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Bribery & Corruption Worsening Worldwide, Survey Shows

Bribery & Corruption Worsening Worldwide, Survey Showsi
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July 10, 2013 12:09 AM
Corruption and bribery are perceived to be getting worse in many countries, and trust in governments is falling worldwide, according to a survey by the group Transparency International. Henry Ridgwell reports from London on the non-profit's latest corruption survey.
Henry Ridgwell
Corruption and bribery are perceived to be getting worse in many countries, and trust in governments is falling worldwide, according to a survey by the group Transparency International.

The Global Corruption Barometer 2013 paints a bleak picture. One in every four people paid a bribe in the last 12 months when accessing public institutions and services, according to Transparency International's report.

Robert Barrington is Executive Director.

“In terms of bribe paying, there are a couple of countries where three in four people say they have had to pay bribes in the past year. That’s Sierra Leone and Liberia," said Barrington.

Globally, political parties are seen to be the most corrupt institution. Map via the 2013 Transparency International report.Globally, political parties are seen to be the most corrupt institution. Map via the 2013 Transparency International report.
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Globally, political parties are seen to be the most corrupt institution. Map via the 2013 Transparency International report.
Globally, political parties are seen to be the most corrupt institution. Map via the 2013 Transparency International report.
Transparency International interviewed 114,000 people in 107 countries and found that more than half believe corruption and bribery has worsened in the last two years.

Again, Robert Barrington:

“Ultimately our target has to be policymakers because leadership from the top is critical in this. And when you look at the countries that have improved, perhaps Georgia and Rwanda compared to past surveys, it’s generally been politically-driven governments that want to do something about corruption that’s made the change," he said.

All too often a leader's drive to tackle corruption fades, says Bertrand de Speville who heads an anticorruption consulting firm that has advised more than 50 governments.

“It suddenly dawns on him that that might affect colleagues, friends, political allies, family, maybe even himself. And time and again I’ve seen the light of that political will die while you’re talking to him," said de Speville.

In India in 2011, social activist Anna Hazare gained worldwide fame after leading a hunger strike against corruption.

“I want the poor to get justice. I want the money back that we have lost to corruption," said Hazare.

Hundreds of supporters joined him in the hunger strike, and the government agreed to introduce anti-corruption legislation. But the so-called Lokpal Bill has yet to be passed.
 
De Speville says the poor suffer the most - and bribery must be tackled on every level.

“You only have to think of the fields of security or public health to realize the truth of that. One small bribe can have disastrous consequences," he said.

But, says de Speville, advice on tackling corruption by institutions such as the World Bank have had little effect.
 
“Given the amount of resources that have been devoted to the problem, in my view, it is little short of scandalous. I don’t believe it is that difficult. And indeed, places like Hong Kong and Singapore have demonstrated that it’s not that difficult," he said.

Transparency International says those surveyed appeared eager to take on corruption themselves - with more than half of respondents saying they would be willing to report an incident of bribery.

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by: nikefreerun from: us
July 12, 2013 1:37 PM
History has proved that every now and then periodically there are revolutions in order for human civilization to advance. It's happening now in Middle East and soon will be in Asia and Western Hemisphere. Once the New World Order is established on little blue marble, the next Space War will be more interesting to see (not in our life time) to be witnessed by your children. America is already in the lead of Space War - Curiosity is secretly collecting data on Mars. America has successfully destroyed an alien planet - Deep Space Impact, let alone little humans on planet Earth. World War 3 is just the next childplay. Hope that American Empire has learned the history from the fall of Romans.


by: Vickie from: usa
July 10, 2013 9:07 AM
The corruption in the White House is destroying this country with welfare hispanics.

In Response

by: Itani Milleni
July 10, 2013 10:33 AM
History has proved that every now and then periodically there are revolutions in order for human civilization to advance. It's happening now in Middle East and soon will be in Asia and Western Hemisphere. Once the New World Order is established on little blue marble, the next Space War will be more interesting to see (not in our life time) to be witnessed by your children. America is already in the lead of Space War - Curiosity is secretly collecting data on Mars. America has successfully destroyed an alien planet - Deep Space Impact, let alone little humans on planet Earth. World War 3 is just the next childplay. Hope that American Empire has learned the history from the fall of Romans.

Thomas Jefferson said:
"... God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion. The people cannot be all, and always, well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented, in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive.
If they remain quiet under such misconceptions, it is lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty.... And what country can preserve its liberties, if its rulers are not warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms.
The remedy is to set them right as to the facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure."

Abraham Lincoln said:
"We, the people are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts, not to overthrow the Constitution, but to overthrow men who pervert the Constitution."

Right to defense against corrupted governments:

"The Constitution of most of our states (and of the United States) assert that all power is inherent in the people; that they may exercise it by themselves; that it is their right and duty to be at all times armed and that they are entitled to freedom of person, freedom of religion, freedom of property, and freedom of press." Thomas Jefferson

In Response

by: Lapazjim from: USA
July 10, 2013 10:28 AM
Well Vickie where did the worst corruption start? Where did countries learn the best way corruption can serve individuals? What is a democratic system actually do? Well the first two answers are the US. The third answer would be that it promotes corruption,but in a backdoor way.Remember you can not make it in politics in a democratic society without being corrupt in some way.This is why the Forefathers of this country are rolling over in their graves.This is not what they intended for this country,but this is what their dreams have evolved into!!!

In Response

by: Ron
July 10, 2013 9:19 AM
Don't know where you are living, but here in flyspeck USA, the whites are on welfare, too. As a matter of fact, its only the whites, because they hate everyone else. Welfare is not a racial issue, but I would agree the illegal immigrants are a problem. Just remember, the gov LIKES having people on welfare. You have a huge army of people who will defend our criminal government to make sure they eat for free.


by: MikeB from: Canada
July 10, 2013 8:37 AM
Coming from Canada you don’t see the bribes and corruption on a daily basis and daily life. No one bribes a doctor or police officer or any front line public servant. That’s all saved for the politicians and business owners at all levels, from the small town to the large cities. This has been shown all too true in Montreal of late. I’m sure if a corruption probe was issued for any city in the country, including the aboriginal population we would find widespread corruption, kick backs, fraud, theft, etc. I don’t believe everyone is part of the problem but it is everywhere. All done behind the scenes.

In Response

by: DavidD from: Canada
July 10, 2013 11:43 PM
Yes, in Canada we don't have corruption on daily basis but what we have is called corrupt nepotism. For example if you want to see an ENT doctor in days not in months he or she must be your close relative or close friend. So majority who have no connection to these specialists are left to wait for months.


by: Satish Raj from: Boston, MA
July 10, 2013 8:35 AM
7 Billion people on the planet and most of them expecting services from government. Stop calling it corruption and call it what it really is - PREMIUM for attention. I do not condone corruption - but lets face it, when government pokes its nose, where it does not belong, then, it cannot focus, where it really needs to.


by: Don Darkes from: South Africa
July 10, 2013 8:31 AM
Sadly South Africa did not feature on the graph or survey. The electorate on both sides of the political spectrum will not deny that bribery and corruption are rife in the government.


by: Fareed Ansari from: San Francisco
July 10, 2013 8:12 AM
Some misguided individual recently popularized that Greed is good, and the weak were predictably negatively impacted. So much so that some in the Greed community have given money a bad name as their bazaar behavior comes to light. The love of money is the root of all evil. 1 Timothy 6-10.


by: Owen Iverson
July 10, 2013 8:01 AM
i think this is a good thing. the article starts off saying it's "perceived" to be on the increase. that tells me there's more awareness happening, but maybe not so much that there's actually more.

i think this trend will become more and more common as more of the world becomes connected to the internet. i forget who said it first, but the world isn't getting more violent, it's getting more televised.


by: Concerned for USA from: West USA
July 10, 2013 7:53 AM
Natural gas fracking is greed at it's best. Wells are leaking everywhere, making ghost towns, affecting US citizens and spoiling our true greatest resource, WATER. The oil companies own this country and they have paid off most of our politicians with campaign contributions/bribes, our president included. Wake up people.. OUR children are going to reep what our corrupt governments are sewing today. Sad to see our country in this position.


by: pauld from: australia
July 10, 2013 1:46 AM
Totally rife in all levels of government here in australia.(the lucky country).Only after first hand experience had l realized how bad it is. Dealing with local government as a small business company over many years to find out how corrupt .It only takes a few at the top to have total control .The ones that benefit are mega rich in a small town of 4500 population.Many locals know whats happening yet are powerless to do anything.That is just one story .l could probably write a book. But at the end of day l ask myself where is justice and will it ever come.Doubt it.


by: Fred from: Worcester
July 09, 2013 10:14 PM
Spin it right and you may not see the corruption and bribes here.
Give it a new name and that makes it OK.
Consider the back room deals for Obamacare.
Consider "Landrieu’s Louisiana Purchase"
And all the special union deals.

The U.S. has quite a bit of corruption and bribery wrapped in nice words.

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