News / Science & Technology

China Boasts World's Fastest Computer

China's Tianhe-2 is now the world's fastest supercomputer. Credit: TOP500.org
China's Tianhe-2 is now the world's fastest supercomputer. Credit: TOP500.org

Related Articles

New Supercomputer Could be World's Fastest

'Titan' is capable of making more than 20,000 trillion- or 20 petaflops- calculations each second
VOA News
China can now boast the world’s fastest supercomputer, according to the semiannual TOP500 official listing of the world's fastest supercomputers released Monday.

Tianhe-2, or Milky Way-2, clocked in at number one with a performance of 33.86 petaflops per second, according to a press release issued byTOP500. The computer was developed by China’s National University of Defense Technology and will be deployed at the National Supercomputer Center in Guangzho, China, by the end of the year.

China last wore the crown of fastest supercomputer in November of 2010 with Tianhe-1.

The Chinese computer was a surprising winner, according to the release, because it was developed two years ahead of schedule.

Tianhe-2 has 16,000 nodes, each with two Intel Xeon IvyBridge processors and three Xeon Phi processors for a combined total of 3,120,000 computing cores.

"Most of the features of the system were developed in China, and they are only using Intel for the main compute part," said TOP500 editor Jack Dongarra in a news release accompanying the announcement. "That is, the interconnect, operating system, front-end processors and software are mainly Chinese," said Dongarra, who toured the Tianhe-2 development facility in May.

The previous number one, the Cray-made Titan computer installed at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, is now ranked second. The third ranking computer, IBM’s Sequoia, installed at DOE’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is also in the U.S.

You May Like

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said To Be Improving

Experimental drugs have been tried on six people: three Westerners and now, three African pyhysicians More

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities residents rebuild their lives, but many say everyone is being treated with suspicion More

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

Girls learn to object; FGM practitioners face penalties from jail sentences to stiff fines More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Steven G. from: Bronx, New York
June 20, 2013 11:19 AM
I don't know how the Chinese can says they have the fastest computer when its chocked full of American made computer chips. Intel seems to be all over the place. They just happen to have a bigger budget and purchased more american chips. This side show really doesn't impress me with Chinese ingenuity.

In Response

by: K. Southall
June 25, 2013 5:19 PM
Steven, you do realize that a)many of the engineers in Intel are not American, they are of numerous ethnicities and b)most of Intel's chips are made in the Philippines. And have been for quite some time.

I seriously doubt you could call whatever chips they used "American made"

Corporate entities are multi-national, they know no allegiance to nation states, and the ingenuity of engineers can be found all over.

Our Hubris as Americans will spell our downfall, and already is. We are an aging empire and if "American ingenuity" and well being is going to last into the 21st century we really, really, need to look around us, see how the world is changing, and protect our interests with less arrogance and hubris. Once the UK was an industrial powerhouse. Today it is largely an industrial backwater (though a Financial sector of great value).

It is hard for we Americans to come to terms with the current global layout but the reality is that "we" however you decide to contextualize we are being outstripped pace by pace around the world. You can try to blame anyone you like, but it is always wiser for us to first put blame at our doorsteps, and examine where our attitudes actions or inactions contribute, and stop deluding ourselves first.


by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
June 19, 2013 9:53 PM
China must steal American's tech. Oh wait a minute, American computer is only half the speed as the China's. How could theirs be better is they steal.

In Response

by: Jonathan Chu from: America
July 03, 2013 10:58 AM
Correct me if I'm wrong but... First of all, you say, "China must USE America's tech." Steal isn't the right word. Then you say, "America's computer ARE only half the speed as China's." And finally,"How could theirs be better IF they steal." I maybe better in english but maybe not chinese. So you can correct me when I say something wrong.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
June 19, 2013 4:08 AM
Congrats China. I hope Chinese scientists would win Nobel Prize more and more and contribute to the prosperity of people around the world through the developement of science.


by: Liu yang from: China
June 18, 2013 8:12 PM
China can now boast the world’s fastest supercomputer, according to the semiannual TOP500 official listing of the world's fastest supercomputers released Monday.
BOAST: now I fully understand VOA is the mouthpiece of the US gov.

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
June 19, 2013 3:36 AM
I have been undestanding VOA is actually a mouthpiece of the U.S. government. Could you tell me how have you been thinking about VOA?

I suppose if Japanese computer is ranked as the fastest computer, VOA would also report Japan can now boast.....


by: Eric from: Oceanside
June 17, 2013 5:27 PM
The article is misleading. The U.S. didn't run their "fastest" in this competition. What we share with the world is what our fastest was five years ago as far as public information is concerned. It's always been that way.

In Response

by: joezhifu from: Singapore
June 18, 2013 6:48 AM
Good to know. Thought you lost the game for the moment/.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improvingi
X
Carol Pearson
August 19, 2014 11:43 PM
The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improving

The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As the Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities from pro-Russian separatists, residents are getting a chance to rebuild their lives. VOA's Gabe Joselow reports from the town of Kramatorsk in Donetsk province, where a sense of fear is still in the air, and distrust of the government in Kyiv still runs deep.
Video

Video China Targets Overseas Assets of Corrupt Officials

As China presses forward with its anti-graft effort, authorities are targeting corrupt officials who have sent family members and assets overseas. The efforts have stirred up a debate at home on exactly how many officials take that route and how likely it is they will be caught. Rebecca Valli has this report.
Video

Video Leading The Fight Against Islamic State, Kurds Question Iraqi Future

Western countries including the United States have begun arming the Kurdish Peshmerga forces in northern Iraq to aid their battle against extremist Sunni militants from the Islamic State. But there are concerns that a heavily-armed Kurdistan Regional Government, or KRG, might seek to declare independence and cause the break-up of the Iraqi state. As Henry Ridgwell reports from London, the KRG says it will only seek greater autonomy from Baghdad.
Video

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

In some Kenyan communities, female genital mutilation remains a rite of passage. But activists are pushing back, with education for girls and with threats of punishment those who perform the circumcision. Mohammed Yusuf looks at the practice in the rural eastern community of Tharaka-Nithi.
Video

Video For Obama, Racial Violence is Personal Issue

The racial violence in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson is presenting U.S. President Barack Obama with an issue to which he has a deep personal connection. To many Americans, Obama's election as America's first black president marked a turning point in race relations in the United States, and Obama has made ending the violence a policy priority. On Monday he issued a new call for calm and understanding. Luis Ramirez reports from the White House.
Video

Video Clinton-Obama Relationship Could Impact 2016 Election

President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have a long and complicated relationship. That relationship took another turn recently when Clinton criticized the president’s foreign policy. VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone reports there is renewed attention on the Clinton-Obama relationship as Hillary Clinton considers running for
Video

Video Iran Looks to Maintain Influence in Baghdad With New Shia PM

Washington and Tehran share the goal of stopping Syrian-based militants in Iraq. But experts say it's Iran, not the United States, that will most influence how the new government in Baghdad approaches internal reforms and the war in Syria. VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns has the story.

AppleAndroid