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Chinese Sculptors Bring Their Talent to US Holiday Ice Show

Chinese Sculptors Bring Their Talent to US Holiday Ice Showi
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December 04, 2013
No matter what the thermometer shows about the weather in your neighborhood - this next story will keep you cool. For the Christmas holiday, a huge attraction at the Marriott Gaylord National hotel near Washington DC is made entirely of ICE. Actually, more than 900,000 kilograms of ice! As VOA’s Carolyn Presutti shows us, the artwork is done entirely by Chinese ice carvers.
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No matter what the thermometer shows about the weather in your neighborhood - this next story will keep you cool.  For the Christmas holiday, a huge attraction at the Marriott Gaylord National hotel near Washington, DC is made entirely of ice.  Actually, more than 900,000 kilograms of ice!  

Walk inside a massive white tent and the noise hits you first, followed by the brisk air.

You're hearing the sounds of forklifts and chainsaws, slicing through ice.  

The temperature is minus 12 degrees Celsius....the air turns a smoky color when someone exhales. But it must be this cold to preserve the 6,000 massive blocks of ice. Carvers are chipping the blocks into life-sized characters from a children's Christmas storybook.

The carvers only speak Mandarin, like Xu Rui who is the art director of the exhibit.

“We learn it since we were really young," said Xu Rui.

For Xu Rui, that was age 9.  He, like all the others, lives in Harbin, China, known as the Ice Capital of the World because of its annual ice festival that draws 800,000 visitors. This is Xu Rui's 11th exhibit in the U.S. and, he says, the best - as he gestures to the ceiling of the tent.  The tallest sculpture - depicting New York City's Empire State Building - is nearly seven meters-tall.  

Xu Rui looks at blueprints and yells out orders to move one of the ice blocks and to carve it into a circle.  The ice architects build the exhibit without understanding its theme - "Twas The Night Before Christmas," is an American classic, read aloud on the Christian holiday.   

“Now the story is uh…sorry… I can’t recall," he said.

Same with Zhang Haijun who is chiseling windows in the skyscrapers of a Christmas scene in Manhattan.

"I’ve never been to New York, I carve from the pictures people show me. But when I’m finished with this project, I really want to go to New York to see it for real," said Zhang Haijun.

Zhang Haijun wears oversized rubber gloves - he holds a chisel with a long handle - some of the ice equipment he brought from Harbin.

“We can’t get these tools from the store. They are customized and I’ve been using them for years," he said.

The low temperature inside the tent must stay steady because if it's too cold, the ice is too brittle.  Too warm and it won't chip properly.  

The carvers spend 12 hours a day in this frigid workplace  - in a month, they are finished:

The bare brown blocks have become eight lifesized reindeer suspended above the crowd, pulling Santa's sleigh.

Plain slabs have transformed into an exquisite clear ice nativity, the religious centerpiece of Christmas.  Visitors stare and are tempted to touch the sculptures, to confirm they are made of ice.

The yellow ice blocks that were carried in on forklifts are now a lifesized New York City taxi.  Visitors climb into the real leather seats for a perfect photo.

The slanted plank is now a two-story ice sliding board.  Nearby is a floor-to-ceiling green ice Christmas tree with gold garland and vibrant yellow, pink, and purple colored ice presents stacked underneath.

The display, simply called “ICE!” is a Christmas gift for Washington, D.C., wrapped in 900,000 kilograms of ice,  from 34 expert carvers from China.

  • New York skyscrapers made of ice at National Harbor in Maryland. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)
  • A man stands in front of a New York taxi made of ice at National Harbor in Maryland. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)
  • A sign made of colored ice at National Harbor in Maryland. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)
  • A man works on ice displays at National Harbor in Maryland. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)
  • Santa, his sleigh and reindeer made of ice at National Harbor in Maryland. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)
  • Brightly colored presents made of ice at National Harbor in Maryland. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)
  • A nativity scene made of ice at National Harbor in Maryland. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)
  • A holiday themed ice Statue of Liberty at National Harbor in Maryland. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)

Carolyn Presutti

Carolyn Presutti is an award-winning television reporter who works out of VOA’s Washington headquarters.  She has won an Emmy, many Associated Press awards, and a Clarion for her coverage of Haiti,  national politics, the southern economy, and the 9/11 bombing anniversary.  In 2013, Carolyn aired exclusive stories on the Syrian medical crisis and the Asiana plane crash, and was VOA’s chief reporter from the Boston Marathon bombing.

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