News / USA

US Senate Keeps Government Funded

The US Capitol in Washington, DC
The US Capitol in Washington, DC
Cindy Saine
In a post-midnight vote, the U.S. Senate has voted to keep the U.S. government funded for the next six months. The vote was 62-30. 

Republican Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky forced a vote on his amendment to cut U.S. aid to Pakistan, Libya and Egypt, but the Senate overwhelmingtly defeated the measure it by a vote of 81-10.

The fiscally conservative senator led a one-man campaign to keep the Senate from voting on a must-pass bill to fund the federal government unless Senate Majority leader Harry Reid agreed to allow a vote on Paul's amendment to cut off foreign aid to the three countries. 

Paul said he did not expect the measure to pass, but he wanted senators to have to go back home and explain to their constituents why they voted for aid to countries where there are violent anti-American protests.

The senator said, "When you look at the polls of the American people, you find that nearly 80 percent of the American people think foreign aid in general is a bad idea.  We have roads in our country that are crumbling and need repair, we have bridges that are crumbling. In my state alone we had a bridge out six months last year.  We have two bridges that are older than I am and need to be replaced in Kentucky.  We don't have the money, but we somehow have billions of dollars to send to people who disrespect us and burn our flag."

Amendment to restrict funding

Paul's amendment would have made any resumption of aid contingent on Egypt and Libya arresting the people responsible for the recent embassy and consulate attacks and turning them over to U.S. authorities. The measure would have required Pakistan to release an imprisoned doctor who helped the CIA identify the late al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden.

Some Republicans support a push to restrict foreign aid to countries with governments not deemed to be reliable allies.  But many Republicans strongly objected to the Paul amendment as a terrible idea that would damage U.S. national security interests.

Republican Senator John McCain of Arizona said, "Nothing would be more welcomed in Libya today than if the Islamists and al-Qaida, who are there, and other extremists would - nothing would make them happier than to hear that the United States had cut off all assistance to Libya."

Most Democrats also rejected cuts to foreign aid, saying some of the countries that are undergoing political changes need U.S. assistance now more than ever.  Democratic Senator Max Baucus pleaded for Democrats and Republicans to work together on these sensitive foreign policy issues.

Baucus said, "It used to be not too many years ago that in foreign policy issues, because they are really non-partisan, we as a country worked together.  We faced the country, the world, as one voice.  So I strongly caution my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to not make this a partisan issue, that is U.S. policy in the Middle East, especially in this case northern Africa."

"Blame game"

But during a day of contentious debate, Republican and Democratic lawmakers blamed each other for leaving a number of major issues unresolved, such as tax cuts and a looming across-the-board cut in government and defense spending.  Senate Majority leader Harry Reid blamed Republicans.

"Over the past week, I have listened to my Republican colleagues come here to the floor and lament how little the Senate has accomplished during the 112th Congress.  I above all share that concern.  But in fact it is a wonder we we have gotten anything done at all considering the lack of cooperation Democrats have gotten from Republican colleagues," said Reid.

Senate Republicans blamed Reid and his Democratic members for not passing appropriations bills, making another temporary spending bill necessary to keep the federal government running.  After the vote, senators joined their colleagues in the House of Representatives in heading to their home districts for a seven-week recess to campaign for the November 6 election.

You May Like

Nigeria Incumbent in Tight Spot as Poll Nears

Muhammadu Buhari is running a strong challenge to Goodluck Jonathan, amid a faltering economy and Boko Haram security worries More

Video Liberia's Almost Last Ebola Patient Grateful but Still Grieving

Beatrice Yardolo tells VOA that despite her fame, life is still a struggle as she waits for government's promise of support to arrive More

Video Cambodian Land Grabs Threaten Traditional Communities

At least seven different indigenous groups in Ratanakiri depend mainly on forest products for their survival, say they face loss of their land, traditional way of life More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: NVO from: USA
September 24, 2012 2:15 PM
How many more are duped into ignorance by our own regime as to the REAL AGENDA of THE NEW WORLD ORDER headed by the Rockefeller and Rothschild families??The house of Rothschild owns $Trillions. They only need to administer their wealth, to see that it is nicely placed, they do not need to work, at least not by what we understand as work. But who provides them and thier like with such an enormous amount of money?

Who does this? You do it, nobody but you! That's right, it is your money, hard earned through care and sorrow, which is drawn as if magnetically into the coffers of these insatiable people.



by: NVO from: US
September 24, 2012 1:40 PM
This is how the NEW WORLD ORDER operates, yet the American public is BLISSFULLY IGNORANT to it!!: "Fathom the hypocrisy of a government that requires every citizen to prove they are insured... but not everyone must prove they are a citizen."

Now add this, "Many of those who refuse, or are unable, to prove they are citizens will receive free insurance paid for by those who are forced to buy insurance because they are citizens."


by: marco
September 22, 2012 11:36 AM
here is the list for the votes.

http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=112&session=2&vote=00196

by: Barb from: NY
September 22, 2012 9:21 AM
Names! I want names of those who voted against this bill!
In Response

by: Mark from: Philly
September 22, 2012 12:36 PM
Here is the vote result. http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=112&session=2&vote=00196
In Response

by: marco
September 22, 2012 11:33 AM
yes, we want the names of who wants to keep funding dictators around the world.

that was the main purpose of this vote... But I am sure lots of politicians are doing their best to keep this vote quiet.

do not be fooled "foreign aid" is just an euphemism for subsidizing a dictator to control oil wells and mines for big American and European corporations.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Liberia's Almost Last Ebola Patient Grateful but Still Grievingi
X
Benno Muchler
March 26, 2015 3:41 PM
Beatrice Yardolo was to make history as Liberia’s last Ebola patient. Liberians recently started counting down 42 days, the period that has to go by without a single new infection until the World Health Organization can declare a country Ebola-free. That countdown stopped on March 20 when there was another new case of Ebola, making Yardolo’s story a reminder that Ebola is far from over. Benno Muchler reports from Monrovia.
Video

Video Liberia's Almost Last Ebola Patient Grateful but Still Grieving

Beatrice Yardolo was to make history as Liberia’s last Ebola patient. Liberians recently started counting down 42 days, the period that has to go by without a single new infection until the World Health Organization can declare a country Ebola-free. That countdown stopped on March 20 when there was another new case of Ebola, making Yardolo’s story a reminder that Ebola is far from over. Benno Muchler reports from Monrovia.
Video

Video Cambodian Land Grabs Threaten Traditional Communities

Indigenous communities in Cambodia's Ratanakiri province say the government’s economic land concession policy is taking away their land and traditional way of life, making many fear that their identity will soon be lost. Local authorities, though, have denied this is the case. VOA's Say Mony went to investigate and filed this report, narrated by Colin Lovett.
Video

Video US, South Korea Conduct Joint Military Exercises

The Eighth U.S. Army Division and the Eighth Republic of Korea Mechanized Infantry Division put on a well orchestrated show of force for the media this week during their joint military training exercises in South Korea. VOA’s Seoul correspondent Brian Padden was there and reports the soldiers were well disciplined both in conducting a complex live fire exercise and in staying on message with the press.
Video

Video Space Program Status Disappoints 'Last Man on the Moon'

One of the films that drew big crowds last week at the annual South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, tells the story of the last human being to stand on the moon, U.S. astronaut Eugene Cernan. It has been 42 years since Cernan returned from the moon and he laments that no one else has gone there since. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports.
Video

Video Young Filmmakers Shine Spotlight on Giving Back

A group of student filmmakers from across the United States joined President Barack Obama at the White House this month for the second annual White House Student Film Festival. Fifteen short films were officially selected from more than 1,500 entries by students aged 6 through 18. The filmmakers and their families then joined the president and a group of celebrities for a screening of their films. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
Video

Video VOA Exclusive: Interview with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, during his first visit as president to Washington, gave a one-on-one interview with VOA Afghan Service reporter Said Suleiman Ashna, about his request for a change in U.S. troop levels, the threat from the Islamic State, and repairing relations with the United States and Pakistan. The interview was held at Blair House, late Sunday, in Pashto.
Video

Video California Science Center Tells Story of Dead Sea Scrolls

The ancient manuscripts were uncovered in the mid-20th century, and they are still yielding clues about life and religious beliefs in ancient Israel. As VOA's Mike O'Sullivan reports, an exhibit in Los Angeles shows how modern science is bringing the history of these ancient documents to life.
Video

Video Angelina Jolie Takes Another Bold Step

Hollywood actress and filmmaker Angelina Jolie has revealed she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to lower her odds of getting cancer. Doctors say the huge publicity over her decision will help raise awareness about the importance of cancer screening. VOA’s George Putic has more

All About America

Circumventing Censorship

An Internet Primer for Healthy Web Habits

As surveillance and censoring technologies advance, so, too, do new tools for your computer or mobile device that help protect your privacy and break through Internet censorship.
More