News / Europe

US Hopes to Win Czech Nuclear Plant Bid

Czech Republic's Foreign Minister Karel Schwarzenberg, left, and US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, arrive for their press conference in Prague, Czech Republic, Dec. 3, 2012.
Czech Republic's Foreign Minister Karel Schwarzenberg, left, and US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, arrive for their press conference in Prague, Czech Republic, Dec. 3, 2012.
VOA News
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says she is "not shy" about pushing for an American firm to win a nuclear plant construction contract in the Czech Republic.

U.S. firm Westinghouse and a Russian company are bidding on a $10 billion contract to expand the Temelin nuclear plant.  The Czech Republic wants to boost its nuclear capacity to produce about half of the country's electricity, up from about 30 percent today.

Clinton met Monday with Czech Prime Minister Petr Necas and Foreign Minister Karel Schwarzenberg, encouraging the country to diversify its energy sources.  The country depends on Russia for the majority of its energy supply.

Clinton said Westinghouse is the best option in terms of technology and safety, and that the project would create jobs both for Czechs and Americans.

A decision is expected next year.

Austria has raised concerns about its neighbor's nuclear push, with the Temelin plant located about 50 kilometers from the Czech-Austrian border.

Clinton began a five-day European trip Monday, which includes talks later in the day in Brussels with Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar and military chief Ashfaq Kayani.

She will also take part in meetings Tuesday and Wednesday with NATO foreign ministers in Brussels.

Clinton will close her trip with stops in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

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by: Paxus Calta from: Amsterdam
December 05, 2012 5:54 AM
While VOA is better than stories, because it does not report the false claim of 9000 US jobs created, and there are still problems with this story.

This project will not create 9,000 US jobs, this is just one of the many lies that Westinghouse is telling about this project in an effort to save their nuclear division from bankruptcy because of a global decline in nuclear orders post Fukushima. See why at http://funologist.org/2012/12/04/too-big-a-lie-to-fail/


by: Mrs. Ann from: US
December 03, 2012 8:23 AM

Where are the good Democrats like John F. Kennedy who would have been against nuclear energy, because nuclear energy = nuclear weapons.

And look what nuclear energy did to Japan, which is a country devastated by nuclear plant meltdowns of March 2011.

Children in Japan are testing with radiation in their thyroid glands and food in Japan is high in radiation.

Nuclear energy is a form of insanity.

The MSM has a black-out on this information, but thankfully alternative sights have picked up the slack.

Highly recommend:

www dot enenews dot com

www dot enformable dot com

www dot nuclearhotseat dot com (excellent interviews)


by: Jack Kessler
December 03, 2012 8:19 AM
This is one of the most regrettable aspects of our current policies: pushing nuclear energy -- selling it -- we should be pushing its safeguards, and elimination, pushing alternatives to it instead, and energy conservation. The Czechs have no Fukushima tsunamis, but some disaster will happen there, and the US will be responsible. Chernobyl was US-designed.

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