News / Asia

    China Rejects US Charges Telecoms Pose Security Threat

    A Huawei logo is seen above the company's exhibition pavilion during the CommunicAsia information and communications technology trade show in Singapore on June 19, 2012.
    A Huawei logo is seen above the company's exhibition pavilion during the CommunicAsia information and communications technology trade show in Singapore on June 19, 2012.
    Shannon Sant
    BEIJING — China has rejected a U.S. Congressional report accusing two major Chinese telecommunications companies of posing a security threat to the United States.
     
    The draft report from U.S. lawmakers said American companies should avoid doing business with China’s largest phone equipment companies, Huawei and ZTE, out of concern government influence over the companies could pose a security risk to the United States.
     
    Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei rejected that claim, saying Chinese companies are not a security threat to the United States, as the report alleged.
     
    He said China’s telecom companies have developed their international business based on market economy principles. He said their investment in the United States embodies the mutually beneficial nature of Sino-American economic and trade relations. He said China hopes the U.S. Congress will set aside prejudices and respect facts.

    The Congressional report
     
    The Congressional report’s findings came after a nearly year long probe into the companies. The draft report cited industry experts and former Huawei employees alleging immigration violations by the company, bribery, corruption and industrial espionage.
     
    Huawei executives deny the allegations. They say the company has a very good track record in network security and would not engage in the illegal behavior described in the committee’s report.
     
    House lawmakers also warned that technology in Chinese-manufactured phone components could allow Beijing authorities to intercept high level communications, gather intelligence and shut down network systems during national emergencies.  
     
    During hearings into the issue last month, Jan Schakowsky, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said the investigation raised many questions that remain unanswered, despite testimonies from senior executives of both ZTE and Huawei
     
    “I know that the Intelligence Committee asked for a number of pieces of information, that it’s been hard to get or it hasn’t gotten, so it’s been difficult to confirm or discredit some of the questions that have been raised,” said Schakowsky.
     
    The report said Huawei and ZTE did not provide documentation and detailed information on their corporate structure, financial arrangements and relationships with the Chinese government.
     
    The committee said the United States should block mergers and acquisitions with Huawei and ZTE and that the U.S. government should ban the use of any components made by the two firms in its computer systems.

    China's telecom giants

    Huawei has rapidly grown to become the world’s second largest telecommunication equipment manufacturer, with operations in 140 countries.  ZTE is the world’s fourth largest mobile phone maker.
     
    Huawei employs 1,700 people in the United States. Revenues there rose to $1.3 billion in 2011. But the Congressional report may limit both companies’ expansion in the domestic market.
     
    The report’s findings will likely also become an issue in the final weeks of the U.S. presidential campaign in which both candidates have said they will stop Chinese trade violations.

    You May Like

    S. African Farmer Goes From 'Voice in the Wilderness' to Sought-After Expert

    Margarest Roberts has authored more than 40 books on subjects like organic farming, urban agriculture, herbs and ‘superfoods'

    Millennial Men Prefer Bucks Over Beauty

    U.S. men aged 18 to 34 say the finances of a potential significant other are more important than her looks

    Multimedia Lebanese Clown Troupe Marks Valentine's Day Amid Stink

    Activists resort to unusual approaches to raise public awareness of country’s ongoing trash crisis

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Valsor from: Mars
    October 10, 2012 12:21 AM
    Chinese government press releases are not to be trusted.

    by: Hosyo Gatoko from: Japan
    October 09, 2012 5:14 PM
    Chinese are treacherous stink people... America, do not trust these people!!! in Japan we know that the American democratic party is for sale... but beware who buys... China look at us and America as enemies... we hate them, and America be careful not to trust them...

    by: kaka from: Vietnam
    October 09, 2012 12:36 PM
    Any1 works with china will receive deficit, obviously, sooner or later

    by: john from: german
    October 08, 2012 10:54 PM
    Obviously, it is just a protectionism for their own firms, nothing more.
    In Response

    by: yisi from: China
    October 10, 2012 8:50 AM
    Is china become your enemy?
    In Response

    by: Hoang from: Canada
    October 10, 2012 6:29 AM
    Why don't German telecom company try going into China. It is not protectionism when China poses a security threat. How do you think China attain nuclear weapons?
    World war 2 is over. The U.S. is not the enemy.

    by: Habi from: Canada
    October 08, 2012 3:27 PM
    US should have the know-hows to identify specific security-related telecomm issues, why bother to set prejudice on Chinese companies? American should be more confident about its own technologies and know-hows instead of blow other competitors out of America. US and China should cooperate and talk more rather than just try to eliminate Chinese companies from America. If US doesn't pose a threat on China, why concern China threat so much?
    In Response

    by: Hoang from: Canada
    October 10, 2012 6:23 AM
    If you are a telecom company from the West, try going into China.
    You can't trust Chinese products.

    by: Keith from: California
    October 08, 2012 11:21 AM
    Nothing new. I can almost imagine that Space shuttle, Drone, & Jumbo jets soon to be made in China. Then we will finally learned that cheap Chinese contract will be very costly in terms of our children's future and security. Maybe it is already too late.

    by: nps_ca from: California
    October 08, 2012 10:50 AM
    Absolute BUNK by protectionist Washington. This has happened both under Republican and Democrat Administrations.

    Even the UK Signals Agency has FULL access to all source code from both and has deemed NO security issues.

    This is dumb politicians trying to grasp something they know nothing about. While the rest of the world deploys networks with both ZTE and Huawei we have to use other (NON US) vendors who charge an arm and a leg which means cell phone, DSL, Cable rates here reflect these higher charges.

    by: Hisham
    October 08, 2012 10:25 AM
    Anyone else think the title is confusing or makes no sense? Its at least missing a punctuation mark or something!
    In Response

    by: Chuck Spohr from: USA
    October 08, 2012 3:05 PM
    The headline would be fuller if the words "That" were before "Telecom" and "a" before "Security Threat."

    by: Swagat Acharya from: India
    October 08, 2012 10:24 AM
    Numerous other products which people use everyday, such as computers, cell phones and electronic equipment, are all made in China. The only difference is that these are owned by American firms. If these security threats did indeed exist then the United States surely has the know how to identify these and would have identified these specifically. The way I say it, this is just an excuse to prevent American firms from being eliminated by foreign competition. So much for capitalism.
    In Response

    by: BBB&T from: 33025
    October 08, 2012 11:13 AM
    They own a piece of everything in China. If you have a factory in China then the Gov owns you. Period. Besides they steal everything. I would not trust them as far as I can throw a bus.
    In Response

    by: Mitchel Eisenstein
    October 08, 2012 11:06 AM
    The point is, we dont mind capitalism when it actually is capitalism. In china, the marriage between capitalism and communism results in an attempt by the communist dicatorship to rule the world. Think of how horrible it is to have to live in a china of ONE VOICE, and if you dare to challenge the status quo you and your family are executed. No Swagat, we must challange the Chinese Government or this world shall be ruled by a ruthless, soulless dictatorship. Indian capitalism is more my style, despite the corruption.

    by: Alan from: Asheville, NC
    October 08, 2012 9:53 AM
    I saw the 60 Minutes segment and thought it the absurd dribble of a bunch of Washington paranoids.
    In Response

    by: yoko from: Japan
    October 08, 2012 5:10 PM
    Wow. So many 中人 trolls ... dont ostrichize your views. Look hard and at all facts before you. If any person here owns lets say a Dell, you KNOW youre electronically compromised. Espionage had been around long before time become BC/AD. I am glaf a govt would be worried for its people security. Anyone posting otherwise is anti-that particular country due to lining his own pockets. Live daily your best, be aware and deal -- and vote on issues that affect your life.
    In Response

    by: Hu Jintao from: your house, in china
    October 08, 2012 10:44 AM
    so says the chinese government troll with their incorrect and blatantly obvious chinese english grammer.
    give it up before you make a fool of yourself!
    In Response

    by: bob goodwin from: florence oregon
    October 08, 2012 10:18 AM
    during the olympics cell phones were at risk in china.
    the story is the phones can be turned on and emptied of thier data.
    if the chinese have long term plans commo security can be a target. i think its possible

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Valentine's Day Stinks for Lebanese Clownsi
    X
    February 09, 2016 8:04 PM
    This weekend, on Valentine's Day in Lebanon, love is not the only thing in the air. More than half a year after the country's trash crisis began, the stink of uncollected garbage remains on the streets. Step forward "Clown Me In," a group of clowns who use their skills for activism. Before the most romantic day of the year the clowns have released their unusual take on love in Lebanon -- in a bid to keep the pressure up and get the trash off the streets. John Owens reports from Beirut.
    Video

    Video Valentine's Day Stinks for Lebanese Clowns

    This weekend, on Valentine's Day in Lebanon, love is not the only thing in the air. More than half a year after the country's trash crisis began, the stink of uncollected garbage remains on the streets. Step forward "Clown Me In," a group of clowns who use their skills for activism. Before the most romantic day of the year the clowns have released their unusual take on love in Lebanon -- in a bid to keep the pressure up and get the trash off the streets. John Owens reports from Beirut.
    Video

    Video Rocky Year Ahead for Nigeria Amid Oil Price Crash

    The global fall in the price of oil has rattled the economies of many petroleum exporters, and Africa’s oil king Nigeria is no exception. As Chris Stein reports from Lagos, analysts are predicting a rough year ahead for the continent’s top producer of crude.
    Video

    Video Foreign Policy Weighs Heavy for Some US Voters

    VOA talks to protesters in Manchester, New Hampshire who sound off on foreign policy issues such as the Guantanamo Bay Prison, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Middle East Affairs and national security.
    Video

    Video 'No Means No' Program Targets Sexual Violence in Kenya

    The organizers of an initiative to reduce and stop rape in the informal settlements around Kenya's capital say their program is having marked success. Girls are taking self-defense classes while the boys are learning how to protect the girls and respect them. Lenny Ruvaga reports from Nairobi.
    Video

    Video New Hampshire Voters Are Independent, Mindful of History

    Once every four years, the northeastern state of New Hampshire becomes the center of the U.S. political universe with its first-in-the-nation presidential primary. What's unusual about New Hampshire is how seriously the voters take their role and the responsibility of being among the first to weigh in on the candidates.
    Video

    Video Chocolate Lovers Get a Sweet History Lesson

    Observed in many countries around the world, Valentine’s Day is sometimes celebrated with chocolate festivals. But at a festival near Washington, the visitors experience a bit more than a sugar rush. They go on a sweet journey through history. VOA’s June Soh takes us to the festival.
    Video

    Video 'Smart' Bandages Could Heal Wounds More Quickly

    Simple bandages are usually seen as the first line of attack in healing small to moderate wounds and burns. But scientists say new synthetic materials with embedded microsensors could turn bandages into a much more valuable tool for emergency physicians. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Bhutanese Refugees in New Hampshire Closely Watching Primary Election

    They fled their country and lived in refugee camps in neighboring Nepal for decades before being resettled in the northeastern U.S. state of New Hampshire -- now the focus of the U.S. presidential contest. VOA correspondent Aru Pande spoke with members of the Bhutanese community, including new American citizens, about the campaign and the strong anti-immigrant rhetoric of some of the candidates.
    Video

    Video Researchers Use 3-D Printer to Produce Transplantable Body Parts

    Human organ transplants have become fairly common around the world in the past few decades. Researchers at various universities are coordinating their efforts to find solutions -- including teams at the University of Pennsylvania and Rice University in Houston that are experimenting with a 3-D printer -- to make blood vessels and other structures for implant. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Houston, they are also using these artificial body parts to seek ways of defeating cancerous tumors.
    Video

    Video Helping the Blind 'See' Great Art

    There are 285 million blind and visually impaired people in the world who are unable to enjoy visual art at a museum. One New York photographer is trying to fix this situation by making tangible copies of the world’s masterpieces. VOA correspondent Victoria Kupchinetsky was there as visually impaired people got a feel for great art. Joy Wagner narrates her report.
    Video

    Video German Artists to Memorialize Refugees With Life Jacket Exhibit

    Sold in every kind of shop in some Turkish port towns, life jackets have become a symbol of the refugee crisis that brought a million people to Europe in 2015.  On the shores of Lesbos, Greece, German artists collect discarded life jackets as they prepare an art installation they plan to display in Germany.  For VOA, Hamada Elrasam has this report from Lesbos, Greece.
    Video

    Video E-readers Help Ease Africa's Book Shortage

    Millions of people in Africa can't read, and there's a chronic shortage of books. A non-profit organization called Worldreader is trying to help change all that one e-reader at a time. VOA’s Deborah Block tells us about a girls' school in Nairobi, Kenya where Worldreader is making a difference.
    Video

    Video Genius Lets World Share Its Knowledge

    Inspired by crowdsourcing companies like Wikipedia, Genius allows anyone to edit anything on the web, using its web annotation tool
    Video

    Video In Philippines, Mixed Feelings About Greater US Military Presence

    In the Philippines, some who will be directly affected by a recent Supreme Court decision clearing the way for more United States troop visits are having mixed reactions.  The increased rotations come at a time when the Philippines is trying to build up its military in the face of growing maritime assertiveness from China.  From Bahile, Palawan on the coast of the South China Sea, Simone Orendain has this story.