News / Asia

New Chinese Law Allows for Search, Expulsion of Foreign Ships

Chinese fishing boats sail in the lagoon of Meiji reef off the island province of Hainan in the South China Sea, July 20, 2012.
Chinese fishing boats sail in the lagoon of Meiji reef off the island province of Hainan in the South China Sea, July 20, 2012.
VOA News
China will soon allow border police to board and search foreign ships that enter what Beijing considers its territorial waters in the disputed South China Sea.

In a move likely to raise regional tensions, state media say police in the southern island province of Hainan will soon be authorized to "land on, check, seize, and expel foreign ships" that enter the area illegally.

The official China Daily says "illegal" activities include entering the province's waters without permission and "engaging in publicity that endangers China's national security." It says the new rules will take effect January 1.

Hainan, China's southernmost province, administers nearly two million square kilometers of the sea. In July, the Chinese military angered its neighbors by setting up a garrison in Hainan's newly established Sansha City, in an effort to enforce its claims in the region.

Many of China's rival claimants, which include the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia and Taiwan, are concerned about what they see as Beijing's increasing assertiveness in defending its claims in the energy-rich South China Sea.

Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hong Lei said in a regular briefing Thursday that China has the right to implement the new regulations.

"Carrying out maritime management according to law is the justified right of a sovereign country," said Hong.

The China Daily also said new maritime surveillance ships will soon join Beijing's South China Sea patrol fleet, which has been expanded following recent high-profile standoffs with the Philippines and Vietnam.

Meanwhile, the Philippine Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario on Thursday called on China to withdraw three ships from the site of an April standoff.

Del Rosario told ABS-CBN television that Beijing has not fulfilled its promise to remove its ships from the disputed Scarborough Shoal, as agreed by both countries six months ago.

You May Like

Mali's Female Basketball Players Rebound After Islamist Occupation

Islamist extremists ruled northern Mali for most of 2012, imposing strict Sharia law, and now some 18 months later, the region is slowly getting back on its feet More

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

Many Chinese-made products go unsold, for now, with numerous Vietnamese consumers still angry over recent dispute More

Koreas Mark 61st Anniversary of War Armistice

Muted observances on both sides of heavily-armed Demilitarized Zone that separates two decades-long enemies More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 3
 Previous   Next 
by: bean cube from: Seattle WA
December 01, 2012 1:03 AM
We, all Americans, can smell war selling. CIA, hiding behind US navy, can access all those oceans without being asked any tough questions. CIA can use a lot of QE money to foreclose a lot of Philippines small businesses and become Vietnam communist's new bosses, they shouldn't have concern about economic development because it won't happen when resources and capitals are all hijacked by selling wars.


by: Ed604 from: Canada
November 30, 2012 10:25 PM
China is doing exactly what other countries that considered themselves "superpowers" did in the past. This forum sounds like a bunch of bitter girls complaining about useless claims about law, history, or even bringing up Tibet in the topic. Italy doesn't reclaim lands of the foreign roman empire because they barely have any power (military, economy, etc) and the last time i heard they were about to go bankrupt. Natives can't take back North Ameria because they also dont have any power to do it. But you know what? China has more than enough power to control Tibet and the southern seas. If you haven't noticed most of the countries that are involved are equally as corrupt or even worse. I heard the Philipines has actors as presidents and I bet if Manny Pacquiao ran for president he would probably win too. India should worry about the liveilhood of their own people first considering that 60 percent literacy rate (40 percent can't read out of 1.1 billion).

Also for Japan to tell China to follow the rule of law is pretty funny. I wonder who sets the "rules" ? USA ? UK? France? Judging from all the chaos that is happening in Israel and Palestine I think it is pretty clear that whoever has the power makes the "rules" and unfortunately for Japan, they have no power, except maybe radiation.

Fact is the strong will be in control. The USA has done similar acts for years in South America, Africa, and other third world countries. China is just following the foot step of USA, England, and all the other super powers. So cry more about this everybody!


by: fds from: japan
November 30, 2012 7:58 PM
china's claims are based on history. japan's claims are based on law. that's why china doesn't won't go to the international court of justice. that's why china has so much corruption. that's why china's economy is stalling. china will never be a truly great country until it can follow the rule of law.


by: nick from: ny
November 30, 2012 6:39 PM
china likes to argue that "since historical times" tibet is theirs, the entire south asian seas are theirs, that this territory or that territory is theirs. i think italy should re-claim lands of the former roman empire and turkey should re-claim lands of the former ottoman empire. while we're at it, native americans should claim all of north and south america. china is a joke.


by: fuall17 from: China
November 30, 2012 6:27 PM
China = Hitler Germany


by: remie from: canada
November 30, 2012 6:24 PM
@nomnom, more proof chinese people are bias or brainwash. If so much ancient evidence please provide evidence to world. Chinese history is fable(lies) mix with arrogance NOT facts. I mean can u believe they claim ALL asians are chinese therefore it is their right to rule asia,and that is FACT.


by: NomNom
November 30, 2012 2:41 PM
I bet most people who write comments here don't even know what Eastern Asia exactly looks like. If you are interested in this topic and want to insist that China is the evil side in this game, please read some history. China's sovereignty over these oceans is based on historical evidence, and Japan, Vietnam, Philippine can not even deny it or prove it's wrong, so they just ignore the fact, and tell China to follow "international law". Chinese people discovered, lived, and ruled these seas and islands since thousands years ago, when Roman Empire still existed and most eastern asian countries were not born, and they want to use the "international law" which was created by modern western world to take Chinese territory which their ancestors left to them?


by: Wangchuk from: NYC
November 30, 2012 10:42 AM
The PRC has no legal authority in int'l waters, including South China Sea, to stop & board foreign vessels for any reason. This is yet another example of the hegemonistic attitude of the CCP/PRC that views China has the Middle Kingdom & all other Asian states as vassals. If the PRC illegally boards foreign vessels in int'l waters, then the navies of those vessels should escort them to protect them & prevent illegal actions by the PRC.


by: mhee from: Philippines
November 30, 2012 7:41 AM
Why this greedy new Chinese leader who doesn't even know English at all (needs interpreter) wants to own all the seas around the world.Stop calling the sea South China sea because its already West Philippine sea,period!


by: Samurai from: Japan
November 30, 2012 4:50 AM
Japanese Marine Safe officers in the Senkaku islands waters will soon be authorized to "land on, check, seize, and expel Chinese ships" that enter the area illegally every day. Coming Japanese administration will become more strict to Chinese outlaw ships.

Comments page of 3
 Previous   Next 

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Students in Business for Themselvesi
X
Mike O'Sullivan
July 26, 2014 11:04 AM
They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Not Even Monks Spared From Thailand’s Junta-Backed Morality Push

With Thailand’s military government firmly in control after May’s bloodless coup, authorities are carrying out plans they say are aimed at restoring discipline, morality and patriotism to all Thais. The measures include a crackdown on illegal gambling, education reforms to promote students’ moral development, and a new 24-hour phone hotline for citizens to report misbehaving monks. Steve Sandford reports from Bangkok.
Video

Video Virtual Program Teaches Farming Skills

In a fast-changing world beset by unpredictable climate conditions, farmers cannot afford to ignore new technology. Researchers in Australia are developing an online virtual world program to share information about climate change and more sustainable farming techniques for sugar cane growers. As VOA's Zlatica Hoke reports, the idea is to create a wider support network for farmers.
Video

Video Airline Expert: Missile will Show Signature on Debris

The debris field from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is spread over a 21-kilometer radius in eastern Ukraine. It is expected to take investigators months to sort through the airplane pieces to learn about the missile that brought down the jetliner and who fired it. VOAs Carolyn Presutti explains how this work will be done.
Video

Video Treatment for Childhood Epilepsy Heats up Medical Marijuana Debate

In the United States, marijuana is classed as an illegal drug by the federal government. But nearly half the states have legalized it, to some degree. Proponents say some strains of marijuana might have exceptional health benefits, for treating pain or inflammation in chronic conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Shelley Schlender reports on a strain of medical marijuana developed in Colorado that is reputed to reduce seizures in childhood epilepsy
Video

Video Airbus Adds Metal 3D Printed Parts to New Jets

By the end of this year, European aircraft manufacturing consortium Airbus plans to deliver the first of its new, extra-wide-body passenger jets, the A350-XWB. Among other technological innovations, the new plane will also incorporate metal parts made in a 3-D printer. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video AIDS Conference Welcomes Exciting Developments in HIV Treatment, Prevention

Significant strides have been made in recent years toward the treatment and prevention of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. This year, at the International AIDS Conference, the AIDS community welcomed progress on a new pill that may prevent transmission of the deadly virus. VOA’s Anita Powell reports from Melbourne, Australia.
Video

Video IAEA: Iran Turns its Enriched Uranium Into Less Harmful Form

Iran has converted its stockpiles of enriched uranium into a less dangerous form that is more difficult to use for nuclear weapons, according to the United Nations’ Atomic Energy Agency. The move complies with an interim deal reached with Western powers on Iran's nuclear program last year, in exchange for easing of sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

AppleAndroid