News / Asia

In China, US Official Defends US Pivot to Asia

U.S. Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey, left, speaks alongside Chinese counterpart Gen. Fang Fenghui, Bayi Building, Beijing, April 22, 2013.U.S. Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey, left, speaks alongside Chinese counterpart Gen. Fang Fenghui, Bayi Building, Beijing, April 22, 2013.
x
U.S. Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey, left, speaks alongside Chinese counterpart Gen. Fang Fenghui, Bayi Building, Beijing, April 22, 2013.
U.S. Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey, left, speaks alongside Chinese counterpart Gen. Fang Fenghui, Bayi Building, Beijing, April 22, 2013.
Reuters
— The United States' top military officer on Monday defended the re-orientation of U.S. foreign policy towards Asia in front of his Chinese counterpart, a week after Beijing criticized Washington for ramping up its military presence in the region.
 
China is uneasy with what the United States has called the "rebalancing" of forces as Washington winds down the war in Afghanistan and renews its attention further east.
 
China says the policy has emboldened Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam in longstanding territorial disputes with Beijing.
 
U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey said the United States "has been and will continue to be a Pacific power."
 
"We seek to be a stabilizing influence in the region," Dempsey said at a news conference at China's Ministry of National Defense. "In fact, we believe it would be our absence that would be destabilizing in the region, not our presence."
 
Dempsey was speaking at a joint press conference with Chinese Chief of the General Staff of the Chinese People's Liberation Army Fang Fenghui after both sides held talks earlier in the day.
 
China's defense ministry made a thinly veiled criticism of the United States last week for increasing tensions in the Asia-Pacific, saying China faces "multiple and complicated security threats" due to the U.S. strategy.
 
Fang said there is a possibility that North Korea could launch a fourth nuclear test.
 
"We ask all sides to work on the North Koreans to stop the nuclear tests, and stop producing nuclear weapons," he said.
 
Fang reiterated China's stance that it is firmly opposed to nuclear tests by North Korea.
 
China is North Korea's main diplomatic and financial backer, but in recent months it has begun to express impatience with Pyongyang.
 
After weeks of threats of war by North Korea, Pyongyang said last week it would return to negotiations subject to a list of conditions, including the lifting of U.N. sanctions. The United States said it was seeking "clear signals" that the North would halt its nuclear weapons activities.
 
North Korea has moved two short-range missile launchers to its east coast, apparently indicating it is pushing ahead with preparations for a test launch, a South Korean news agency reported on Sunday.
 
When asked whether China was willing to delegate staff to set rules for global cybersecurity, Fang said that the Internet, "if it is not managed well, it may bring damaging consequences."
 
"If security cannot be guaranteed, it is not an exaggeration to say that the damage of consequences could be as serious as a nuclear bomb," he said.
 
Beijing and Washington have traded accusations in recent months of massive cyber intrusions. The United States says hacking attacks emanating from China have targeted U.S. government and corporate computer networks among others, stealing government and commercial data.
 
A U.S. computer security firm released a report in February saying a secretive Chinese military unit is believed to be behind a wave of hacking attacks against the United States.

You May Like

Diplomats Work to Extend Arab-Israeli Cease-Fire

Top officials from the US, France, Britain, Germany, Italy, Turkey and Qatar gather in Paris, while Israel security forces continue searching for tunnels used by militants and Gazan rescue workers search for bodies More

Photogallery US Defense Department Warns of Arms to Eastern Ukraine

‘Imminent’ delivery of Russian rocket launcher poses threat to civilians, US says More

Video Researchers: Africa Genetically Modified Crops Held Back by Scaremongering

GM crops offer best hope of increasing productivity and coping with climate change in Africa, according to co-author of Chatham House report More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Anthony Alfidi from: San Francisco, CA
May 07, 2013 4:45 PM
The US is correct to defend its pivot in front of a Chinese audience. The pivot is a defensive move to reassure Asian democracies. China can come to RIMPAC if it doesn't threaten its neighbors: http://thirdeyeosint.blogspot.com/2013/04/naval-war-college-foundation-seminar-in.html

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Astronauts Train in Underwater Labi
X
George Putic
July 25, 2014 7:25 PM
In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Not Even Monks Spared From Thailand’s Junta-Backed Morality Push

With Thailand’s military government firmly in control after May’s bloodless coup, authorities are carrying out plans they say are aimed at restoring discipline, morality and patriotism to all Thais. The measures include a crackdown on illegal gambling, education reforms to promote students’ moral development, and a new 24-hour phone hotline for citizens to report misbehaving monks. Steve Sandford reports from Bangkok.
Video

Video Virtual Program Teaches Farming Skills

In a fast-changing world beset by unpredictable climate conditions, farmers cannot afford to ignore new technology. Researchers in Australia are developing an online virtual world program to share information about climate change and more sustainable farming techniques for sugar cane growers. As VOA's Zlatica Hoke reports, the idea is to create a wider support network for farmers.
Video

Video Airline Expert: Missile will Show Signature on Debris

The debris field from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is spread over a 21-kilometer radius in eastern Ukraine. It is expected to take investigators months to sort through the airplane pieces to learn about the missile that brought down the jetliner and who fired it. VOAs Carolyn Presutti explains how this work will be done.
Video

Video Treatment for Childhood Epilepsy Heats up Medical Marijuana Debate

In the United States, marijuana is classed as an illegal drug by the federal government. But nearly half the states have legalized it, to some degree. Proponents say some strains of marijuana might have exceptional health benefits, for treating pain or inflammation in chronic conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Shelley Schlender reports on a strain of medical marijuana developed in Colorado that is reputed to reduce seizures in childhood epilepsy
Video

Video Airbus Adds Metal 3D Printed Parts to New Jets

By the end of this year, European aircraft manufacturing consortium Airbus plans to deliver the first of its new, extra-wide-body passenger jets, the A350-XWB. Among other technological innovations, the new plane will also incorporate metal parts made in a 3-D printer. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video AIDS Conference Welcomes Exciting Developments in HIV Treatment, Prevention

Significant strides have been made in recent years toward the treatment and prevention of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. This year, at the International AIDS Conference, the AIDS community welcomed progress on a new pill that may prevent transmission of the deadly virus. VOA’s Anita Powell reports from Melbourne, Australia.
Video

Video IAEA: Iran Turns its Enriched Uranium Into Less Harmful Form

Iran has converted its stockpiles of enriched uranium into a less dangerous form that is more difficult to use for nuclear weapons, according to the United Nations’ Atomic Energy Agency. The move complies with an interim deal reached with Western powers on Iran's nuclear program last year, in exchange for easing of sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

AppleAndroid