News / Asia

China Province Offers up to $80,000 for Tips on Terrorists

Guangdong province, China
Guangdong province, China
Reuters

Police in China's southern Guangdong province are offering up to $80,000 for tips about terrorism suspects and potential attacks, state media said on Sunday, announcing some of the biggest rewards yet in a nationwide “anti-terror” campaign.

China launched the year-long crackdown in May after a series of attacks that authorities have blamed on separatists and Islamist militants from the westerly Xinjiang region, home to the Muslim Uighur ethnic minority.

Under the Guangdong plan, informants' rewards will be based on the “value of the information in preventing terrorist attacks or catching suspects,” the official Xinhua news agency said.

“Police will also offer rewards to those who provide tips on illegal activities related to preaching extremism and making videos or books that teach terrorist attacks,” Xinhua said.

The Public Security Ministry said police who failed to protect informants and keep their identities confidential would face punishment.

Rewards offered

Numerous regions and provinces around China have offered money for tip-offs in recent months.

In Xinjiang, where a suicide bombing killed 39 people at a market in the regional capital Urumqi in May, police have offered money for tips on everything from “violent terrorism training” to growing long beards, as authorities try to root out those they say are trying to establish an independent state called East Turkestan.

Around 200 people have died in unrest in Xinjiang in the past year or so, the government says, including 13 people shot dead by police while attacking a police station in June.

In March, 29 people were stabbed to death at a train station in the southwestern city of Kunming.

Exiled Uighur groups and human rights activists say repressive government policies in Xinjiang, including controls on Islam and on Uighur culture, have provoked unrest, a claim Beijing denies.

Xinjiang, resource-rich and strategically located on the borders of central Asia, is crucial to meeting China's growing energy needs.

Analysts say that most of the economic benefits  have gone to the Han Chinese, the country's biggest ethnic group, and that this has stoked resentment among Uighurs. 

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Comments
     
by: Frankie Fook-lunLeung from: Los Angeles
July 17, 2014 12:09 PM
One issue which most countries including China and USA is try not to radicalize reliogus factions and turn them into terrorists. How to do it? First, respect their religious practices and expect them to reciprocate. Second, target those who either train terrorists or potential recruits. Thirdly, don't use the excuse of steming out terrorists to oppress minorities.


by: oldlamb from: Guangzhou
July 14, 2014 4:28 AM
Minorities usally live in remote regions.To be frank,it is hard to improve their life during a short term. Because they are not only lack of education,but also transportation, and the competence of the competition in the modernized society.


by: NG from: Canada
July 14, 2014 1:42 AM
The biggest terrorists are Japanese fascists and Nazi during WWII since they are not ONLY politics, they have committed anti-humanity crimes during WWII. It is a shame that some people here didn't even know that.

In Taiwan, Japanese used biological weapons and toxic gases to kill anti-fascist people, current taiwanese may not know this truth well, Japanese fascists have also done terrible crime in mainland China, Korean and other countries in WWII. Are Japanese fascists terrorists in WWII?obvious yes.

Extremism are main reasons for current terrorists in the US, china and in the world.


by: sara from: taiwan
July 13, 2014 9:37 PM
losers are always in the wrong. Communists do know it!


by: Frankie Fook-lun from: Los Angeles
July 13, 2014 2:20 PM
Terrorists do not have words written on their foreheads, so the Chinese say. Chinese Communists in the pre-1949 era were considered terrorists too. They operated in small cells to undermine the government. Were they terrorists?

In Response

by: Wangchuk from: NY
July 17, 2014 11:00 AM
You hit the nail on the head. The KMT branded the CCP & its Red Army as bandits, criminals, and rebels. Terrorism wasn't a popular word back then but the KMT would have used that word too. It's undisputed that the CCP used armed force to overthrow the Chinese Govt.

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