News / Asia

China Sends Surveillance Ships Near Disputed Islands

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe answers a question by an opposition lawmaker at the Upper House at the National Diet in Tokyo, April 23, 2013.Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe answers a question by an opposition lawmaker at the Upper House at the National Diet in Tokyo, April 23, 2013.
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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe answers a question by an opposition lawmaker at the Upper House at the National Diet in Tokyo, April 23, 2013.
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe answers a question by an opposition lawmaker at the Upper House at the National Diet in Tokyo, April 23, 2013.
VOA News
Japan summoned the Chinese ambassador to Tokyo after Beijing sent a group of ships near a disputed island chain in the East China Sea.

The Japanese Coast Guard said eight Chinese maritime surveillance ships entered the disputed territory near the uninhabited islands early Tuesday.

It said this is the largest incursion by Chinese ships since tensions increased in September, when Japan purchased some of the islands from their private owners.

Since then, Beijing has regularly sent patrol boats and sometimes aircraft, in an attempt to challenge Japanese control of the strategic islands.

The situation Tuesday was complicated by the presence of a flotilla of Japanese activists who, with the escort of Japanese government ships, said they were to survey the islands.

China's State Oceanic Administration said three of its ships were on "regular patrol duty" in the area Tuesday, when they encountered several of the Japanese ships. It said five more Chinese ships were sent to the region in order to respond.

No clashes were reported. Reuters said the Japanese Coast Guard told the activists to leave the area once the Chinese ships came nearby. Tokyo summoned the Chinese ambassador to Japan following the incident.

Meanwhile, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Tuesday insisted the island chain remains under the "active control" of Tokyo. In a speech to lawmakers, he vowed to "expel by force" any Chinese landing on the islands.

Handout photograph taken on a marine surveillance plane B-3837 shows the disputed islets, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, December 13, 2012.Handout photograph taken on a marine surveillance plane B-3837 shows the disputed islets, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, December 13, 2012.
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Handout photograph taken on a marine surveillance plane B-3837 shows the disputed islets, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, December 13, 2012.
Handout photograph taken on a marine surveillance plane B-3837 shows the disputed islets, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, December 13, 2012.
"We have made sure that if there is an instance where there is an intrusion into our territory or it seems that there could be landing on the islands, then we will deal with it strongly," said Abe.

The islands, known as Senkaku in Japan and as Diaoyu in China, are surrounded by rich fishing grounds and thought to be located near untapped energy reserves. They are also claimed by Taiwan.

In recent months, Beijing and Tokyo also have sent airplanes to patrol the islands, raising concerns of an accidental clash between the two Asian powers.

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Comments
     
by: remie from: canada
April 25, 2013 4:06 PM
@jonathan huang, old lamb are bunch of bias chinese ,who are blind because of their background. Logic is too difficult for them but hyprocrite is in their vocabulary.
China is the greatest threat to world and need a spanking .
In Response

by: oldlamb from: China
April 26, 2013 4:19 AM
Remie:you shoud know,few months ago, after Abe finished his second inauguration, his first planned diplomatic visit was to meet U.S President Obama. Surprisingly, Obama postponed their meeting by excusing it busy. In fact, experts explained this unusal attitude indicates US Government was totally worried about the rising trend of Militarianism. After that, Abe sent his special ambassador to South Korea (S.K)while the President Park Geun-hye spent half hour for the meeting. But two days later, she spent two hours to meet China’s special ambassador and sent back her special ambassador to China which was her first official diplomatic arrangement. Expectedly the honest ambassador was fervently and welcomed. In fact, Chinese President Xi Jinping spent more than two hours to meet the ambassador as soon as he arrived.

On January 23, 2013, Abe sent his special ambassador to China, differently treated, he had been wandered in Beijing for 3 days and finally got only one hour interview with Xijinping in the morning of January 25. Also,you may know the US’troops have been garrisoning in S.K. and Japan for 68 years since the World War 2. The US’goverment decided to transfer the commanding right of combat in S.k.to S.K’s goverment in 2015.but never do same thing for Japanese. Why can’t Japan obtain the trust from Northeast Asia and the U.S.?

by: Samurai from: Japan
April 23, 2013 8:39 PM
@Jonathan Huang . You still have so poor knowledge about Japan. Go to Japan and see how peacefully, joyfully, and courteously Japanese people are living. Or, you have ever been in Japan? Then, you are envying Japanese people, remembering Chinese people who are still suffering from one-party dictatorship, no freedom of speech, vital air pollution, poultry flu, leaders' corruption, and many other evil things. We worship the departed people and people who died in fighting for our country, not to mention. Who are war criminals of Japan? Victorious nations selfishly named several late Japanese leaders war criminals. Mao Zedong is a genuine war criminal who massacred enormously many Chinese people under the name of long march and killed a great number of people of neighboring countries and even Chinese dissidents. What China is doing now in our inherent territory is just like deeds of gangsters, who should be eliminated from our sacred territories.
In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
April 25, 2013 10:36 AM
I agree with you. In Japan we have been enjoying the fruits of democarcy and capitalism contrary to China. We can express our own opinions freely without the fears of espionage from communist party lead by limited leaders who are reported as fulfilled with corruption.

If Chinese people do not want to be the same as North Korean nations, they should be aware of the situation where they are brainwashed by the autocracy government. I agree Mao Zedong killed a lot of Chinese intelligentsia during the Caltural Revolution.

Chinese people should see the fact that not a few Taiwanese say at the present, even though they were under the Japanese rule for several decades, they like more Japanese than the Chinese in main land because the militant lead by Chiang Kai-shek fled from main land to Taiwan after defeated by Mao did more bruitous actions than the Japanese to the Taiwanese.

If you Chinese government wants to deprive territories from not only Japan but from Vietnam, Philippine, Taiwan etc, you should ask for international rules. You China is no less than a selfish nation, you are palying an important role both politically and economically in an international framework. You should refrain from omitting the interests of neighboring countries.
In Response

by: oldlamb from: China
April 25, 2013 3:07 AM
Japan stolen the island befor,now what China is cruising is normal in China's inherent territory,Japan is just like stealers those who don't want return what they stolen to the owner.You may not know what the different is between executive power and ownership. China has the ownership of Diaoyu island.peruse the history and the US'paper,please.
In Response

by: oldlamb from: China
April 25, 2013 12:11 AM
You may not know what the different is between just cause and unjustice cause in WWll.Japanese are polite appearance,but with a insidious soul.


by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
April 23, 2013 7:09 PM
Japan needs a lesson of how to behave.
Keeping worshipping those war criminals of WWII, Japan is a dangerous nation and needs to be contained.
Go China Go!
In Response

by: Lion from: USA
April 23, 2013 8:22 PM
You are an extemist. Fascist Bejing is no better than the Jap in WWII. The chinese invaded Vietnam in 1979 killing people, wiped out couple towns near the border and far away islets. They are still comminting those crimes at the present day. Chinese still believe the strong lives and the weak dies. Animal!

by: Javed from: India
April 23, 2013 9:55 AM
Eclipse raises Sino-Japan tension. http://bit.ly/15EzqRo

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