News / Asia

Chinese Graduates Face Tight Job Market

A man adjusts a student's mortar board during the graduation ceremony at Fudan University in Shanghai June 28, 2006. (File)
A man adjusts a student's mortar board during the graduation ceremony at Fudan University in Shanghai June 28, 2006. (File)
William Ide
China will see a record number of graduates moving into the job market this summer. Seven million will complete their studies this year and shift their attention toward building a career. With China’s economy already slowing, job prospects for many new graduates are not good.
 
At a hotel near some of Beijing's most prestigious schools, scores of job seekers are lined up, waiting to speak with recruiters about opportunities at software, information technology and engineering firms.
 
One of them is An Tingting, a 22-year-old recent graduate from central Henan province. She came to Beijing a couple months ago to take an IT training course.
 
“I have been looking for jobs the past two weeks and I think that it is indeed hard because I graduated from a vocational school, and so the level of my education is pretty low. Also, I did not study software in college, I studied education, so it is more difficult for me to find an IT job,” she said.

Not only are there seven million graduates this year moving into the market, but more than 200,000 who graduated last year are still looking for jobs.
 
“Only 30 percent of graduates can sign a contract and be employed right away," explained Hu Xingdou, an economist at the Beijing Institute of Technology. "The majority of students have to continue to look for work or remain unemployed."
 
And it’s not just the number of graduates that is making the search for jobs difficult.
 
After a decade of double-digit growth, China’s economy is slowing. Chinese leaders admit they are struggling to keep growth around seven percent.
 
But, Hu Xingdou said the biggest problem is the unsustainable structure of China’s industry and the huge disparities between regions.
 
“There are many places in China where graduate students are needed, but graduate students are not willing to go. For example private enterprises in China have a strong need for graduate students, but students prefer to go to state owned enterprises, government departments, public institutions, foreign companies and so forth,” Hu said.

Back at the job fair, Xie Zhiyong said that while he already has a job, he is looking for another because he does not like his current work environment.  He said that if you have some experience, it is easy to find jobs.
 
Xie studied bio-technology and graduated two years ago from a school in southeastern Jiangxi province.
 
“In Beijing there are more companies, more talent is here and there are more opportunities… I want to develop myself here for a bit and then I hope to go back to Jiangxi to develop more," Xie said.
 
Recently, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang called on companies to give more opportunities to new graduates. In response, some privately run enterprises have announced increases in their hiring of new graduates.
 
Analysts say the government could go even further by giving private companies tax incentives and funding to help level the playing field with state-owned enterprises. They also say the government could encourage new graduates to work in smaller cities away from China’s coastal areas by giving them subsidies or other incentives.

You May Like

Video VOA Reporter Tours Devastated Peshawar School

Islamist militants wearing military uniforms and strapped with explosives attacked a military run school Tuesday in the northwestern Pakistani city of Peshawar. At least 141 people were killed in the horrific attack, most of them young students. More

Video Sudan School Becomes Target of Aerial Attacks

Dropout rate at an all-time high in South Kordofan state because many schools have been destroyed during 3-year civil war More

Tennessee Songbirds Fly Coop Long Before Tornadoes Arrive

Researchers say birds apparently alerted to danger by sounds at frequencies below range of human hearing More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: John Matthews from: London
June 07, 2013 4:54 AM
I work for a graduate recruitment website in the UK (We Connect Students). There is a similar job shortage for UK students who don't look in the right place - In some cases there are 100s of applicants going for one job. We have a system that connects employers with only students that match their job criteria.


by: Ulchi from: US
June 01, 2013 1:45 PM
American graduates don't have better chance than those in China anyways. 7.5% unemployed rate is not good at all for the young, newly graduated.


by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
June 01, 2013 10:50 AM
Dictatorship China: literacy : total94.2% ,male96.7% femal91.5%
26% of China's university-age population is enrolled in an institution of higher education.
Democratic India: literacy: total73% male80.9% femal64.6%
and 18% university enrollment in India.
Well, now you can judge by yourself.


by: Sun from: Taipei
May 31, 2013 2:38 AM
As long as CPR (Communist China) exists, Chinese graduates will never become happy. Chinese economy will be destructed by the enormous inflation of military expenses and corruption committed by CPR leaders and their relatives. China must be freed from the one-party rule. Otherwise no bright prospect can be seen by Chinese graduates, although they are very capable.

In Response

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
June 01, 2013 10:37 AM
tell me Sun from Taipei then how come Democratic India has worse corruption than China and its economy is also much worse than China's? Tell me if democratic Mexico or Brazil is better than China!
your comments is funny trying to connect dictatorship with economy or corruption.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US: Response to Sony Hack Will Be Proportionali
X
Aru Pande
December 19, 2014 1:45 AM
The White House says President Barack Obama considers the cyberattack on Sony Corp. a serious national security matter and that the U.S. will counter with an "appropriate response." VOA correspondent Aru Pande reports.
Video

Video US: Response to Sony Hack Will Be Proportional

The White House says President Barack Obama considers the cyberattack on Sony Corp. a serious national security matter and that the U.S. will counter with an "appropriate response." VOA correspondent Aru Pande reports.
Video

Video Sudan School Becomes Target of Aerial Attacks

The school dropout rate is at an all-time high in Sudan's South Kordofan state because many schools have been destroyed during the three-year civil war between the government and SPLA-N rebel forces. Adam Bailes visited Sudan's Nuba Mountains' region and reports many children are simply too scared to go to school
Video

Video Nigerians Fleeing Boko Haram Languish in Camp Near Capital

In its five-year effort to impose Islamic law in northeastern Nigeria, the Boko Haram extremist group has killed thousands of people and forced hundreds of thousands to flee. Some of those who ran for their lives now live in squalor on the edges of the capital, Abuja. Chris Stein reports for VOA.
Video

Video Putin Says Russian Economy Will Emerge Stronger

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said his country's sinking economy will not only recover but also become stronger, despite falling oil prices and Western sanctions over Ukraine. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports.
Video

Video Detained Turkish Journalists Follow Teachings of US-Based Preacher

The Turkish government’s jailing of critical journalists has sparked international condemnation and is being seen as an effort to undermine the followers of an ailing Turkish preacher based in the United States. VOA religion reporter Jerome Socolovsky has more.
Video

Video ‘Anti-Islamization’ Marches Increase Tensions In Germany

Anti-immigrant rallies in Germany have been building in recent weeks, peaking Monday night in the city of Dresden where tens of thousands of people turned out to demonstrate against what they call the ‘Islamization’ of the West. Germany has offered asylum to more Syrian refugees than any other country, and this appears to have set off the protests. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Aceh Rebuilt Decade After Tsunami, But Scars Remain

On December 26, 2004 there was an earthquake in the Indian Ocean so powerful it caused the Earth’s axis to wobble a few centimeters. Onshore on the island of Sumatra, the resulting tsunami was devastating. A decade later, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Banda Aceh, Indonesia, where although there is little remaining evidence of the physical devastation, the psychological scars among survivors remain.
Video

Video Refugees Living in Kenya Long for Peace in the Home Countries

Kenya is host to numerous refugees seeking safe haven from conflict. Immigrants from Somalia face challenges in their new lives in Kenya. Ahead of International Migrants Day (December 18) Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.

All About America

AppleAndroid