News / USA

Ex-Governor's Corruption Trial Has Lurid Sideshow

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, right, and his wife Maureen, center, leave Federal court after a motions hearing in Richmond, Va., May 19, 2014.
Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, right, and his wife Maureen, center, leave Federal court after a motions hearing in Richmond, Va., May 19, 2014.

The corruption trial of a former governor of an American state who was once a serious White House contender is captivating the nation with tales of excess and lurid details of a broken marriage.
 
Bob and Maureen McDonnell are on trial in Virginia’s capital, Richmond, facing 14 charges, including accepting bribes and obstructing an investigation. If convicted, both could face up to twenty years in prison.
 
The government asserted that the ex-governor and his wife took $120,000 in loans and $50,000 in gifts from Richmond businessman Jonnnie Williams. 
 
Prosecutors say Williams was hoping to get the governor and Virginia’s “First Lady” to provide state assistance and personal endorsements to Williams’ company Star Scientific, which was selling dietary supplements.
 
Luxury shopping sprees, cash loans

The prosecution’s case detailed, among other things, expensive shopping sprees for Maureen McDonnell and substantial cash loans to the couple to help them recover from several soured real estate investments, Williams allegedly picked up the tab for the McDonnell’s daughter’s wedding and provided the governor with a Rolex watch with a special inscription.
 
To increase the pressure on the McDonnells, the government granted Jonnie Williams immunity from prosecution in exchange for his cooperation.
 
“If he did not have immunity, he would very likely be in the same boat as the McDonnells because he has as much as admitted that he showered the McDonnells with gifts in order to get benefits from the governor,” said University of Richmond law professor Henry Chambers. “That he appears to have been unsuccessful does not matter.”
 
Williams told the court that Maureen McDonnell never told him that his gifts were excessive or inappropriate. The businessman also testified that he was never told by the governor to stop showering them with gifts and favors.
 
In late 2013, as the pre-indictment investigation into the McDonnells was underway, the couple said it repaid Williams for the wedding expenses and the loans. They said they also returned the Rolex watch. But to federal investigators, those actions did not cancel out acts they considered to be criminal.
 
Defense strategy

The McDonnells’ defense team has come up with a strategy that plays to the weakness of Virginia’s official ethics laws. They assert that it was Maureen McDonnell, not the ex-governor, who was responsible for the actions connected to Jonnie Williams. They say Virginia regulations on behavior by officials don’t apply to spouses.
 
“The most important point is to focus on the notion that Maureen McDonnell did not conspire with Bob McDonnell, and that Jonnie Williams got nothing more than any motivated Virginia businessman should get from a governor – help promoting a Virginia product that the governor appeared to believe in,” Chambers said.
 
To try to make that more convincing, the ex-governor’s lawyers have portrayed Maureen McDonnell as a cold, difficult, even unstable person who had lost her affections for her husband. She turned instead to an infatuation with Williams, who allegedly responded with money and gifts.
 
But on the witness stand, Williams threw cold water on that story, saying “I didn’t know she had any interest in me until this past week. No, I’ve never had any contact with Mrs. McDonnell, any physical contact. Period.”
 
Close personal relationship

FILE - In this May 5, 2011 file photo provided by the office of the Governor of Virginia, Jonnie Williams left, and Maureen McDonnell, wife of then Gov. Bob McDonnell, pose for a photo.FILE - In this May 5, 2011 file photo provided by the office of the Governor of Virginia, Jonnie Williams left, and Maureen McDonnell, wife of then Gov. Bob McDonnell, pose for a photo.
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FILE - In this May 5, 2011 file photo provided by the office of the Governor of Virginia, Jonnie Williams left, and Maureen McDonnell, wife of then Gov. Bob McDonnell, pose for a photo.
FILE - In this May 5, 2011 file photo provided by the office of the Governor of Virginia, Jonnie Williams left, and Maureen McDonnell, wife of then Gov. Bob McDonnell, pose for a photo.

However, evidence indicates that Maureen McDonnell and Williams had a close personal relationship, having been seen together numerous times at events and elsewhere. And the court was told that the two of them made more than 1,200 phone calls and text messages to each other between April 2011 and February 2013.
 
As part of that “estranged, unstable wife” legal positioning, the ex-governor testified that he moved out of their house in July, shortly before the trial began.
 
"I didn’t want to go home,” he told the court. “I didn’t have the emotional capacity to go home.”  
 
The ex-governor’s lawyers said they if he did assist Williams, it was only part of his role as Virginia’s chief executive to promote jobs and economic growth in the state.
 
What's next?

The case has yet to go to the jury, which is made up of 12 citizens picked before the trial began.
 
And that jury selection process will matter greatly when those dozen people soon decide whether Robert, or Maureen McDonnell – or both of them – are guilty of the federal charges against them.
 
“The prosecution,” Attorney Jacob Frenkel told Fox News, “wants jurors who are going to be offended by graft, who are offended by people who have their hand out.”
 
But Frenkel added, “On the other hand, what the defense wants are jurors who are going to be sympathetic, [who] view the McDonnells as popular, effective public officials.”


Jeffrey Young

Jeffrey Young came to the “Corruption” beat after years of doing news analysis, primarily on global strategic issues such as nuclear proliferation.  During most of 2013, he was on special assignment in Baghdad and elsewhere with the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR).  Previous VOA activities include VOA-TV, where he created the “How America Works” and “How America Elects” series, and the “Focus” news analysis unit.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: John from: Juneau Alaska
August 25, 2014 12:54 PM
The governor returned the Rolex when he got caught. Thats a great idea. Does it mean that every black person who is put in jail for stealing something can get out by returning whatever it was he or she stole?

by: Bob sackimanow from: USA
August 25, 2014 12:40 PM
So you're the Voice of America? I thought you were tasked with providing relevant news to those around the world, especially those in oppressed nations. So you think a trial regarding the former Governor of Virginia and his wife fits the criteria of your mission? Please.
In Response

by: Jeffrey Young from: VOA Washington
August 26, 2014 12:51 PM
Mr. Sackimanow:

I am VOA's "corruption correspondent" - my "beat" covers acts of improper behavior by elected officials and others, and the effort to mitigate such activity. The McDonnell trial piece here was done to show that high level officials in the United States can and do get put in the dock for their behavior when it is deemed to cross legal boundaries. If you put my name in search on voanews.com you will see quite a number of reports involving official corruption and what's being done to address it.

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