News / Asia

China Mourns Boston Bombing Victim

Boston police officer stands guard at a memorial site at Boylston and Arlington streets along the course of the Boston Marathon on April 16, 2013, a few blocks from where two explosions struck near the finish line.
Boston police officer stands guard at a memorial site at Boylston and Arlington streets along the course of the Boston Marathon on April 16, 2013, a few blocks from where two explosions struck near the finish line.
William Ide
Chinese authorities are declining to disclose the name of the Chinese student confirmed as the third victim in the Boston Marathon bombing.  But Internet users and Chinese media outlets have gone ahead and identified her as Lu Lingzi, a graduate student at Boston University who had a passion for finance, music and cooking.
 
Condolences and remembrances filled Chinese social media sites Wednesday as internet users discussed her fate and the authorities’ reluctance to identify her.
 
Lu Lingzi's Weibo post on Weibo siteLu Lingzi's Weibo post on Weibo site
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Lu Lingzi's Weibo post on Weibo site
Lu Lingzi's Weibo post on Weibo site
Her last posting on China’s Twitter-like service Weibo Monday morning, before she went to the marathon, was of bread and fruit under the title: “my wonderful breakfast!”

Nearly 20,000 Weibo account holders have already posted responses to the photo in her remembrance, including small candles and the words Rest in Peace.
 
Lu and another Chinese national, Zhou Danling, who is also a graduate student at Boston University, were near the finish line when the bombs exploded.
 
Zhou was injured in the blast, but is now in stable condition after receiving treatment on Monday and Tuesday.

Lu’s hometown is in the northeastern city of Shenyang, in China’s Liaoning province.
 
On its Weibo account, the Shenyang Evening News also confirmed that Lu was the third victim. The posting - which was later removed - said that Lu’s father confirmed his daughter’s death when reporters visited their home.
 
The Shenyang Evening News ran pictures of Lu on their cover Wednesday, with a headline that read “Shenyang girl missing, Stay Safe.”
 
China’s state-run Xinhua news agency has also run a story with a headline that confirms Lu as the third victim. However the story provided few other details.
 
Chinese censors routinely scrub mentions of sensitive or controversial events from media outlets and websites, but apparently have done little to stop the conversation about Lu Lingzi.  
 
Friends of Lu have been reaching out to her and others in Boston since Monday. Some were still in disbelief that she was the one who died, and were holding out until a name was released by authorities.
 
One user “on the road”  wrote: "as long as a name has not been released it is not her."

Other Weibo users wondered why the government was not releasing the name and speculated that Lu must be the daughter of some official or wealthy Chinese family.
 
Others dismissed the theories, saying details about her and her family are now widely available online, and there is no mystery around her identity.
 
The children of some of China’s top officials study in the United States under pseudonyms, including the daughter of President Xi Jinping and the son of fallen politician Bo Xilai.  They are among more than 194,000 Chinese students studying in American schools during the 2011-2012 academic year, according to the Institute of International Education.

Photo Gallery: Boston Marathon Explosions

  • In this image from video provided by WBZ-TV, spectators and runners run from what was described as twin explosions that shook the finish line of the Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013.
  • An emergency responder and volunteers, including Carlos Arredondo in the cowboy hat, push Jeff Bauman in a wheel chair after he was injured in an explosion near the finish line of the Boston Marathon April 15, 2013.
  • Medical workers transport the injured across the finish line during the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion, April 15, 2013.
  • Medical workers aid injured people at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion, April 15, 2013.
  • One of the blast sites on Boylston Street near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon is investigated by two people in protective suits in the wake of two blasts in Boston April 15, 2013.
  • Runner John Ounao cries when he finds friends after several explosions rocked the finish of the Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013.
  • A police officer clears Boylston Street following an explosion at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013.
  • Medical workers aid a wounded woman at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following two explosions there, April 15, 2013.
  • Medical workers aid injured people at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston, April 15, 2013.
  • A woman is comforted by a man near a triage tent set up after explosions went off at the 117th Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013.
  • A Massachusetts state police officer guards the area containing the medical tent, rear, following an explosion at the 2013 Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013.
  • An unidentified Boston Marathon runner leaves the course crying near Copley Square following an explosion, April 15, 2013.
  • A Boston police officer wheels in injured boy down Boylston Street as medical workers carry an injured runner following an explosion during the 2013 Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013.
  • Justine Franco of Montpelier, Vermont, holds up a sign near Copley Square looking for her missing friend, April, who was running in her first Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013.
  • President Barack Obama leaves the podium after speaking in the press briefing room at the White House, April 15, 2013, following the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: George Fulmore from: Concord, CA
April 22, 2013 7:42 PM
One of the underreported elements of the horror of the Boston bombing was the recognition of how the world has become so intertwined. Here we have a Chinese national student killed in a crowd at an American sporting event.
There is no way to put the genie back into the bottle. Folks for all nations come and go to and from the U.S. all the time. We should celebrate this diversity, not regress into wave the flag jingoism that encourages those who would try to gain from the tragedy, try to derail the passage of comprehensive immigration reform.


by: meng
April 17, 2013 12:26 PM
It was not the government but the poor girl's parents who didn't want to release the girl's name. Wish her rest in peace. CNN you could do better.

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