News / Asia

China Increases Typhoon Aid to Philippines

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan walk amid ruins of their homes in Maraboth, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013.
Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan walk amid ruins of their homes in Maraboth, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013.
VOA News
China is increasing the amount of its relief aid to the typhoon-hit Philippines, days after it offered an initial donation much smaller than that of other global powers.

Foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang said Thursday that Beijing would send $1.6 million in additional aid to the Philippines.

"Several days ago we also decided to send 10 million RMB ($1.64 million) worth of humanitarian aid, including tents and blankets, to the Philippine people in the disaster zone. These include thousands of tents and hundreds of thousands of blankets," she said.

Earlier this week, the Beijing government, along with the Chinese Red Cross, pledged $200,000 in aid to the Philippines, which is struggling to deal with the aftermath of one of its worst natural disasters in decades.

That figure was significantly less than the aid offered by other nations. By comparison, Japan has offered $10 million in aid. Australia has donated $9.6 million. The United States, meanwhile, has given $20 million and its military is helping lead a massive relief effort.

Earlier this week, China's foreign ministry refused to say whether its aid packages were being influenced by Beijing's worsening territorial dispute with the Philippines.

The Philippines has accused China of using its rising military power to aggressively defend disputed areas in the energy-rich South China Sea. Last year, Chinese and Philippine ships were involved in a weeks-long standoff at the disputed Scarborough Shoal, an uninhabited archipelago.

An article in the Communist Party-controlled Global Times on Tuesday said the dispute should have nothing to do with China's decision to send relief aid to the Philippines. The paper said China's global image is of "vital importance" and warned of "great losses" if Beijing snubs Manila.

Thousands of people are feared dead after Typhoon Haiyan swept across the central Philippines late last week. The storm later moved to southern China, where it killed at least seven people.

Some information for this report was provided by AFP and Reuters.

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by: Dexter from: China
November 16, 2013 2:37 AM
It's a disaster,the people in P are suffering.China should aid them.But it's not a compete,south China is suffering from the typhoon too.That's unfair that all the cameras go to P but less people pay attention to south China.And the western politician are busy playing drama about the aiding amount.That's gross.They totally forgot that during the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake America aid $500000 and P aid NOTHING!


by: cf. gann from: America
November 15, 2013 5:14 AM
Its a duty as a human to help those in need. China is a mega power but they have not a heart. Greed out weighs honor anymore.China stand up, dieing people are calling.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
November 15, 2013 2:19 AM
I agree it makes no sense to compare the amounts of aids among offering countries. In addition, I think it is too easy to attribute the cause of any conducts to territorial disputes among concerning countires.


by: Jet
November 15, 2013 1:11 AM
China knows everyone is watching it.


by: ww from: seattle
November 15, 2013 12:37 AM
China is one of the victim of this Typhoon. Why there is not one here mention that?


by: woodin from: harrisburg
November 14, 2013 9:48 PM
Great for China and the Philippines, but a sad commentary on the aid they provide to their own country people during recent disasters!


by: jw from: wisconsin, usa
November 14, 2013 9:31 PM
China is the atagonist! They don't own the ocean, and should stop if they know what's good for them. Who needs their aid when they don't even respect their own peoples rights!

In Response

by: john from: bay area
November 14, 2013 10:37 PM
JW, stop your hypocritical statement, "They don't own the ocean". It's USA who acts like they own the ocean. The next time you open your diarrhea mouth, please wipe it.

In Response

by: Jimmy from: Orange County
November 14, 2013 10:29 PM
two words. "Guantanamo Bay"


by: Jacky from: Melbourne
November 14, 2013 9:17 PM
Sad to hear such disaster, unfortunately the world is warming up and more of such typhoon is expected.

I must point out that those reading this article should not take negative view of one country being less helpful over another country being more generous

Donations is donations, they should be seen as equal. Not all countries in the world would even lend a hand.


by: Watcher
November 14, 2013 1:07 PM
Ashamed of giving too little to antagonistic Philippine ? American even give money or aid to unfriendly country .

In Response

by: Maverick from: Philippines
November 14, 2013 10:36 PM
Please let us not equate AID with Politics.

People are suffering all over. Any AID no matter how paltry, makes a huge difference if is coming from the heart.

In Response

by: Jacky from: Melbourne
November 14, 2013 9:10 PM
I think we should make a statement out of any donations to the needy. Each country certainly have tried to help each other, regardless of political differences.

I think China was also appreciative on all the donations received during the Xian earthquake. Be it 1 Mil, 20K, 10K; a donation is a donation and no one is rightly to condemned it being too little or too much.

In Response

by: Gew
November 14, 2013 8:48 PM
Remember how the U.S. only gave China $20,000 in that devastating disaster in 1998?


by: Wang from: Beijing
November 14, 2013 11:16 AM
China should ashame ! Why not care ??

In Response

by: Mission from: Can
November 14, 2013 3:27 PM
The real shame is that China has 50% poverty and considerably less GDP per capita themselves, they continue to provide humanitarian aide to starving North Koreans while U.S.-led sanctions haven't, but it's all about getting on the front page in some parts of the world.

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