News / Science & Technology

China Lands Lunar Rover

The Long March 3B rocket carrying the Chang'e-3 lunar probe is prepared for launch at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Xichang in southwest China's Sichuan province on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013.The Long March 3B rocket carrying the Chang'e-3 lunar probe is prepared for launch at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Xichang in southwest China's Sichuan province on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013.
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The Long March 3B rocket carrying the Chang'e-3 lunar probe is prepared for launch at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Xichang in southwest China's Sichuan province on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013.
The Long March 3B rocket carrying the Chang'e-3 lunar probe is prepared for launch at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Xichang in southwest China's Sichuan province on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013.
Reuters
China landed an unmanned spacecraft on the moon on Saturday, state media reported, in the first such "soft-landing" since 1976, joining the United States and the former Soviet Union in managing to accomplish such a feat.
 
The Chang'e 3, a probe named after a lunar goddess in traditional Chinese mythology, is carrying the solar-powered Yutu, or Jade Rabbit buggy, which will dig and conduct geological surveys.
 
China has been increasingly ambitious in developing its space programs, for military, commercial and scientific purposes.
 
It has moved in lock step with its emergence as a major global economic and political power.
 
"The dream for lunar exploration once again lights up the China Dream," Xinhua news agency said in a commentary.
 
In its most recent manned space mission in June, three astronauts spent 15 days in orbit and docked with an experimental space laboratory, part of Beijing's quest to build a working space station by 2020.
 
The official Xinhua news service reported that the spacecraft had touched down in the Sinus Iridum, or the Bay of Rainbows, after hovering over the surface for several minutes seeking an appropriate place to land.
 
A soft landing does not damage the craft and the equipment it carries. In 2007, China put another lunar probe in orbit around the moon, which then executed a controlled crash on to its surface.
 
China Central Television broadcast images of the probe's location on Saturday and a computer generated image of the probe on the surface of the moon on its website.
 
The probe and the rover are expected to photograph each other tomorrow.
 
The Bay of Rainbows was selected because it has yet to be studied, has ample sunlight and is convenient for remote communications with Earth, Xinhua said.
 
The rover will be remotely controlled by Chinese control centers with support from a network of tracking and transmission stations around the world operated by the European Space Agency.
 
For more than a decade, China has been modernizing its economy and developing in areas long dominated by the West, particularly the United States. The moon landing will be seen as a demonstration of China's ability to engage in sophisticated space operations with dual use potential.
 
China is also developing its own satellite system to rival the U.S. GPS system and has sold satellites to other countries.
 
The landing will also be a point of national pride in the country, which is undergoing difficult economic transitions.

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Comments
     
by: MikeBarnett from: USA
December 15, 2013 3:18 PM
The lunar landing, space station, and Baidu (GPS) system show China's plans to develop space peacefully. Seeking resources on the moon, Mars, and, most importantly, the asteroid belt allow humans to grow economies without wars over minerals. Planets, including moons, need extensive mining, but asteroids have resources on or near the surfaces. Earth has 64 billion cubic miles, but only 20 miles of crust exists before reaching the molten center. The asteroid belt has all 64 billion cubic miles or 67 times earth's resources for gathering or using rocket engines to bring asteroids to near earth orbit for exploitation. How many wars can we avoid if we increase our resource base 6700%?
In Response

by: MikeBarnett from: USA
December 17, 2013 8:26 PM
I am not a liberal; I am a pragmatist. I work with those with whom I must work. China exists and is advancing in science, engineering, and technology. I have no desire to start a thermonuclear world war over the disputes of other countries. China's claim to Tibet dates to the 1240's, many centuries before the USA, and I see no reason for the USA to fight for one side or the other. Britain drew the boundaries between China and British India and took territory from China. France did the same in 1885 for French Indochina. I see no reason to fight wars to uphold the rights of colonial empires.

In 2002, China signed the Conduct of Parties agreement with ASEAN and agreed to resolve territorial disputes peacefully. In 2011, China signed bilateral agreements with all claimants to the South China Sea to resolve territorial disputes peacefully. I have fought wars, and China is fighting no wars at this time. The best advice is to negotiate. There are two sides in any negotiation, and your side may not gain all that it thinks it wanted, but as long as your side remains alive, you may discover more evidence or better arguments or better compromises.
In Response

by: MikeBarnett from: USA
December 17, 2013 8:00 PM
To Yoshi

One possibility is to set up joint stock companies in which nations can invest to obtain shares of any resources obtained from space. This would resolve the issue of each nation's share of minerals from space for economic development on Earth, the Moon, Mars, or any other celestial body. Nations could invest in space stations in the same manner to take advantage of scientific processes that can occur more rapidly or more completely in weightless environments.

Unfortunately, the US did not allow Chinese astronauts to work in space in the US space program. The US does not allow Chinese astronauts to travel to the current International Space Station. Therefore, China has started work on its own space program that has begun work on a space station and has sent a lander to the Moon. However, China has invited other nations to send their nationals to participate in China's space program. China has not yet had many manned space missions that would allow astronauts from other countries at this time, but that should change as more manned missions are conducted.
In Response

by: Hoang from: Canada
December 17, 2013 5:52 AM
To MikeBarnett,
It is even sadder that you are an American and sympathetic toward China. It is Liberals like you that aid in China's rise with giving technology to China and cause the decline of the U.S. Is it peace rise when China claims entire South China Sea(means south of China, not belong to China) up to other countries shores; constantly harrassing defenceless Vietnamese fishermen fishing in Vietnam's territorial waters; claim islands from Japan; invaded islands from Vietnam and territories from Phillipines, invaded Tibet; annexed territories from Vietnam and eastern Europe former Soviet Union. China also claims Mongolia, part of Laos. China send thousands of Chinese workers to Vietnam and Africa to take natural resources with negotiation with corrupt governments.
In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
December 16, 2013 9:44 PM
To MikeBarnett, thank you for your information suggesting the hopeful resources in the moon and asteroids. I understand China is making its great efforts to exploit their resouces even to outerspace. But I have some questions regarding Chinese purposes in outerspace exploitation. I wonder if it is really for peaceful use. China is of cause using satellites for military search. Why does not or can not China join the international space station?
In Response

by: MikeBarnett from: USA
December 16, 2013 1:12 PM
@Hoang. I have a DD214 that proves that you are a liar. I served in the US Army Special Forces in Vietnam, and I don't know why you are telling lies about me. If you dislike this article, write comments about this article.
In Response

by: Hoang from: Canada
December 16, 2013 5:25 AM
Mike Barnett is Chinese national in disguise spreading China's propaganda peaceful rise to the West.

by: Samurai from: Japan
December 15, 2013 3:19 AM
I'm afraid that too much money has been invested (or wasted) in this lunar landing project. What PRC government must do now is not to waste money but to give food to poor nationals, to resolve the air pollution problem that has been bothering not only Chinese people but also all the neighboring countries, to stop the corruption by leaders of PRC, to save nationals from cancer villages, and so on. The money wasted this time in this project would have saved enormously many nationals. PRC is going to get resources on the Moon all to itself. The resources are reserved for all humans in the world.
In Response

by: Tian from: China
December 16, 2013 5:30 AM
What a absurd comment! If we human beings always pay our attentions to those endless questions such as poverty and hunger, our science and technologies would not develop, and our offspring would still be under poverty and hunger. We should have a long-term vision, not just the current question.
In Response

by: Yang Gao from: China
December 16, 2013 2:51 AM
Speak Rubbish!

by: abbas from: shangrila
December 15, 2013 12:24 AM
Anyone can see china is getting stronger and richer, but by no means dangerous.

by: zhou xueyuan
December 14, 2013 8:22 PM
The reports on China are always full of ideology of cold war.

by: Yoshi from: Sappoo
December 14, 2013 7:57 PM
It has been shown that China has advanced scientific technology and enough money to send a spacecraft on the moon by this success. It is reported that space exploraton of China has been lead by its military authorities and they are planning to exloit mines underground. I would like to ask how China intends to deal resources when they are happenned to be got. I am afraid China claims those resources and applys them for militay use. Interntional laws ruling interest in the moon resources should be given.

by: Taklimakan from: China
December 14, 2013 6:52 PM
That's a great success……

by: Manda Ginjiro from: Minami, Namba, Osaka
December 14, 2013 6:00 PM
That might be a fake because nobody can see what is going on the moon. Don't believe what they made.
In Response

by: Hoang from: Canada
December 16, 2013 5:28 AM
The Japanese are way more advanced and humane than Chinese. World War 2 is the past. Get over it.
Chinese steal technology from West for their own selfish greed.
In Response

by: adam256
December 14, 2013 6:39 PM
japanese true attitute to what chinene achieved! hahaha~

by: Xaaji Dhagax from: Somalia
December 14, 2013 5:30 PM
European,America and now Asian made historic landing on Moon. Is it possible for any African countries could fly to the moon in the near future?
I know one thing that, right here in Somalia, we do not have the dream of scientific space explorations instead we fall in love the discussions of the continuation of high level strategic political corruptions and clan/tribal warfare.
In Response

by: Gao from: China
December 16, 2013 2:55 AM
Where there is a will there is a way!
In Response

by: Site from: China
December 15, 2013 6:35 AM
I've learned something about ur country through a chinese TV documentary named "On the road". Best wish to u and ur country. someday u r gonna get rid of all the bad things

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