News / Europe

    China May Be Biggest Winner From Ukraine Crisis

    Talks in July between Russia's President Vladimir Putin, second from left, with his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, right, in Fortaleza, Brazil, came as the two countries find an increasing number of areas of policy overlap.
    Talks in July between Russia's President Vladimir Putin, second from left, with his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, right, in Fortaleza, Brazil, came as the two countries find an increasing number of areas of policy overlap.
    Mike Eckel

    Thousands of miles away from the Ukrainian battlefields of Donetsk and Novoazovsk sits the country that may end up being the largest beneficiary of the turmoil along Russia’s southwest border: China.

    With Russian President Vladimir Putin rewriting the playbook on security in post-Cold War Europe, Beijing has watched warily 3,700 miles to the east, though without protest or interference.

    Its abstention from a U.N. Security Council resolution vote in March that condemned Russia’s annexation of Crimea was unusual, given Beijing’s traditional stance on such votes, but it comes as bilateral ties have been on the upswing for years now.

    Two generations ago, ties between Leonid Brezhnev’s Soviet Union and Mao Zedong’s China were fraught. The two fought small-scale skirmishes in 1969 along the Ussuri River border (the Wusuli in Chinese) that almost resulted in war.   

    That’s a distant memory now.  

    “China may win out” from the Ukraine crisis? asked Martha Brill Olcott, a longtime scholar of Russia and Central Asian politics. “I think the word is ‘will.’ China ‘will’ absolutely benefit.”

    Strategic goals

    Where neighboring countries are concerned, the only nation with a military currently capable of taking on Russia’s full scale is China.

    Russia has plenty to be wary of: tens of millions of Chinese live across the border from a Russian region that is virtually devoid of people and home to an astounding wealth of natural resources.

    Most of the population is packed into the tiny sliver of land on the Pacific coast known as Primorye, a sliver that blocks China from having access to the Sea of Japan.

    Goodwill with Beijing is important, and by keeping China unthreatened, Moscow helps secure its “strategic rear,” said Andrew Kuchins, director of the Russia and Eurasia program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

    “It’s important for them, and I think particularly for Russia, to create mutual vulnerabilities which helps to secure those rears so that China will not move in the direction of Russia in a military way,” Kuchins said at a recent roundtable discussion in Washington.

    Where China benefits from the Ukraine crisis most is because of the distraction, said Robert Daly, who heads the Wilson Center’s Kissinger Institute on China and the United States.

    Russia’s actions divert attention from China’s own simmering internal conflicts.

    Equally, Beijing benefits because Washington is focused on the security needs of its European allies, rather than the four-year-old “pivot to Asia” that some in China viewed as threatening.

    “The single biggest benefit is that for China, events in Ukraine, Iraq, Syria; these are the latest major events that distract the United States from carrying out the rebalance to the East,” Kuchins said.

    Geographic aims

    In former Soviet Central Asia – home to countries like Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan – Russia and China, and to a lesser degree the United States, Turkey and Europe, have been engaged in a slow-motion chessboard shuffle, trying to build new relationships or bolster old ones.

    The Kremlin’s influence over its former republics isn’t what it used to be, but Moscow has sought to build on longstanding cultural, linguistic, economic and social ties to make sure it can still pull levers when it has to.

    China joined a Russia-led security group comprised mainly of Central Asian nations known as the Shanghai Cooperation Organization.

    Set up in 2001, the SCO was ostensibly aimed at monitoring regional terrorist threats, though many analysts viewed it also as a way for the two rivals to keep a close eye on one another.

    It’s also a way to minimize influence of the United States, which fostered close military ties with Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan after the Sept. 11 attacks but whose influence has since diminished.

    The Ukraine crisis was a wake-up call for Central Asian leaders, experts say, particularly for those countries with sizable Russian populations like Kazakhstan.

    “Internally, in Central Asia, at high levels, there’s really been the sense that there’s a crisis time coming in Russia, and the question was when,” said Olcott, who has ties to many of the region’s elites. 

    “It’s going to make it easier for the Chinese to get what they want. It certainly will change how the SCO is going to operate, leaving Russia potentially even more isolated both in the SCO and Central Asia more broadly," she said.

    “The Central Asians are clearly afraid of Russia, but it’s not clear the Russians have the ability. ... The question for the Central Asians will be: Does Russia have the capacity to do this at the same time?” Olcott added. 

    Economic needs

    The Kremlin has looked to the East for years as a hedge against the possibility that European markets might suddenly be less welcoming to Russian products.

    Above all, this is about oil and gas. Russia is currently the dominant source for Europe’s energy needs. But disputes with Ukraine that predate the current crisis have led to calls in European capitals to diversify away from Russian sources.

    So Russia has turned east. Gas from the Pacific island of Sakhalin is flowing via the Primorye region, and a spur cutting south from the Eastern Siberia Pacific Ocean pipeline brings more than 300,000 barrels a day south into the industrial city of Daqing.

    The $400 billion, 30-year deal signed in May to bring gas from Siberian fields into China’s northern industrial regions is the biggest example to date of Russia’s turn to eastern markets. Most industry watchers, however, think Beijing got the better deal.

    “With Putin, he was very much on the back foot here, big time. He wanted to say to the Europeans, we don’t have to sell it to you. He wanted to say to the Europeans that you can stick your gas where the sun don’t shine,” said Malcolm Graham-Wood, with the British energy consultancy HydroCarbon Capital.

    "But “it’s massively Chinese weighted. Putin is selling Russian gas on the cheap, at a big discount… The clear winner is China. They’re taking the long view on this,” he said.

    Oil and gas may be primary, but there are other trade opportunities lurking.

    The Kremlin’s imposition of retaliatory sanctions last month barred many consumer products from European and North American countries.

    Chinese entrepreneurs are already gearing up to fill the holes in Russian supermarkets shelves, said one executive at a company called Shandong Goodfarmer, the largest Chinese exporter of apples, garlic and ginger.

    “With an entire year of the ban, the Russian produce market is bound to experience a shortage of supply in the coming year, which is a huge opportunity for the Chinese produce industry,” Lu Zuoqi told the trade publication, freshfruitportal.com, on Aug. 12.

    Military means

    China’s military doesn’t want for manpower. With an estimated 2.2 million personnel, the People’s Liberation Army is the world’s largest.

    Where its shortcomings are is in sophisticated technologies that would make another military superpower think twice about intervening in places that Beijing considers its core strategic interest.

    Russia’s military spending is on the upswing: up 92 percent in nominal terms since 2010, according to IHS Jane’s Defence Weekly. Russia’s weapons makers – think Sukhoi, MiG, Zvezda, Almaz-Antey – are happy to benefit from this largesse, but the Defense Ministry isn’t their only client.

    State-run arms dealer Rosoboronexport has been expanding its customer base for years, trying to gain market share from the world’s largest arms dealer, the United States.

    Moscow has sold diesel attack submarines to Vietnam and Sukoi fighter jets and Mil helicopters to India in past years.

    The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute estimates that since 2009, half of all Russian arms sales went to India and China.

    China is also opening the budget spigots for military spending.

    Its 2014 military budget was set at 12.2 percent over previous years. Stepping up purchases is a priority, but so is developing indigenous systems, particularly for theater-specific weapons known as “access-denial.”

    The idea is to build an arsenal that can keep unwanted intruders (think the United States) out of places China doesn’t want it to be (think the Taiwan Strait). Russian-built S-300 anti-aircraft defense systems or Kh-35 anti-ship missiles fit that bill nicely

    Submarines as well as aircraft carriers fit that bill, too. China’s first is a Soviet ship inherited by Ukraine after 1991 and then overhauled and sold to Beijing.

    The idea is “to raise the cost of US/NATO intervention virtually anywhere,” Kuchins, of CSIS, said. “That’s useful for the Chinese, that’s useful for the Syrians, that’s useful for a number of other clients. This puts an emphasis on anti-air, and anti-ship technologies, key for Russian arms sales.”

    Domestic agenda

    China has been less than happy about Putin’s decision to foment insurgency in another country. That’s because China has plenty of internal unrest of its own to handle: the Tibetans, the Uighurs, for example, analysts say.

    The Ukraine crisis may end up changing that calculus as Russia, seeking to build goodwill with Beijing, moves to openly back China in its own territorial disputes. East China Sea, anyone? 

    “The Russians may move from their studied neutral opposition vis-a-vis Chinese territorial disputes in the East in order that the Chinese might support the Russians so that they have more running room in the areas that the Russians are more concerned about,” Kuchins said.

    At the Security Council vote, when Western powers pushed a resolution condemning Russia for annexing Crimea, Beijing abstained rather than vetoed the measure alongside Moscow. Some experts interpreted that as a rebuke to Russia.

    Others, however, said the abstention, along with Beijing’s unwillingness to join in Western sanctions against Russia, is a better indicator of the emerging policy between the two giants.

    “Such a stance by China should be interpreted as nothing other than benevolent neutrality toward the Kremlin,” said Artyom Lukin, deputy director of the School of Regional and International Studies at Russia’s Far Eastern Federal University, in an article published in March.

    “One may suspect that, in exchange, Beijing would expect from Moscow the same kind of ‘benevolent neutrality,’ for example, regarding its actions in East Asia and the Western Pacific,” he said.

    You May Like

    In Britain, The Sun Still Doesn’t Shine

    Invoking Spitfires and Merlin, Leave voters insist country can be great again, following surprising 'Brexit' vote last week

    Double Wave of Suicide Bombings Puts Lebanon, Refugees on Edge

    Following suicide bombings in Christian town of Al-Qaa, on Lebanon's northeast border with Syria, fears of further bombings have risen

    US Senators Warned on Zika After Failing to Pass Funding

    Zika threats and challenges, as well as issues of contraception and vaccines, spelled out as lawmakers point fingers

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 2
        Next 
    by: Hoang from: Canada
    September 04, 2014 1:19 PM
    William from Canada, Ukraine is not strategically as important to America as South China Sea and Vietnam. Only greedy Viet Cong bow down to China, not Vietnamese people.

    by: viet nguoi boston from: boston
    September 03, 2014 9:16 AM
    china is the biggest threat to the world now and years to come !

    by: william li from: canada
    September 02, 2014 10:58 AM
    america is the biggest threat to China. China will fully support Russia until America is collapsed. Unless America moves out of west Pacific Ocean, stops messing up South China sea. China must support Russia to hold america back in Ukraine so China can focus on her core strategic interests in Diaoyu island and south china sea.

    by: Max from: Ukraine
    September 02, 2014 8:01 AM
    Russia is weakening now with all sanctions and by turning all the world against itself. This is definitely beneficial to China, as they have old territorial issue.
    By 2017 Russian economics and its politics will be so much ruined that China WILL enter the arena and say its word. China is too smart to show their needs now, but the strategy is obvious.

    by: Doke Wene from: USA
    September 01, 2014 8:14 PM
    @Terry Major:
    China will never be an invader towards any country in the world, but whoever invades China will pay a big price. USA, Japan, Phillipines and Vietnam therefore, should not make any stupid moves.

    by: Rodger from: Wisconsin
    September 01, 2014 7:45 PM
    So why doesn't China take some of Russia's land now with Putin in Ukraine?? This would be the time for them to make their move.

    by: Blur from: BA
    September 01, 2014 7:34 PM
    Most of you commentators are pretty paranoid. Instead of trying to scare Russia into surrender to Western domination plans, ever think of not messing with Russia at all? You wouldn't have this situation if you still didn't still have Cold War paranoia to this day. But instead you want to go the long way around into distracting from the Western colonialist need to bark orders to everyone in the world into trying to make it about China.

    I also love how some of you point to China's history. Like your history of trying to take over the world, genocide, and enslavement doesn't count? The problem is you're actually more stupid than the people you're trying to manipulate with your propaganda. I love how you [expletive deleted] Russia and because Putin is showing resistance and you're in panic you bring up China that has nothing to do with this. If you're scared China will come out on top, that's because you were stupid enough to go down this road in the first place. I bet all you arm-chair quarterbacks forget that you also predicted China was going to invade Taiwan when the US was preoccupied with Iraq and Afghanistan. So when is that invasion you said was going to happen?

    by: dale from: santa cruz mts, californi
    September 01, 2014 5:52 PM
    "Two generations ago, ties between Leonid Brezhnev’s Russia and Mao Zedong’s China were fraught. "

    For the last time, in 1969, Brezhnev did not lead Russia but the USSR. The distinction is not a matter of nit-picking. Russia is a far different society than the old Soviet Union. For instance, Ukraine was an integral part and a command economy was in place.

    This conflation of the USSR and Russia is often used to give support (however flawed) to the idea that Russia is an empire, like the USSR, with expansionist desires.
    This claim is as absurd as claiming that North America consists of the United States.


    by: moomooslice from: boston
    September 01, 2014 5:14 PM
    China has contributed nothing to the world other than sitting by the sideline taking opportunies to make profits wherever possible. China reserves the right to cheat, to lie and intimidate others to achieve its goals shamelessly !

    by: Grundoon107 from: USA
    September 01, 2014 4:40 PM
    Alexander the Great, it doesn't work that way these days. The rules have been changed.
    Comments page of 2
        Next 

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Slow Rebuilding Amid Boko Haram Destruction in Nigeria’s Northeasti
    X
    June 29, 2016 6:15 PM
    Military operations have chased Boko Haram out of towns and cities in Nigeria’s northeast since early last year. But it is only recently that people have begun returning to their homes in Adamawa state, near the border with Cameroon, to try to rebuild their lives. For VOA, Chris Stein traveled to the area and has this report.
    Video

    Video Slow Rebuilding Amid Boko Haram Destruction in Nigeria’s Northeast

    Military operations have chased Boko Haram out of towns and cities in Nigeria’s northeast since early last year. But it is only recently that people have begun returning to their homes in Adamawa state, near the border with Cameroon, to try to rebuild their lives. For VOA, Chris Stein traveled to the area and has this report.
    Video

    Video Clinton Leads Trump, But Many Voters Don't Like Either

    In the U.S. presidential race, most recent polls show Democrat Hillary Clinton with a steady lead over Republican Donald Trump as both presumptive party nominees prepare for their party conventions next month. Trump’s disapproval ratings have risen in some recent surveys, but Clinton also suffers from high negative ratings, suggesting both candidates have a lot of work to do to improve their images before the November election. VOA National correspondent Jim Malone has more from Washington.
    Video

    Video New US Ambassador to Somalia Faces Heavy Challenges

    The new U.S. envoy to Somalia, who was sworn into office Monday, will be the first American ambassador to that nation in 25 years. He will take up his post as Somalia faces a number of crucial issues, including insecurity, an upcoming election, and the potential closure of the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya. VOA’s Jill Craig asked Somalis living in Kenya’s capital city Nairobi how they feel about the U.S. finally installing a new ambassador.
    Video

    Video At National Zoo, Captivating Animal Sculptures Illustrate Tragedy of Ocean Pollution

    The National Zoo in Washington, D.C., is home to about 1,800 animals, representing 300 species. But throughout the summer, visitors can also see other kinds of creatures there. They are larger-than-life animal sculptures that speak volumes about a global issue — the massive plastic pollution in our oceans. VOA's June Soh takes us to the zoo's special exhibit, called Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea.
    Video

    Video Baghdad Bikers Defy War with a Roar

    Baghdad is a city of contradictions. War is a constant. Explosions and kidnappings are part of daily life. But the Iraqi capital remains a thriving city, even if a little beat up. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on how some in Baghdad are defying the stereotype of a nation at war by pursuing a lifestyle known for its iconic symbols of rebellion: motorbikes, leather jackets and roaring engines.
    Video

    Video Melting Pot of Immigrants Working to Restore US Capitol Dome

    The American Iron Works company is one of the firms working to renovate the iconic U.S. Capitol Dome. The company employs immigrants of many different cultural and national backgrounds. VOA’s Arman Tarjimanyan has more.
    Video

    Video Testing Bamboo as Building Material

    For thousands of years various species of bamboo - one of the world's most versatile plants - have been used for diverse purposes ranging from food and medicine to textiles and construction. But its use on a large scale is hampered because it's not manufactured to specific standards but grown in the ground. A University of Pittsburgh professor is on track to changing that. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Orphanage in Iraqi City Houses Kids Who Lost their Parents to Attacks by IS

    An orphanage in Iraqi Kurdistan has become home to scores of Yazidi children who lost their parents after Islamic State militants took over Sinjar in Iraq’s Nineveh Province in 2014. Iraqi Kurdish forces backed by the U.S. airstrikes have since recaptured Sinjar but the need for the care provided by the orphanage continues. VOA’s Kawa Omar filed this report narrated by Rob Raffaele.
    Video

    Video Re-Opening Old Wounds in a Bullet-Riddled Cultural Landmark

    A cultural landmark before Lebanon’s civil war transformed it into a nest of snipers, Beirut’s ‘Yellow House’ is once again set to play a crucial role in the city.  Built in a neo-Ottoman style in the 1920s, in September it is set to be re-opened as a ‘memory museum’ - its bullet-riddled walls and bunkered positions overlooking the city’s notorious ‘Green Line’ maintained for posterity. John Owens reports from Beirut.
    Video

    Video Brexit Resounds in US Presidential Contest

    Britain’s decision to leave the European Union is resounding in America’s presidential race. As VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump sees Britain’s move as an affirmation of his campaign’s core messages, while Democrat Hillary Clinton sees the episode as further evidence that Trump is unfit to be president.
    Video

    Video NASA Juno Spacecraft, Nearing Jupiter, to Shed Light on Gas Giant

    After a five-year journey, the spacecraft Juno is nearing its destination, the giant planet Jupiter, where it will enter orbit and start sending data back July 4th. As Mike O'Sullivan reports from Pasadena, California, the craft will pierce the veil of Jupiter's dense cloud cover to reveal its mysteries.
    Video

    Video Orlando Shooting Changes Debate on Gun Control

    It’s been nearly two weeks since the largest mass shooting ever in the United States. Despite public calls for tighter gun control laws, Congress is at an impasse. Democratic lawmakers resorted to a 1960s civil rights tactic to portray their frustration. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti explains how the Orlando, Florida shooting is changing the debate.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora