News / Middle East

Could Egypt be Headed for Civil Conflict?

Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi hold up signs during a protest demanding that Mursi resign at Tahrir Square in Cairo, July 2, 2013.
Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi hold up signs during a protest demanding that Mursi resign at Tahrir Square in Cairo, July 2, 2013.
Cecily Hilleary
Egypt is poised for a major confrontation as the president and his supporters hunker down in the face of hundreds of thousands jamming city squares and streets demanding the government step down and as the military waits in the wings, ready to step in and impose its own solution to the ongoing dispute.

President Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood supporters have rejected an army ultimatum giving him two days to come to an agreement with the opposition demonstrators.

Mohamed Al-Beltagy, the general secretary for the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party, is urging supporters into the streets to prevent what they are saying amounts to a military coup, adding, “We’re ready to give our lives for the country and the people.”

And the Brotherhood’s media spokesman, Gehad El-Haddad, sent this message to the opposition via the social media site Twitter:  “We can't keep running elections until #MB [Muslim Brotherhood] loses. Come up with a better strategy or accept democratic outcomes.”


The Army issued its ultimatum on Monday, saying it was designed to push the politicians into reaching a consensus and that the military was responding to the “pulse of the Egyptian street.”    

Michael Collins Dunn, editor of the Middle East Journal of the Middle East Institute in Washington, D.C., says there is merit to the claim.
 
“I think that it’s a clear case that a lot of people have been suggesting that military intervention might be the only solution, including some of the same people who, a little over a year ago, wanted to get rid of SCAF [the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces], and now they seem to be getting their wish,” Dunn said.
 
But Dunn conceded that the opposition drive to get Morsi out of office only a year after he won the presidency in a democratic election may seem unfair to many.
 
“On the other hand, I think Morsi’s done very little to reach out to the opposition,” he said. “He’s done very little to bring various elements of society together.  He’s virtually ignored the Copts, to the point that mistreatment of Copts has increased. 

“He has clearly done very little for the economy,” Dunn continued.  “He has sort of said, ‘Look I won by 51 percent so now I get to do whatever I want to.’”
 
Egyptian journalist, and activist Wael Abbas figured prominently in Egypt’s 2011 uprising and says Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood brought most of the troubles on themselves.
 
“The Muslim Brotherhood’s stupidity is what led us here,” said Abbas.  “Morsi tried to take all powers for himself and he did not allow any factions of the opposition to participate and he didn’t take our advice. 
 
“And instead of cleaning up the old corrupt system in Egypt, he infiltrated it with elements of the Muslim Brotherhood,” Abbas said. “He put them as ministers, as governors, even in lower positions in all the governmental institutions.”
 
Abbas points back to the original demands of the revolution:  The overthrow of former president Hosni Mubarak, an end to emergency laws, a representative constitution, transparent elections, term limits, economic improvements and justice for those killed by police and military in the revolution. 

“Nobody, not the Army, not the Muslim Brotherhood, has fulfilled the demands of the revolution yet,” Abbas said. “We are seeing trials that are charades.  Police officers who killed protesters are being freed on claims of self-defense.  Nobody has avenged the martyrs of the revolution, and now people are welcoming the army again, despite the fact that the army has put tens of thousands of citizens on trial before illegal military tribunals and put them in jail.”

So what happens next in Egypt? As of Tuesday, the choice seemed to be either Morsi and the opposition work out an agreement whereby he institutes the reforms the Army and demonstrators are demanding—or the army, with the support of the people on the ground, intervenes to bring him down. 

That, says Dunn, could lead to a “nightmare scenario,” similar to what happened in Algeria during the 1990s: “Where the Islamists say, ‘All right, we can’t win democratically, because you are going to take away our victory, so we’re going to win by military action.’

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 03, 2013 12:36 PM
Egypt is not an inch near a civil war. Egypt just wants to correct the error made in 2012 when Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood was mistakenly handed the fate of Egypt. The army made that mistake; the army wants to correct it. The platform is provided by the good people of Egypt themselves fed up with the falsehood that Muslim Brotherhood means to the country. The most grievous mistake is that Egypt has been forced to operate not a national constitution but the constitution of the Muslim Brotherhood.

This eliminated positions of the liberals, moderates, secular, Christians and other minorities, and instituted the hateful conservative barbarism and vendetta of extremist Islam. It gets to the point and the people of Egypt rose to demand to be ruled in proper manners. So if the army takes over, it is because it wants to continue from where it stopped until it provides a proper constitution for Egypt that embodies the tenets of democratic practices worldwide, since there is no democracy in Islam. Simply put, Egypt is on the road to reversing and correcting history, but it does not lead to a civil war even though there be an initial civil unrest because of extremists in the country.


by: P Smith from: Chicago
July 02, 2013 5:28 PM
Morsi won the election. He is president. Egypt can replace him in the next election. Let this be a lesson to them for electing a jerk.


by: john s. from: usa
July 02, 2013 5:16 PM
Egypt is not "Headed" for civil conflict. Egypt has been in a civil conflict since they deposed Mubarak. Morsi's election was the nail in the coffin and we see now further turmoil. Unfortunately Egypt could become another Iraq or Syria. Religious sects, Islamists and the unwillingness to accept civilized dissension is coming very close to a full civil war... Let us hope that this will not happen. In the meantime, America should stay out of the conflict as it is proven that no matter who gets the upper hand, both, winners and losers will always blame the USA for their mess. So much for Obama's naive ideas that we can become friends with the Middle East masses.

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