - A Russian "TOS-1 Buratino" multiple rocket launcher fires during the "Russia Arms Expo 2013" 9th international exhibition of arms, military equipment and ammunition, in the Urals city of Nizhny Tagil. The U.S. and Russia’s weapons exports grew by 27 and 28 percent respectively during the period.
    FILE - A Russian "TOS-1 Buratino" multiple rocket launcher fires during the "Russia Arms Expo 2013" 9th international exhibition of arms, military equipment and ammunition, in the Urals city of Nizhny Tagil. The U.S. and Russia’s weapons exports grew by 27 and 28 percent respectively during the period.

    The U.S. and Russia’s weapons exports grew by 27 and 28 percent respectively during the same period, although both countries are still far ahead of China and the rest of the world in total sales.

    Imports of arms to China fell 25 percent compared with the previous five-year period, indicating that China now has the technological capability and know how to produce many of its own weapons.

    Wezeman said territorial disputes and the growing modernization of China’s military may be spurring an arms race in Asia. China’s military budget was up 10 percent from the year before, to more than $141 billion.

    “You can see a general arms build-up in Asia. You can see countries reacting to what neighbors are doing, and a strong driver for this is Chinese military modernization, expanding Chinese capabilities, linked to a quite assertive Chinese policy,” he said.

    Vietnam jumped from 43rd place to become the eighth-largest arms importer from 2011 to 2015. The country now accounts for roughly 3 percent of world-wide arms purchases during that period. India imported 14 percent of globally traded arms during that time period.

    Tensions rising across Asia

    Gregory Poling is the director of the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative and a fellow with the Sumitro Chair for Southeast Asia Studies at CSIS. Poling said China's recent actions in the South China Sea are raising tensions throughout Southeast Asia.

    “More immediately this is clearly destabilizing the wider region, for states like Vietnam, the Philippines and Indonesia, would much rather be focused on economic development and boosting regional architecture," Poling said. "Instead they’re caught in what they see as an almost existential need to boost their militaries, to purchase arms, to divert budgets towards modernization in ways that they would rather not but they’re facing a Beijing that they see as an increasing security threat.”

    Five trillion dollars in global trade passes through the waterway every year, and the sea is thought to be rich in oil and gas reserves.

    FILE - This aerial photo taken through a glass window of a military plane shows China's alleged on-going reclamation of Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea, May 11, 2015.
    FILE - This aerial photo taken through a glass window of a military plane shows China's alleged on-going reclamation of Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea, May 11, 2015.

    Bonnie Glaser, a senior adviser for Asia and the director of the China Power Project at CSIS, said while territorial disputes may boost arms sales in Asia, China's neighbors' won't be able to keep up with the pace of China's military modernization.

    “They want to have other choices rather than feeling that they simply have to accommodate to China, and they don’t have enough capability, even with their increased weapons spending and procurements, no country on China’s border is going to be able to keep up with China," Glaser said. "Look at its defense spending. So countries are going to have to find more creative ways. They can certainly enhance their own capabilities.”

    Collaboration among China’s neighbors has already increased to protect their territorial claims. Earlier this month Vietnam announced it will allow India to set up a satellite tracking center in southern Vietnam that will provide it with access to overhead images of the South China Sea. 

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Deni
    March 13, 2016 8:10 AM
    If Indonesia sees Beijing as an increasing security threat, why would Indonesia arms itself with Chinese weaponry? The weapons include carrier-killer antiship missiles and air to air missiles capable of shooting down F/A-18. So far, America has hard time selling weapons to Indonesia. So far, only 4 of 8 Apache attack helicopters contract was received years ago. What happens to the remaining 4? Has the contract been canceled? A shame that Sumitro Foundation is not based in Indonesia anymore, otherwise it will know Indonesian political condition better.

    by: American Eskimo from: San Jose, USA
    February 29, 2016 4:38 PM
    When China was weak and the West came to her shores with gunboats and the humiliation is still fresh. Today, with BOMBers flyover and GUNboats sail by, China build-up her military to prevent another humiliation.......never again!
    For thousands of years, China and her neighbors had conflicts and always worked them out among themselves; there are conflicts now and will work them out as in past history.
    There is this country from the far end of the Pacific wishing to maintain her hegemony in Asia by agitating the tension to stir up wars, to create refugees and destructions much like she does worldwide.
    There will be NO tension, if the agitator stops the provocation. China and her neighbors will work out the current conflicts peacefully among themselves.
    .

    by: william li from: canada
    February 29, 2016 12:34 PM
    the best way to avoid a war is to make yourself stronger. China clearly understand it.
    "Defeat your enemy without fighting one bullet" the old Chinese saying.

    by: meanbill from: USA
    February 29, 2016 8:21 AM
    No matter what the military experts say, (it would be militarily impossible), for any super power (the US, Russia, or China) to ever fight a conventional war against any one of them, [because it'd be impossible] to assemble an army large enough and transport it with the heavy weapons, air and sea power that would be required to launch an attack on any of the others? .. It's impossible? .. Check the facts, and ignore the propaganda?

    That's why the US, Russia ad China have stockpiled nuclear weapons, knowing all their wars will be (proxy wars) fought in other countries where they themselves won't fight head to head in the future? .. think about it? .. That's why the sell weapons to friends and allies? .. The next supper power war, will be a (proxy war) fought in some other country, like Syria, Libya, Ukraine and Yemen?
    In Response

    by: Norman from: Austraila
    March 08, 2016 8:09 PM
    You know the Old Saying .
    It is always the Little Fish 'that Suffer..
    Greed is the Killer of everything.

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