Chinese Swimmer Wins Second Gold After Doping Allegations Dismissed

China's Ye Shiwen swims to win the women's 200m individual medley final during the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Aquatics Centre July 31, 2012.
China's Ye Shiwen swims to win the women's 200m individual medley final during the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Aquatics Centre July 31, 2012.
VOA News
Chinese swimmer Ye Shiwen set an Olympic record Tuesday by winning her second gold medal at the London Games, adding the 200-meter individual medley title to a world-record performance in the 400 individual medley that sparked suspicions of doping. 
The International Olympic Committee and her fellow swimmers came to her defense after U.S. coach John Leonard suggested the 16-year-old's first victory was too "unbelievable and "disturbing."  
"History in our sport will tell you that every time we see something, and I will put quotation marks around this, "unbelievable," history shows us that it turns out later on there was doping involved," Leonard told The Guardian on Monday.
China blasted what it called "biased" doping allegations against one of its young swimming stars.
"I think it is not proper to single Chinese swimmers out once they produce good results," said Jiang Zhixue, who heads the anti-doping agency of China's General Administration of Sport. "Some people are just biased."  Jiang said Chinese athletes, including the swimmers, have taken nearly 100 drug tests since they arrived in London. 
The 16-year-old Chinese swimming sensation set aside her feelings to score another win Tuesday.
Ye won gold in the women's 400-meter individual medley Saturday with an unprecedented performance, shattering the previous world record by more than a second. She swam the final 50-meter lap faster than American Ryan Lochte did in the men's race.
Leonard compared Ye's performance to that of Irish swimmer Michelle Smith, who tested positive for performance enhancing drugs following her victory in the same race during the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.
Jiang said her success was the result of an "advanced training method and hard work," adding that China never questioned American swimmer Michael Phelps when he won eight gold medals during the 2008 Beijing Olympics.
In the past, Chinese swimmers have been tainted by high-profile doping scandals, most notably in the 1994 and 1998 world championships. 
The International Olympic Committee's medical commission chief, Arne Ljungqvist, has said Ye should not be thought of as guilty unless it has been determined that she has tested positive for a banned substance.
But Ross Tucker, a South Africa-based sports medicine researcher, says there is good reason to be skeptical about Ye's performance, which was seven seconds faster than her time in last year's world championship final.
"History has told us that we need to regard these kinds of amazing performances with some suspicion," Tucker told VOA, saying that those who follow the sport closely are well aware of the history of Chinese doping scandals.
"Since 1990, 40 Chinese swimmers have tested positive for banned substances," he said. "That's three times higher than the second worst offender."

Photo Gallery: Olympics Day 3

  • Chinese gymnast Chen Yibing performs on the rings during the Artistic Gymnastic men's team final, July 30, 2012.
  • Michael Phelps of the U.S. reacts after taking third place in his men's 200m butterfly heat at the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Aquatics Centre.
  • The South Korean men's cycling team during a training session at the Velopark in London, July 30, 2012.
  • Sweden's Linda Algotsson rides La Fair as she competes in the Eventing Cross Country equestrian event in Greenwich Park.
  • Micronesia's Manuel Minginfel drops weights on the men's 62Kg Group B weightlifting competition.
  • Czech Republic's Kvitova returns to China's Peng in their women's singles tennis match at the All England Lawn Tennis Club.
  • South Korea's Shin A Lam reacts after being defeated by Germany's Britta Heidemann during their women's epee individual semifinal fencing competition at the ExCel venue.
  • China's team celebrates after the men's gymnastics team final in the North Greenwich Arena.
  • Germany's Jasmin Schornberg competes in the women's K-1 kayak slalom heats at the Lee Valley White Water Center.
  • China's Cao Yuan and Zhang Yanquan perform a dive in the men's synchronised 10m platform final at the Aquatics Centre.
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Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
by: river from: zambia
August 02, 2012 10:07 AM
hhh,now,if ye shi wen come from US,what will say

by: terrain from: china
August 01, 2012 10:09 PM
Why the United States won the gold medal is granted, while China won the gold medal has to be suspect is serving a doping?

by: Randall Scott from: USA
August 01, 2012 5:03 AM
The girl shouldn't be falsely accused. She should be given the benefit of the doubt, until testing proves otherwise. If she hasn't been given drugs, then she deserves to be recognised for her wonderful talent.

by: jJoseph Hoo from: Cos Cob, CT, USA
August 01, 2012 3:27 AM
This is a very bad report, unbalanced, biased. You quoted too many accfusations and few defenses of Ye. U.S. Government pays you to say bad things about Chinese communist government, not innocent Chinese people.
In Response

by: Anonymous
August 02, 2012 10:54 AM
U r really an American!I respect you for your just remarks!
In Response

by: terrain from: China
August 01, 2012 9:27 PM
yes,you are right

by: Harry from: China
August 01, 2012 1:57 AM
supicions should be based on the concret proofs. Otherwise it's unfair to bite a talent swimmer like a barking dog without any scientfifc tested proofs. Do you believe that a man who has ever do something wrong means he will do everything wrong all his life? let's clean and open our eyes to wait the true result later. Try to be modest and humble , not be always jealous to others' achievement, but to impove ourselves, no matter the swimmer who comes from China , USA or any other countries.

by: Anonymous
July 31, 2012 10:56 PM
You Coward!! I feel very sorry for you!! Why don't you accuse Phelps? He won 8 gold medals in Beijing Olympic, using your logic, it didn't make sense!

by: Maddie from: California
July 31, 2012 10:19 PM
Ok first of all "geishas" are Japanese. So in your attempt to paint US "whiteman" favoritism (which I do not deny fully exists in the US), you've basically shown how ignorant and racist you are. Good job.

Second of all this chick was 7 seconds better than the last major race. Unlike other swimmers like Michael Phleps and Ryan Lochte who have a consistent record of performing near and around their current times. Even one second is a huge deal in swimming. Why do you think they shave every hair of their body and wear funny suits? It's not for several seconds, but for a few tenths of a second.

Third China has a huge reputation for cheating and you can't always detect blood doping. Imagine how many other olypians haven't been discovered. China was so desperate to win in woman's gymnastics they found a child and forged her birth certificate. Hell, I wouldn't put it past the Chinese that this swimmer is really a male.
In Response

by: angela from: new york
August 02, 2012 1:15 AM
I cannot believe the garbage being written here, how do we justify accusing others of having past histories or doping when we ourselves have the same history, been proven we are so far ahead in doping it takes years for the testing to catch up, sometimes never caught, people wwho live in glass houses shouldnt throw stones
In Response

by: USA sore loser lying from: New York
August 01, 2012 4:38 PM
FACT is: there is no evidence, "under- age" gymnast? Where is the evidence? He "doping", where is the evidence?

FACT: whoever is making such sour grape accusations are sore losers and pathetic, racist, and ignorant - "PhD dissertation" cited as "evidence" ? Come on, we all know what South African "dissertation" is all about. And "history" is NOT evidence either. Please collect some real evidence you will be more credible rather just sounds like an ignorant idiot

by: Antonio Fernandez from: Texas
July 31, 2012 7:53 PM
Because somebody is faster faster than an american the USA are going to said she is on some kind of drugs? Really?

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
July 31, 2012 7:00 PM
Phelps actually is doping. It is impossible one human can win so many medals, just doesn't make any sense. Either he used pot to cover his PED or US government bribed the testing guy. Since US has so many bad records, we should test Phelps again with different testing officers.

by: Kenneth S from: USA
July 31, 2012 1:35 PM
Unfair? Yes, it is unfair, but it make complete sense. The US can't let a girl, a Chinese girl beat an American guy. A White guy! That can't happen! Chinese girls are geishas! How can they beat us in swimming!
In Response

by: Sarah
August 01, 2012 6:26 AM
I can not understand what your words really mean! Why unfair? Do you think what you said is fair? That is ridiculous,right?! Alougth everyone has the equality on comments, you have no reason to do this! Actually you are superior to something, you shouldn't say something that is unfair to others who win you one day!
In Response

by: Brian from: USA
August 01, 2012 4:39 AM
Kenneth S, you are a moron. Geishas are from Japan. Question everything you doubt???? test Phelps too!
In Response

by: chinese killer from: china
August 01, 2012 2:01 AM
remember one thing: nothing is impossible!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!who told you that only white guy can win?who told you chinese cannot win in swimming?your mind is tainted with biase already, but you have not realized pathetic
In Response

by: Wen from: China
July 31, 2012 9:31 PM
To win, or not to win, this is question. Win, unfair? Are you fox? Grapes...
In Response

by: adam from: usa
July 31, 2012 8:45 PM
America should keep steady in the coming years. No doubt China will beat America in every aspect.
In Response

by: Bruce Lee from: USA
July 31, 2012 8:31 PM
This is just a beginning, China will produce more and more "unbelievable," things, so get ready and get use to it !!!
In Response

by: Mike from: USA
July 31, 2012 7:17 PM
ok... you're not very smart... it would be like a girl beating Usain bolt in the sprints... yeah there definitely would be accusations of steroids/doping/etc. don't be stupid please... 7 second improvement is huge for an olympic swimmer in on year... she went from being around 1500th in the world to 1st by about 3 seconds... lol big time difference there bud
In Response

by: cowboy from: u.k
July 31, 2012 7:07 PM
are the yankees the best human on earth,incl you?
In Response

by: Ian Z from: USA
July 31, 2012 2:49 PM
Get some education before getting killed not knowing what hit you... idiot.
Comments page of 2

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