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Clinton Africa Trip Seen as Move to Counter Chinese Influence

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, July 25, 2012.Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, July 25, 2012.
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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, July 25, 2012.
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, July 25, 2012.
Peter Clottey
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is scheduled to meet Senegal President Macky Sall Wednesday at the state of her six-nation Africa visit.

American University professor Emilio Viano said one of the objectives of Clinton’s visit is to compete with the growing influence of China in Africa.

“One of the major objectives of the visit is to compete with China and try to limit China’s influence, business making and political power in Africa,” said Viano.

Viano said it appears the Obama administration wants to change what he called the country’s neglect of Africa.  He said Washington seems to have concerns about  China’s growing influence in the continent.

“China is looking for guaranteed sources of resources… and, therefore, it has a major presence in many African countries. This is of concern to the US, first of all, because of competitive reasons,” Viano explained.

“The U.S. wants to use this [visit] as a maneuver to limit the influence of China.  This will not be done openly; it will be done, of course, diplomatically without naming names, but certainly cautioning African leaders not to strike deals too easily with China," said Viano.       
                                
He said China’s policy of not asking questions surrounding human rights and governance and labor laws give it an advantage in its relations with African countries.

Viano said Clinton will likely congratulate Sall on Senegal’s democracy. Senegal inaugurated a new parliament Monday with a coalition led by Sall’s party, which holds a large majority.  Many observers described both the presidential and parliamentary elections as free and fair.

“The secretary wants to applaud Senegal’s democracy because there were some problems with these elections that were eventually solved democratically, and this is very important as an example in Africa,” said Viano. “There is also a preoccupation concerning the part of the US to show support for Senegal that has a border with Mali [where Islamists control the country’s north] in any eventuality that this conflict might spill over.”

Some observers say the Islamists controlling northern Mali are linked to the al-Qaida terror network.

Viano said Sall is likely to ask for America’s help to resolve the security crisis in Mali’s north.

“I’m sure that is going to be part of the conversation where Senegal wants to make sure that there are assurances from Washington that, should al- Qaida and its allies try to move into Senegal, particularly to acquire access to the sea, that the US would stand by and provide assistance just as it did [in Uganda] by sending 100 special forces to help with the Lord’s Resistance Army,” said Viano.

He said Washington now appears to want to reaffirm its interests across Africa.

“It [the Clinton trip] is trying to recoup quite a bit of neglect of Africa, along with Latin America, in the past administration of George W Bush and also, in part, during this [Obama] administration,” said Viano. “They are now trying to catch up with time with Secretary Clinton’s work in Africa…but now they want to reaffirm the presence and the interests and the support of the US and, most of all, the business aspect, and this will be most visible particularly in South Africa.

Clottey interview with Emilio Viano American University professor
Clottey interview with Emilio Viano American University professor i
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Comments
     
by: Ketta Beri from: Ethiopia
August 02, 2012 4:48 AM
China in Africa

The great difference the Chinese and the Westerners is that not only the Chinese came not really to exploit Africa but thanks to them the global Economy and Financial Crisis and the present recession and sky rocketing prices of diverse manufacture materials are eased by the wonderful and rapid deliverance of Chinese products to Africa! Otherwise, without China, was it possible for an African to afford in importing industrial goods from USA, Europe or elsewhere? Another great advantage of the Chinese, is most of their Tradition is similar to Africa, and they are here in Person! They can easily adhere to the African Culture and way of living. Working as masonry, architect, road and bridge builders, electricians, hydropower, Oil drilling, Agriculture, and many others. Africa is already forgotten by westerners, by whom they are forgotten. Africa, considered as war, drought, illness, misère zone, for many westerns to think about Africa is to feel sick. That was a terrific mistake that today the Americans thrive to catch up what once in the Bush Ära failed to do so. We also praise Americans for their continuous help around the globe in order to restore democracy and the humanitarian Help.
Ketta.


by: challa
August 01, 2012 4:30 AM
hmmmmmmmmmmm
Too late and too little.

The funny thing is the double standard way of doing things in Africa. "He said China’s policy of not asking questions surrounding human rights and governance and labor laws give it an advantage in its relations with African countries". Is America also considering Human right and governance. Where and how? As far as i know, USA dodnt consider human right issues in ethiopia. Please Clinton Leave us alone and let work with china and it will be very difficult to you to do so and specially if young leaders are coming to Africa. Your friend who killed us Meles Zenawi already gone.

In Response

by: almoros idriss
August 01, 2012 9:56 AM
Thank you and welcome the brilliant and very active Secretary Clinton! USA has had been in Africa for long and has ever been first and greatest donator at all African crises with multi billions of dollars as direct assistance to all African regions at immensely hard and harsh times whenever Africans in great need. But there have been some wrong plocies of demanding demogracy first before infrastructure with 90 percent illeterate nations, and that policy ought to be changed and ever be blessed USA!

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