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    China Sends Second Boat to Standoff with Philippines

    Photo taken by Japanese Coast Guard shows Chinese fisheries patrol ship "Yuzheng 310" sailing near the disputed islands (2010 File)
    Photo taken by Japanese Coast Guard shows Chinese fisheries patrol ship "Yuzheng 310" sailing near the disputed islands (2010 File)

    The nine-day-old naval standoff between China and the Philippines showed few signs of cooling on Thursday, with Beijing sending a powerful military vessel toward the disputed islands in the South China Sea.

    According to Chinese media reports Thursday, officials say the country's most advanced fishing patrol vessel, the Yuzheng 310, has been sent to protect Chinese fishermen in the region.

    The standoff began early last week when Chinese surveillance ships prevented a Philippines warship from arresting several Chinese fishermen near Scarborough Shoal, an area both sides claim as sovereign territory.

    Manila has requested to refer the issue to an international court, arguing the shoal is well within its internationally recognized exclusive economic zone.

    Wednesday, Beijing rejected that request and summoned the Philippines Charge d'Affaires, Alex Chua, over the issue.

    Foreign Ministry spokesperson Liu Weimin said the islands, known as Huangyan in China, are an integral part of Chinese territory and that any Philippine claim to them is "completely baseless."

    "The Philippines has never questioned or opposed China's exercise of its sovereignty over and exploitation of Huangyan Island before 1997, and had expressed publicly several times that Huangyan Island was outside the Philippine territory," Liu said.

    But the Philippines government disputed that assertion on Wednesday, saying it has effectively exercised jurisdiction over the shoal - which it calls Panatag - for decades.

    After returning to port on Hainan Island, several of the Chinese fishermen described their experience to Chinese Central Television on Wednesday . But the official Xinhua news agency says 10 boats are still fishing in the general area of the standoff, about 230 kilometers off the northwestern Philippines.

    A Philippines Coast Guard ship and a Chinese surveillance ship also remain in the area.

    The Philippines, China, Vietnam, Taiwan, Malaysia and Brunei all have competing claims in the South China Sea. China claims nearly the entire sea based on a historical map. The Philippines says the shoal is part of its territory based on the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea, which designates a country’s exclusive economic zone as 370 kilometers from its coastline.

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    by: Dragonslayer
    April 23, 2012 6:01 AM
    http://benjaminfulford.net/ This guy is telling the truth about this conflict.

    by: MNL
    April 23, 2012 4:30 AM
    All your talk on ancient Chinese maps is a complete disregard of the current EEZ and Territorial laws defined by the UN. in 1982 to which China has been a member since 1971. Why change their minds now. If China wants to claim it for themselves, why not take it up to the U.N. and speak their ancient minds off. And stop killing the sharks just for their fins.

    by: Steve
    April 22, 2012 11:30 PM
    My philipine brothers, no one can get benfits from the blood conflicts. I hope both sides can calm down to think about how to use the resources cooprativelya and peacefully instead of using force. History is a mirror and force is the final option to solve dispute.

    by: Lin
    April 22, 2012 5:57 PM
    In my opinion, China was bullied by Philippines. Why Philippines sent two military naval ships but China just sent a fishing patrol boat? Why China should swallow an insult because it is a bigger country, it should allow Philippines (a weak and small, but aggressive country) invade and occupy its islands?

    by: Down to China
    April 22, 2012 12:52 PM
    Please, the world should rename the ASIAN SEA, instead of South china sea. They are invading the Asian state sea shores. They are claiming what they don't have there. "The Red Robber Star is rising @ Asian sea"

    by: Kobayashi
    April 22, 2012 6:24 AM
    Hey my Chinese friends! I don't think you are in a very strong position to fight anyone:
    Your cities are polluted.
    Taiwanese companies take advantage of your cheap and unskilled labor to build the iPad.
    You have pathetically copied all of your military hardware from the Russians.
    Your military are full of corrupt officers and demoralized soldiers. Who will surrender so fast at the first sign of a fight (remember fighting the Japanese?)

    by: Alex
    April 21, 2012 8:28 PM
    I don't think US gov will hep Philippines. There is no actual benefit for us. The Philippines even drown out our Navy from the naval port. Without the help of US Navy, Philippines is too weak to compete with China. So, to Philippines, it is insane to fight with China Navy for this island.

    by: Dead to China
    April 21, 2012 6:44 PM
    China has 5 trillion dollars today and wants to control the world. If they have 30 trillions, 100% the world, and the human life will be collappsed.

    by: Jonathan Huang
    April 21, 2012 5:41 AM
    This island belongs to China, we have evidence and Filipinos dont. EEZ doesnt apply to sovereignty islands. Chinese have been fishing there for thousands years and we have ancient maps and new maps to prove it. Even the new map is 60+ years old. so forget your decades claim. Filioin didnt even exist when China owned these islands!

    by: maGGot
    April 20, 2012 2:31 PM
    Kill the head and the rest will follow.
    China is big Greedy Phoney..
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