News / Asia

Chinese Ministry Expresses Concern about 'Cancer Villages'

A view of red polluted water in the Jianhe River in Luoyang, Henan province, China, December 13, 2011. A view of red polluted water in the Jianhe River in Luoyang, Henan province, China, December 13, 2011.
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A view of red polluted water in the Jianhe River in Luoyang, Henan province, China, December 13, 2011.
A view of red polluted water in the Jianhe River in Luoyang, Henan province, China, December 13, 2011.
VOA News
Chinese environmental officials are now raising the same concern that has worried environmental activists for years: that severe pollution has led to a rise of so-called "cancer villages."

Activists and some journalists have been using the term "cancer villages" for several years to describe villages located close to waterways or industrial parks where cancer rates are very high.

A report issued this week by China's Environment Ministry, specifically mentions "cancer villages," blaming the problem on severe water and air pollution.  It is thought to be one of the first times the term has been used by government officials. Official statistics indicate China has about 1,700 water pollution accidents each year and that up to 40 percent of the country’s rivers are seriously polluted.

Water researcher Zhao Feihong at the Beijing Healthcare Association said last month that of the more than 100 rivers in Beijing only two or three can be used for tap water.
"The rest of the rivers if they have not dried up, then they are polluted by discharge,” she said.

During the last week of January, smog hung over cities and towns from Liaoning in the north to as far south as Guangdong and air pollution reached unhealthy levels for long periods of time.

Chinese officials blamed industrial activity, construction and the widespread use of coal for heat.

Some information for this report was provided by AFP.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: PRC from: China
February 25, 2013 7:33 AM
We know here have many problems ,and we will do our best to change them! Thank U for concerning!


by: Don from: US
February 24, 2013 8:45 PM
People think the US eradicated black slavery 100 years ago, this assumption is false! We are all slaves globally! Slaves of our governments, banks, and corporations! Most people don't realize this!


by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
February 24, 2013 11:43 AM
This is one of the many advantages, that makes China, one of the global factories, whose producers have an enourmously tilted playing in their favour; they have lax, at best, nonexistent a worst toxic polution/dischage controls; similar situation for workers protection standards; similar for the use of toxic inputs, that jeopardize worker and end customer health. Food products are also poorly controlled, thus from time to time we read about mass exposures of the unfortunate people in China.
This is the bad globalization economic model, that takes away good US and Western nation's jobs; because our politicians are at best sleeping at the switch, at worst, do not care. By allowing such bad practices to go on, we are indirectly responsible for the terrible health toll, this bad globalization model, will take on the average people living in China. We have a direct obligation on our unemployed workers to level the bad globalization playing field, and a moral obligation to humanity, in China, to push for proper controls to save the people of China from bad gvmt policies. These bad policies will needlessly kill their people and irreversibly destroy their biosphere, and probably our also.


by: Choe from: Seoul
February 24, 2013 3:59 AM
Chinese air pollution has been hurting the health of many Korean people. It is almost threat from China, which is bigger than Chinese nuke. Chinese never thinks about other nations or even other Chinese people. What a trouble-making country China is!

In Response

by: Anonymous
February 25, 2013 1:38 AM
You've got a good imagination!


by: Purfus from: Purftown
February 23, 2013 10:18 AM
Revolt!!!


by: Kitagawa Keikoh from: Free Hills, Tokyo
February 23, 2013 5:31 AM
I'm just wondering why Chinese government and Chinese people does not take any actions soon against pollution.
As mentioned in the comment, they are concerning only themselves and their money.
China will corrupt soon.

In Response

by: Luo from: China
February 23, 2013 6:56 PM
OK,as a Chinese,I just believe our governments have ability to handle with problems such as pollution.We all know that what happened at Fukushima is a good lesson.We can overcome obstacles,always and forever.

In Response

by: fromchina from: PRC
February 23, 2013 9:35 AM
Eh.Feel sorry for this bad situation.We have hurted this land and the ppl too much.


by: Frank from: O.County
February 22, 2013 10:54 PM
It is well known that PRC leaders and high-class officials are letting their relatives (wives and children) live in USA in order to protect them from air pollution and water contamination. In addition, they are sending enormously much money to American bank accounts to hide their money obtained through corruptions. Oh! Poor Chinese people! They are kept uninformed about those matters. Environmental analysts say that about 60-million Chinese people will be affected by the air pollution. The "cancer villages" are just the tips of the iceberg.

In Response

by: Anonymous
February 24, 2013 4:07 AM
we know our circumstance clearly and know what PRC leaders has done to the chinese people. But we can do nothing to revlot. We wish we can speak out loudly to the government and push it to conduct innovations both in society and politics. But the government just care whether their regime is stable. what they have done and is going to do is to keep their regime under control.

In Response

by: fromchina from: PRC
February 23, 2013 1:21 AM
Thanks for caring about this Land.A report issued on Feb. 7th by China's Environment.many populace know the situation u mentioned above,but what can we do about it?i don't know.there are many problems here.but we populace will try our best. hope us good luck.
:(

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