News / Asia

China: Japan, Allies Risk 'Long-Term Damage' Over Islands

China: Japan, Allies Risk 'Long-Term Damage' Over Islandsi
May 03, 2013 7:24 PM
China continues to accuse Japan of provoking disputes over contested islands in the East China Sea. As VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns reports, the Obama administration opposes any unilateral change to Japanese administration of the islands.
China: Japan, Allies Risk 'Long-Term Damage' Over Islands
China continues to accuse Japan of provoking disputes over contested islands in the East China Sea. The Obama administration opposes any unilateral change to Japanese administration of the islands.

China says Japanese activists near the disputed islands are worsening tensions between Beijing and Tokyo.

"It's Japan that stirred up and exacerbated tensions on the islands issue. It's also Japan that took direct and threatening actions. These are very evident facts that say who is right or wrong," said Chinese Ambassador to the United States Cui Tiankai.

The potentially mineral-rich islands, known as "Diaoyu" in China and "Senkaku" in Japan, are administered by Tokyo - a status quo that Washington backs.

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said any change that raises tensions could threaten regional stability. "Therefore, the United States opposes any unilateral or coercive action that seeks to undermine Japan's administrative control," he said.

And Beijing sees that as Washington siding with Tokyo, said Cato Institute analyst Justin Logan.

"The American position, I think, has been confusing and unhelpful. We say that we don't take a position on whether the islands are Japanese, but we take a position that they are covered by a treaty with Japan," said Logan.

A U.S.-Japan defense treaty covers any attack on Japanese-administered territory. Chinese ambassador Cui said Japan and its allies risk "long-term damage" over the islands.

"Some Japanese politicians take up these actions like lifting a rock, only to drop it on their own feet. We hope that other parties do not lift up rocks for the Japanese, and we hope even more that these rocks don't end up falling on their own feet," said Cui.

Washington wants better relations with Beijing, but the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey, said he has told Chinese officials that does not mean weakening ties with Japan.

"Would we trade off our relationship with Japan in order to have a stronger relationship with China? The answer is 'No,'" said Dempsey.

Japan is protesting a Chinese warship locking weapons-fire-control radar on one of its patrols near the islands. U.S.-Chinese relations are a constant source of anxiety in Japan, said American Enterprise Institute analyst Michael Auslin.

"They don't want a China and the United States that are at loggerheads because that's bad for Japan. On the other hand, they don't want a China and the United States that suddenly become 'best friends forever' and that would leave Japan as the odd-man-out of that arrangement," said Auslin.

Chinese officials also are unhappy about June military drills between Japan and the United States that will involve recapturing an isolated island. U.S. officials say the scenario is not aimed at any specific country.

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Comment Sorting
by: Carl from: Canada
May 08, 2013 11:08 AM
"Chinese officials also are unhappy about June military drills between Japan and the United States that will involve recapturing an isolated island. U.S. officials say the scenario is not aimed at any specific country."

No of course not, it's intended for capturing Atlantis the lost city from a race of genetically superior race of humans awakening from hibernation.

by: J.Damer from: United States
May 05, 2013 12:27 PM
China is already conducting cyberwarfare against the United States. China's stated goal is the remove the US as the dominant strategic power in the Pacific, so that they bully and can take territory from their smaller Asian neighbors. Chinese harping on WWII Japan is a cover for their own militant expansionist agenda. China poses a fascist and nationalist threat to the world and the US today right now. 70 year old history is irrelevant especially since Japan has been a US ally since WWII ended.

May 05, 2013 5:53 AM
China's economic success has given momentum to its military development and fuelled its territorial ambitions.A strong,ruthless and unlaw-biding China is a threat to world peace.China should learn to be contented with what it has got.By using force to impose territorial claims on areas that belong to their neighbours,causes concern and panic throughout the region,and would eventually lead to wars.Russia,America and India should show permanent presence in East China Sea and South China Sea,to remind the Chinese that these are Internation Waters,and they should not resort to any dirty tactical tricks to claim these areas as theirs.A restoration of a glorious Chinese past means that China's ultimate aims are to seize the Russian Far East,Korea and North Vietnam,which at some times in the past were seized by force by China

by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
May 04, 2013 6:23 PM
China has no right to the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands currently administered by Japan. Any military threat to these islands by China is a threat world peace.
In Response

by: Cho enlai from: China
May 06, 2013 9:54 AM
Senkaku group of islands are belongs to Japan. Contstructed development for more than 200 years is a clear evidence. China has no evidence that the islands belongs to them. History doesn't say the owned that islands.
In Response

by: David from: Washington
May 05, 2013 10:36 AM
China don't want any war in anywhere. "Diao yu" island is belongs to China since hundreds years ago. Remember, China love peace, Chinese people love peace.
In Response

by: Justice from: China
May 05, 2013 5:57 AM
Things is reversal. Diaoyu islands inherently belongs to China.Japan burglared and occupied them through U.S. The U.S. is liable for them. We can not understand sovereign and control may separate forever by U.S .

by: ECB
May 04, 2013 2:58 AM
China operates as the strong shall live the weak shall die. In the past China got harassed by the Western countries. China still remember that.
Now China plays the same by using millitary force to invade islands ocuppied by Southeast Asia countries.
Don't tell people who right or wrong Mr. chinese Ambassador to the United States Cui Tiankai. Go correct yourself first!

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
May 04, 2013 1:03 AM
Diaoyu island belongs to China!
Japan back off!
In Response

by: fefe from: Vietnam
May 04, 2013 9:06 PM
PLEASE see what China is doing!

by: Igor from: Russia
May 04, 2013 12:57 AM
China is notorious for carrying fire in one hand and water in the other. China has the tradition of invading lands and seas from others in history and spreading lies at the same time. China is a vast country today because it has been a pirate for thousands of years.
In Response

by: cho from: china
May 06, 2013 6:07 PM
If your source is Wikipedia. Then you're 120% incorrect. Even Taiwan early inhabitant are Astro-Asian people the The Dutch, before the Han Chinese immigrate to the Islands. Ivatan of Philippines are the true Inhabitant of Taiwan. In Senkaku the clear picture 200 years ago Japanese establish a community in the Islands. China has no clear evidence except the Cairo treaty in which excluded any area that not belongs to China.

China is land grabber of the 21st century when everyone is International law abiding Country. China is belong to super power that should be a sober country and respect the International law which he is one of the signatory.The 9 dash Imaginary line that draw by China's previous dictator is considered imaginary. No real basis.
In Response

by: Fred from: USA
May 04, 2013 5:27 PM
Igor, your words seem to point to Japan. Who invaded China in 1937? Who bombed Perl Harbor? Who created the raping of Nanking and even earlier, who colonized Korea and who fought a war with Russian in 1904 and lost half of Sakhalin island as the result?
I recommend you to read Wikipedia article at for the long list. And Japanese now worshiped those criminals in Yasukuni Shrine. You may read recent news that such shrine list 14 class A war criminals and more than 1000 class B and C war criminals. Japanese politicians visited the shrine regularly. This year, a record of 168 Japanese congress men visited this infamous shrine just a week ago. Japan is a shameless country. Don't show sympathy to them at all.

by: Samurai from: Japan
May 04, 2013 12:19 AM
China has no time to provoke Japan and USA. China should take measures for air pollution, leaders' corruption, economical divide, poutry flu, rat meat, contageous pigs thrown into the river, and so many other domestic problems. Otherwise, China will never be respected as a civilized country.

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