News / Asia

China Increases Typhoon Aid to Philippines

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan walk amid ruins of their homes in Maraboth, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013.
Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan walk amid ruins of their homes in Maraboth, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013.
VOA News
China is increasing the amount of its relief aid to the typhoon-hit Philippines, days after it offered an initial donation much smaller than that of other global powers.

Foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang said Thursday that Beijing would send $1.6 million in additional aid to the Philippines.

"Several days ago we also decided to send 10 million RMB ($1.64 million) worth of humanitarian aid, including tents and blankets, to the Philippine people in the disaster zone. These include thousands of tents and hundreds of thousands of blankets," she said.

Earlier this week, the Beijing government, along with the Chinese Red Cross, pledged $200,000 in aid to the Philippines, which is struggling to deal with the aftermath of one of its worst natural disasters in decades.

That figure was significantly less than the aid offered by other nations. By comparison, Japan has offered $10 million in aid. Australia has donated $9.6 million. The United States, meanwhile, has given $20 million and its military is helping lead a massive relief effort.

Earlier this week, China's foreign ministry refused to say whether its aid packages were being influenced by Beijing's worsening territorial dispute with the Philippines.

The Philippines has accused China of using its rising military power to aggressively defend disputed areas in the energy-rich South China Sea. Last year, Chinese and Philippine ships were involved in a weeks-long standoff at the disputed Scarborough Shoal, an uninhabited archipelago.

An article in the Communist Party-controlled Global Times on Tuesday said the dispute should have nothing to do with China's decision to send relief aid to the Philippines. The paper said China's global image is of "vital importance" and warned of "great losses" if Beijing snubs Manila.

Thousands of people are feared dead after Typhoon Haiyan swept across the central Philippines late last week. The storm later moved to southern China, where it killed at least seven people.

Some information for this report was provided by AFP and Reuters.

You May Like

At Khmer Rouge Court, Long-Awaited Verdict Approaches

First phase of trial, which is coming to an end, has focused on forced exodus of Phnom Penh in 1975 - and now many are hopeful justice will be served More

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities More

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

Downing of Malaysian airliner, allegations of cross-border shelling move information war in war-torn country to a new level More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
    Next 
by: Dexter from: China
November 16, 2013 2:37 AM
It's a disaster,the people in P are suffering.China should aid them.But it's not a compete,south China is suffering from the typhoon too.That's unfair that all the cameras go to P but less people pay attention to south China.And the western politician are busy playing drama about the aiding amount.That's gross.They totally forgot that during the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake America aid $500000 and P aid NOTHING!


by: cf. gann from: America
November 15, 2013 5:14 AM
Its a duty as a human to help those in need. China is a mega power but they have not a heart. Greed out weighs honor anymore.China stand up, dieing people are calling.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
November 15, 2013 2:19 AM
I agree it makes no sense to compare the amounts of aids among offering countries. In addition, I think it is too easy to attribute the cause of any conducts to territorial disputes among concerning countires.


by: Jet
November 15, 2013 1:11 AM
China knows everyone is watching it.


by: ww from: seattle
November 15, 2013 12:37 AM
China is one of the victim of this Typhoon. Why there is not one here mention that?


by: woodin from: harrisburg
November 14, 2013 9:48 PM
Great for China and the Philippines, but a sad commentary on the aid they provide to their own country people during recent disasters!


by: jw from: wisconsin, usa
November 14, 2013 9:31 PM
China is the atagonist! They don't own the ocean, and should stop if they know what's good for them. Who needs their aid when they don't even respect their own peoples rights!

In Response

by: john from: bay area
November 14, 2013 10:37 PM
JW, stop your hypocritical statement, "They don't own the ocean". It's USA who acts like they own the ocean. The next time you open your diarrhea mouth, please wipe it.

In Response

by: Jimmy from: Orange County
November 14, 2013 10:29 PM
two words. "Guantanamo Bay"


by: Jacky from: Melbourne
November 14, 2013 9:17 PM
Sad to hear such disaster, unfortunately the world is warming up and more of such typhoon is expected.

I must point out that those reading this article should not take negative view of one country being less helpful over another country being more generous

Donations is donations, they should be seen as equal. Not all countries in the world would even lend a hand.


by: Watcher
November 14, 2013 1:07 PM
Ashamed of giving too little to antagonistic Philippine ? American even give money or aid to unfriendly country .

In Response

by: Maverick from: Philippines
November 14, 2013 10:36 PM
Please let us not equate AID with Politics.

People are suffering all over. Any AID no matter how paltry, makes a huge difference if is coming from the heart.

In Response

by: Jacky from: Melbourne
November 14, 2013 9:10 PM
I think we should make a statement out of any donations to the needy. Each country certainly have tried to help each other, regardless of political differences.

I think China was also appreciative on all the donations received during the Xian earthquake. Be it 1 Mil, 20K, 10K; a donation is a donation and no one is rightly to condemned it being too little or too much.

In Response

by: Gew
November 14, 2013 8:48 PM
Remember how the U.S. only gave China $20,000 in that devastating disaster in 1998?


by: Wang from: Beijing
November 14, 2013 11:16 AM
China should ashame ! Why not care ??

In Response

by: Mission from: Can
November 14, 2013 3:27 PM
The real shame is that China has 50% poverty and considerably less GDP per capita themselves, they continue to provide humanitarian aide to starving North Koreans while U.S.-led sanctions haven't, but it's all about getting on the front page in some parts of the world.

Comments page of 2
    Next 

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukrainei
X
Al Pessin
July 31, 2014 8:13 PM
The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict in Gaza, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities. Probably the most important destination is the local bakery. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Gaza City.
Video

Video US-Funded Program Offers Honduran Children Alternative to Illegal Immigration

President Obama and Central American leaders recently agreed to come up with a plan to address poverty and crime in the region that is fueling the surge of young migrants trying to illegally enter the United States. VOA’s Brian Padden looks at one such program in Honduras - funded in part by the United States - which gives street kids not only food and safety but a chance for a better life without, crossing the border.
Video

Video 'Fab Lab' Igniting Revolution in Kenya

The University of Nairobi’s Science and Technology Park is banking on 3-D prototyping to spark a manufacturing revolution in the country. Lenny Ruvaga has more for from Nairobi's so-called “FabLab” for VOA.
Video

Video Gazans in Shelled School Sought Shelter

Israel's air and ground assault against Hamas-led fighters in Gaza has forced many Palestinians to flee their homes, seeking safety. But safe places are hard to find, as VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jabaliya.
Video

Video Rapid Spread of Ebola in West Africa Prompts Global Alert

Across West Africa, health officials are struggling to keep up with what the World Health Organization describes as the worst ebola outbreak on record. The virus has killed hundreds of people this year. U.S. President Barack Obama and other world leaders are watching the developments closely as they weigh what actions, if any, are needed to help contain the disease.
Video

Video Michelle Obama: Young Africans Need to Embrace Women's Rights

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama urged some of Africa's best and brightest to advocate for women's rights in their home countries. As VOA's Pam Dockins explains, Obama spoke to some 500 participants of the Young African Leaders Initiative, a six-week U.S.-based training and development program.
Video

Video Immigrant Influx on Texas Border Heats Up Political Debate

Immigrants from Central America continue to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in south Texas, seeking asylum in the United States, as officials grapple with ways to deal with the problem and provide shelter for thousands of minors among the illegal border crossers. As VOA's Greg Flakus reports from Houston, the issue is complicated by internal U.S. politics and U.S. relations with the troubled nations that immigrants are fleeing.
Video

Video Study: Latino Students Most Segregated in California

Even though legal school segregation ended in the United States 60 years ago, one study finds segregation still occurs in the U.S. based on income and race. The University of California Los Angeles Civil Rights Project finds that students in California are more segregated by race than ever before, especially Latinos. Elizabeth Lee reports for VOA from Los Angeles.

AppleAndroid