News / Asia

China Mourns Victims of Plane Crash

The parents (bottom) of Wang Linjia, one of the two girls killed during the Asiana Airlines plane crash on Saturday, cry at a middle school in Quzhou, Zhejiang province, July 7, 2013. An emergency vehicle rushing to the scene of the Asiana Airlines crash
The parents (bottom) of Wang Linjia, one of the two girls killed during the Asiana Airlines plane crash on Saturday, cry at a middle school in Quzhou, Zhejiang province, July 7, 2013. An emergency vehicle rushing to the scene of the Asiana Airlines crash
TEXT SIZE - +
VOA News
— News of Saturday's crash of Asiana Flight 214 at the San Francisco International Airport was the top story in China on Monday, with details on the two Chinese schoolmates killed in the crash and questions about the causes of the wreck.

Ye Mengyuan, 16, and Wang Linjia, 17, had boarded on the plane in Shanghai as part of a group of 34 students and teachers from a high school in Zhejiang province. They were heading to a summer camp organized by the school to visit universities in the United States, Chinese media reported.

The two schoolmates were sitting near the tail section of the plane that broke off, and their bodies were found outside the plane wreckage.

Exact circumstances of deaths remain unclear

An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 plane is seen in this aerial image after it crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport in California on July 6, 2013.An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 plane is seen in this aerial image after it crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport in California on July 6, 2013.
x
An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 plane is seen in this aerial image after it crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport in California on July 6, 2013.
An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 plane is seen in this aerial image after it crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport in California on July 6, 2013.
The exact circumstances of their deaths are still under investigation. U.S. media reported that an autopsy was scheduled for Monday to determine whether one of the two victims died as a result of the plane crash, or was run over by rescue vehicles as they approached the scene.

When asked whether the Chinese government would request an investigation on the circumstances of the teenagers' death, the spokeswoman from China's Foreign Ministry said that her office was still trying to verify the situation, but added that China's President Xi Jinping was deeply concerned about the casualties.

“In compliance with Xi Jinping's directives, the Foreign Ministry as well as diplomatic missions in the United States and in South Korea will provide assistance, arrange placement and deal with the aftermath of the accident,” said Hua Chunying.

Many students looking to study abroad

The Beijing News described Ye as a “multi-talented” student. She was the school representative for English language class and Physical Education, she excelled at playing piano as well as dancing Latin music.

Local media reported that Wang had been class monitor for three years, and she was active in her school's radio and television station.

In recent years, an increasing number of Chinese students have chosen to go abroad for higher education. American schools are among the most popular destinations for many who are eager to avoid the “gaokao,” the very rigorous test for access to Chinese Universities.

Local news reports said that the group from Zhejiang's Jiangshan High School planned to visit Silicon Valley, Stanford University and University of California's campuses in Los Angeles and Berkeley.

Instructor Yu Yinfeng has been helping Chinese students prepare for universities abroad for six years. He says that summer courses and university scouting has become a very common occurrence for students interested in applying to universities outside of China.

“More and more students are trying to attend some summer schools, or some courses during the summer,” he says, “At the same time they do it also for school trip, they can attend the universities they'd like to apply to.”

It is unclear whether Ye and Wang planned on applying to school in the United States, but Yu says that based on the reports on their many academic achievements the two are representative of the kinds of students who pursue academic study abroad.

Crash investigation

Authorities in the United States announced that they have begun a full investigation into the crash, which happened as the aircraft was landing at San Francisco International Airport.

So far there is no indication of mechanical failure. Eye witnesses said that the plane was flying at an unusually low altitude and that it tilted unnaturally just before the crash.

Choi Jung-ho, head of South Korean's Transport Ministry's aviation policy bureau, said on Monday that the flight's co-pilot - Lee Kang Kuk - was transitioning from flying other types of Boeing and had 43 hours' experience flying Boeing 777.

Online, most messages in China about the accident mourned the death of the two teenagers, but many users expressed anger, suggesting that the co-pilot was under qualified for the job.

“To have a pilot in training fly a plane is like having a doctor in training do a surgery,” one user called Goodbye_Lullaby2010 wrote on her microblog account. “They just play with people's lives.”

Asiana Airlines, which operated the flight, is the second largest carrier in South Korea. Its CEO, Yoon Young-doo apologized to the families on Sunday.

The plane carried 291 passengers and 16 crew members. A total of 182 people were injured, dozens of them were in serious conditions.

You May Like

Wikipedia Proves Useful for Tracking Flu

Technique gave better results than Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Google’s Flu Trends More

Turkish Law Gives Spy Agency Controversial Powers

Parliament approves legislation to bolster powers of intelligence service, which government claims is necessary to modernize and deal with new threats Turkey faces More

Video Face of American Farmer Changing

Average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: jonathan huang from: canada
July 08, 2013 10:03 PM
RIP. My heart goes to all their families.


by: Anonymous
July 08, 2013 4:49 PM
the china government will real to help for the breakup families or survivors? it's an kidding. the photo just a joke to show to foreign media.

In Response

by: Emma from: China
July 08, 2013 11:58 PM
I think your opinion is wrong. I believe that our country will help with the survivors .You need evidence to prove what you said.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Face of American Farmer is Changingi
X
Mike Osborne
April 18, 2014
The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid