News / Asia

    China Slams NYT Report Questioning Beijing's Role in Malaysia Jet Search

    A screenshot of the article by the New York Times on China's 'false leads' in the search for the missing Malaysia Airliners, flight MH370, Tuesday, April 15, 2015 (Diaa Bekheet/VOA).
    A screenshot of the article by the New York Times on China's 'false leads' in the search for the missing Malaysia Airliners, flight MH370, Tuesday, April 15, 2015 (Diaa Bekheet/VOA).
    VOA News
    China has slammed a New York Times report suggesting Beijing's incompetence and desire to demonstrate its technological prowess has hindered the search for the missing Malaysian airliner.

    The Chinese government has poured a massive amount of resources, including ships, planes and satellites, into helping find the jet, which was carrying 154 Chinese among its 227 passengers.

    On at least two occasions, Chinese investigators claimed to have made potentially breakthrough discoveries that were dismissed days later by international investigators.

    The Times on Tuesday reported other countries involved in the search are "exasperated" at the Chinese efforts. Speaking anonymously, one senior U.S. defense official said false leads are slowing down the investigation.

    When asked about the article, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said Beijing was "very dissatisfied." She added that China's only purpose is to do everything it can to find the plane.

    “I know the world is still watching closely the search efforts for MH370.  Now we have entered a critical stage for the search," said Hua. "I don’t know what the purpose is of the New York Times to publish this story at such a critical time. It is irresponsible."

    The Times article specifically focused on China's claim that its Haixun 01 patrol ship detected underwater signals believed to have come from the missing plane's flight data recorder.

    A British ship, the HMS Echo, was diverted temporarily to help verify the claim, even though the Chinese vessel was operating well outside the search area then designated by international authorities.

    The Times quoted unnamed officials who said the false lead may have cost searchers the opportunity to record more signals from the black box, which is now believed to have run out of batteries.

    It also noted that very early on in the investigation Chinese authorities released satellite images purporting to show wreckage of the Boeing 777. It later was determined to be unrelated ocean debris.

    Many analysts say the search has become an important opportunity for China to show off its rising military strength to its Asian neighbors.

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    by: peaceliker from: east
    April 15, 2014 9:37 PM
    The New York Times article is very unprofessional, the writer feels like a a scorned wife!I am very disappointed to New York Times .

    by: J Carrington from: London, Britain
    April 15, 2014 8:19 PM
    The Americans have come out with nothing, absolutely nothing except boasts, arrogance and downright despicable behavior in the face of human tragedy in spite of their eagerness to help Malaysia pending a coming visit by Obama to instigate the South East Asian countries against China. It is not just China or Malaysia who are eager to find the plane. So the Americans shouldn't hide the fact that they had themselves rushed to the aid of the Malaysians to instigate them against the Chinese. The NYT journalists focused on lies and twisted logic to support its claims. Yet, what have the Americans achieved? And indeed, what are they trying to prove? That the US has a weak military? Well, well said, say it for yourself!

    China, on the other hand, has gotten more accurate information compared to all the other countries. The US has failed in many ways, in Afghanistan, Irag, etc. and now in Ukraine and in the past in Vietnam, etc. It is despicable that the journalists and New York Times should take this human tragedy on the jet, which included Americans and other nationalities, to cash in on a false report. China is the world superpower. The NYT reporters twisted the facts and deliberately missed out on the chronology of events. The Chinese had scaled back its operations on the search, having learnt that the aircraft was lost. It is not a time to show off their military might with the most sophisticated equipment (as the US and its clown journalists would suggest) because it is not necessary.

    Fat hope: You think China does not have the military capabilities? Don't be fooled. This is called False Negatives! Forget it, there is no such thing as great America or American exceptionalism or American military power. Just look at Ukraine and Crimea. Not only can they not help Ukraine militarily after stirring up trouble there and splitting the country but they are also unable to give financial or economic aid! Nevertheless, before you continue to make so much noise, clear your 17 trillion $ debt first. Just how toxic and how weak and nasty and evil the US is, and yes, how fat and obese they are, you can see from this kind of article. Oh, BTW, don't try and instigate the Malaysians against the Chinese. You wanted to shoot down Edward Snowden but don't continue to shoot down this downed plane. This is just a sad and unfortunate human tragedy, don't forget, but the relationship between Malaysia and China are as good as ever, and the Chinese ambassador to Malaysia just praised the Malaysian government for their excellent effort in handling this unfortunate situation!

    by: alan svile from: USA
    April 15, 2014 10:53 AM
    China think's that they the have the most sophisticated device to locate ,trace the pings that they have heard in the ocean when their moon rover can't even get a charge from their solar panel.

    by: Joyang from: Malaysia
    April 15, 2014 10:10 AM
    The New York Times is obviously trying very hard to downplay China's role in carrying out the Search and Recovery Operation. The satellite photo of debris in the South China Sea was in response to Malaysia's claim that the plane disappeared off the radar midway between West Malaysia and Vietnam despite the fact that the plane made a westward turn towards the Indian Ocean. The satellite photo of debris in the South Indian Ocean was in response to Inmarsat's information that the plane made a southward turn towards there west of Australia.

    Not only did China's satellite showed debris not related to the plane, but also French, Australian and Thai satellites showed hundreds of debris which also could not be found. After all, what would you expect to get in the Indian Ocean Garbage Patch but garbage? It is suspicious that the United States, with its many spy satellites capable of reading a car number plate, has not come out with a single satellite image of the search area. Is the US trying to gauge China's spy in the sky capability by waiting for its satellite photos?

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