News / Africa

    Craft Beer Boom Sweeps South Africa

    Part 1 of a five-part series about a surprising success for small brewers

    Craft breweries are popping up all over South Africa. Dirk van Tonder’s rustic "beer farm” in South Africa’s Northwest Province is one of more than 70 breweries specializing in revolutionary new beer flavors. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    Craft breweries are popping up all over South Africa. Dirk van Tonder’s rustic "beer farm” in South Africa’s Northwest Province is one of more than 70 breweries specializing in revolutionary new beer flavors. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    Darren Taylor
    Bottles clinked and clanked as Gerry de Souza, wearing a broad smile and a pen behind his ear, filled newly constructed shiny silver shelves with scores of beers from microbreweries all over South Africa.
     
    “I’ve [sold] craft beers for probably the last 20 years. I’ve tried to make a market out of it, but it’s only really, really taken off probably in the last three years…. It’s actually come in and taken over. As I get them, I just put them on the shelf,” he said, while recording his stock on a list.
     
    De Souza, who owns Linden Discount Liquor store in Johannesburg, heaved six-packs of bright-gold blonde ale, with subtle aromas and slight fruitiness, out of their boxes. Then he sorted through varieties of German-style Weiss [wheat] beer, hazy and straw-colored and boasting flavors of banana, cloves and freshly baked bread. Next he turned his attention to a consignment of Saison, orange-hued and Belgian in style, containing strong suggestions of coriander, ginger and citrus.
     
    Before de Souza could price some of the specialty beers, a customer began loading them into his basket.
     
    “That’s what happens!” laughed the genial, talkative de Souza. “People will walk in and as soon as they see a new craft beer, they go for it. They don’t ask the price; they don’t care what it is; they just want to try a new craft beer….”
     
    Listen to Darren Taylor interviews about craft beers
    Listen to Darren Taylor interviews about craft beersi
    || 0:00:00
    ...    
     
    X

    He added that demand for craft brew had grown “like a tidal wave” in the past six months.
     
    “I’ve had this business for more than 20 years now and I’ve never seen a change in buying habits like this. One minute I was selling a few bottles a month and now I have to order new stock once a week.”
     
    De Souza said his sales of craft beers has risen by 120 percent in the past year, and by 500 percent in the past five years.
     
    The art of making craft beer
     
    Craft beer, also called artisanal beer, is handcrafted in small, independent breweries and not mass-produced in factories. It contains no chemicals or preservatives, only “pure” inputs – usually hops, barley, malt, yeast and water. Its flavors develop naturally and it’s generally much tastier than commercial beer. Depending on the ingredients used, its flavors can vary greatly – from honey and chocolate to tropical fruits and spices.
     
    • Bars and restaurants serving craft beer are opening all over South Africa. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    • Dirk van Tonder’s simple brewery on his “beer farm” in South Africa’s Northwest Province. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    • Some specialty beers made by Moritz Kallmeyer of Drayman’s Brewery are on sale at a liquor store in Johannesburg. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    • Demand for artisanal, handcrafted beer shows no sign of decreasing soon in South Africa. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    • The author of "African Brew," Lucy Corne, prefers the bitterness of what afcionados call hoppy beer. I could drink several of them!” she said with laughter. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    • Brewer Andre de Beer’s signature craft brew is an American-style pale ale. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    • South African women are also starting to drink beer; previously this was rare. (Photo Credit: South African Breweries)
    • "We get packed every weekend; it’s insane,” says one of South Africa’s leading microbrewers, Steve Gilroy, who welcomes customers to his brewery near Johannesburg. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)
    • Gilroy once struggled to sell his beer … Now his brewhouse is packed every weekend. (Photo Credit: Darren Taylor)

    Craft brews take longer to produce, are made in small quantities and use more expensive ingredients, so they’re pricier than beers made on a large scale.

    "Craft beer takes chances and is different in terms of its full flavors,” said Andre de Beer, the man with the most appropriate name in South Africa’s craft beer sector and the owner of the Cockpit Brewery in the diamond mining town of Cullinan in Gauteng province.
     
    “Craft beer is made by somebody that’s got a passion for it, and that passion will show in the end product. Commercial beer, unfortunately quite too often, is brewed by accountants. Their job is to churn out beer that doesn’t take any chances, beer that appeals to as wide as possible an audience."

    Brewer Dirk van Tonder took it a step further. He spoke from his “beer farm” surrounded by dry bush and rugged, rocky mountains at Broederstroom in Northwest province: “For me, craft beer should actually be artistic beer because it’s also an art. Most of the craft breweries that are working with it passionately, they are artists; they are beer artists.”
     
    In Johannesburg, Jurie Blomerus has built an entire business around craft beer – the Stanley Beer Yard. Its decor is eclectic, including the heads of dead buffalo and antelope on the walls, religious effigies and cattle whips.
     
    Blomerus keeps his customers doused with a range of exclusive brews as the woeful and sometimes utterly depressing strains of country music wash over them. “It makes people drink more,” he said, laughing.
     
    Blomerus said he decided to sell craft beer because it’s special.
     
    “There’s a saying in wine circles that for wine to be good you must taste the vine, not the vat. It’s the same with [craft] beer. The way it’s brewed and the way it’s nurtured, you can taste it. It’s not as gassy; it actually has distinctive flavors….”
     
    Chefs recommend beers to pair with foods
     
    De Souza’s sales and Blomerus’s bar are just two of many indicators of South Africa’s explosion in craft beer.
     
    Just a few years ago, there were a handful of microbreweries in the country. Now, there are more than 70, with the number set to increase significantly in the near future. Pubs and restaurants selling artisanal beer are opening all over. Festivals dedicated to craft beer are ubiquitous. Women are drinking and brewing craft beer. Websites are selling craft beer.

    Winemakers are abandoning the vines to make beer; elderly brewers who once worked for South African Breweries [SAB] are coming out of retirement to make craft beer. People walk the streets wearing caps and t-shirts bearing the names and logos of their favorite microbreweries. Craft brewing clubs have sprung up in all major cities. Chefs are advising customers to pair food with beer. Craft beer brewers are being invited to sell their products at a variety of public events – including recently to a sex expo and another about home decoration. Newspapers and magazines are filled with articles on beer, breweries and brewers.
     
    “I get fed up of hearing the phrase ‘craft beer,’ to be honest. It’s just everywhere, all the time,” said Lucy Corne, snickering as she humbly acknowledged her major role in helping to drive the boom. Her recent book, African Brew: Exploring the Craft of South African Beer, is the country’s bible of craft beer.
     
    “South Africa is currently riding the cusp of a beer revolution,” said de Beer. “We’re living in very exciting times. The variety of beer that has become available is amazing, and it’s such good news.”
     
    Van Tonder added, “It’s very, very exciting. We’re standing at the threshold here of a whole industry opening up.”
     
    Another of South Africa’s top microbrewers, Moritz Kallmeyer, who opened Drayman’s Brewery in Pretoria in 1997, said he can’t quite believe that South Africa is finally acquiring “a culture of good beer.”
     
    He reflected, “I was sitting here one evening drinking a beer, contemplating the early years, and I actually got quite emotional when I suddenly realized that what I had been praying for suddenly is upon me…. And that at one weekend festival I made more money than I made in the first year of starting Drayman’s.”
     
    But amid all the hype around craft beer, Kallmeyer said it’s essential for all concerned in the blossoming industry to remember the times when microbrewers battled to survive in a country where beer drinkers were accustomed only to consuming bland, mass-produced lagers and pilsners.
     
    “We mustn’t get arrogant,” he insisted. “Let’s remember where we come from ….”
     
    Ignorance and hard times
     
    Kallmeyer’s original profession was biokinetics, the science of movement. He rehabilitated many injured athletes and people ill with chronic diseases through carefully structured exercise programs. He said his family and friends thought he was “mad” when he abandoned his career to make beer.
     
    “Looking back, I was!” he exclaimed. Then he became subdued, and serious.
     
    “For me that was an extremely painful survival period of my life…. I had very little money to start the brewery. My wife and I were poor. We survived by selling a keg or two every now and again,” Kallmeyer reflected.
     
    His first beer was an English bitter ale.
     
    “People viewed it with great suspicion. At first no one wanted to drink this ‘strange’ beer that I was making,” Kallmeyer said. “I had to become a public spokesperson for my own product. Who else was going to go out there and tell people, ‘This beer is not yellow; it’s red. It is bitter and it’s got lower carbonation and it’s got a lot more flavor than lager.’”
     
    When Kallmeyer offered his wheat beer, a style that’s naturally cloudy, “things got worse,” he said, laughing. “They told me, ‘What is this dishwater you are giving us?’ Up until recently South Africans thought a beer had to be yellow and it had to be clear and fizzy in order for it to be a beer. They were very unsophisticated in terms of beer.”
     
    A man with similar experiences is Lex Mitchell, the undisputed pioneer of craft beer in South Africa. In 1983, he opened the country’s first – and for a long time, only – independent microbrewery, in the coastal town of Knysna, also making English-style ale.
     
    “My beer was treated like an outcast back then. I had to go out and teach people that what I was making was beer, because South Africans were only used to drinking commercial beer,” said Mitchell.
     
    He added, “I always felt isolated. I felt this way right up until a few years ago. But now the consuming public has picked up on craft beer in a big way and that was the element that was needed to allow it to explode.”
     
    Steve Gilroy received his license to brew on April Fools’ Day in 2000.
     
    “It should have been a sign, shouldn’t it?” he dead-panned, stroking his long white beard  while talkimg about the craft his brewery and restaurant in Muldersdrift, near Johannesburg.
     
    “It was difficult in the beginning. Very difficult. South Africans are still very loyal to SAB beer and to get them to taste anything else – especially my British-style ales – was like climbing a mountain,” he told VOA.
     
    During his first eight years of business Gilroy remembered spending every weekend in liquor stores “pleading” with people to try his beer. Now, he puts up “Full House” signs at his brewery every weekend.
     
    “What day is it today, Tuesday? We’re already fully booked for Saturday; we’re fully booked for Sunday. We’ve got no space. We get packed every weekend; it’s insane.”
     
    'It just blows me away'
     
    The trailblazer microbrewers, accustomed to struggling to keep their enterprises and passions afloat, have been surprised at the speed at which craft beer in South Africa has taken off.
     
    “I must admit, I did not see this coming -- not in my wildest dreams,” said van Tonder, sipping amber ale on the shady porch of his rustic pub.
     
    Kallmeyer said, “It was like overnight! It’s taken off like a snowstorm the last two years.”
     
    Mitchell, who fought an often-lonely battle for almost 30 years to open up the world of craft beer to South Africans, admitted that he never foresaw victory.
     
    “It’s taken me by surprise. I’ve known all along that a few stalwarts were making good beer, but to suddenly see this profusion of microbreweries is surprising – almost shocking.”
     
    Kallmeyer constantly reflects on the past – “to maintain perspective, to keep my feet on the ground,” he said, adding: “I used to dream that one day South Africans would wake up and smell the beer, that they would develop a taste for ‘real’ beer. But after more than 10 years as a craft brewer, my dream was dying.

    "Now, to see my dream alive and actually happening, it just blows me away.”
     
    And growing numbers of South African beer drinkers are themselves being blown away by the sudden array of choices available to them.
     
    In South Africa, the beer revolution rolls on, with little sign of slowing down soon.

    You May Like

    Hope Remains for Rio Olympic Games, Despite Woes

    Facing a host of problems, Rio prepares for holding the games but experts say some risks, like Zika, may not be as grave as initially thought

    IS Use of Social Media to Recruit, Radicalize Still a Top Threat to US

    Despite military gains against IS in Iraq and Syria, their internet propaganda still commands an audience; US officials see 'the most complex challenge that the federal government and industry face'

    ‘Time Is Now’ to Save Africa’s Animals From Poachers, Activist Says

    During Zimbabwe visit, African Wildlife Foundation President Kaddu Sebunya says poaching hurts Africa as slave trade once did

    By the Numbers

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Ivorian Chocolate Makers Promote Locally-made Chocolatei
    X
    July 29, 2016 4:02 PM
    Ivory Coast is the world's top producer of cocoa but hardly any of it is processed into chocolate there. Instead, the cocoa is sent abroad to chocolate makers in Europe and elsewhere. This is a general problem throughout Africa – massive exports of raw materials but few finished goods. As Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, several Ivorian entrepreneurs are working to change that formula - 100 percent Ivorian chocolate bar at a time.
    Video

    Video Ivorian Chocolate Makers Promote Locally-made Chocolate

    Ivory Coast is the world's top producer of cocoa but hardly any of it is processed into chocolate there. Instead, the cocoa is sent abroad to chocolate makers in Europe and elsewhere. This is a general problem throughout Africa – massive exports of raw materials but few finished goods. As Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, several Ivorian entrepreneurs are working to change that formula - 100 percent Ivorian chocolate bar at a time.
    Video

    Video Tesla Opens Battery-Producing Gigafactory

    Two years after starting to produce electric cars, U.S. car maker Tesla Motors has opened the first part of its huge battery manufacturing plant, which will eventually cover more than a square kilometer. Situated close to Reno, Nevada, the so-called Gigafactory will eventually produce more lithium-ion batteries than were made worldwide in 2013. VOA's George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Polio-affected Afghan Student Fulfilling Her Dreams in America

    Afghanistan is one of only two countries in the world where children still get infected by polio. The other is Pakistan. Mahbooba Akhtarzada who is from Afghanistan, was disabled by polio, but has managed to overcome the obstacles caused by this crippling disease. VOA's Zheela Nasari caught up with Akhtarzada and brings us this report narrated by Bronwyn Benito.
    Video

    Video Hillary Clinton Promises to Build a 'Better Tomorrow'

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton urged voters Thursday not to give in to the politics of fear. She vowed to unite the country and move it forward if elected in November. Clinton formally accepted the Democratic Party's nomination at its national convention in Philadelphia. VOA national correspondent Jim Malone has more.
    Video

    Video Trump Tones Down Praise for Russia

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is toning down his compliments for Russia and Vladimir Putin as such rhetoric got him in trouble recently. After calling on Russia to find 30.000 missing emails from rival Hillary Clinton, Trump told reporters he doesn't know Putin and never called him a great leader, just one who's better than President Barack Obama. Putin has welcomed Trump's overtures, but, as Zlatica Hoke reports, ordinary Russians say they are not putting much faith in Trump.
    Video

    Video Uganda Unveils its First Solar-powered Bus

    A solar-powered bus described by its Ugandan makers as the first in Africa has made its public debut. Kiira Motors' electric bus, Kayoola, displayed recently at a stadium in Uganda's capital. From Kampala, Maurice Magorane filed this report narrated by Salem Solomon.
    Video

    Video Silicon Valley: More Than A Place, It's a Culture

    Silicon Valley is a technology powerhouse and a place that companies such as Google, Facebook and Apple call home. It is a region in northern California that stretches from San Francisco to San Jose. But, more than that, it's known for its startup culture. VOA's Elizabeth Lee went inside one company to find out what it's like to work in a startup.
    Video

    Video Immigrant Delegate Marvels at Democratic Process

    It’s been a bitter and divisive election season – but first time Indian-American delegate Dr. Shashi Gupta headed to the Democratic National Convention with a sense of hope. VOA’s Katherine Gypson followed this immigrant with the love of U.S. politics all the way to Philadelphia.
    Video

    Video Dutch Entrepreneurs Turn Rainwater Into Beer

    June has been recorded as one of the wettest months in more than a century in many parts of Europe. To a group of entrepreneurs in Amsterdam the rain came as a blessing, as they used the extra water to brew beer. Serginho Roosblad has more to the story.
    Video

    Video Commerce Thrives on US-Mexico Border

    At the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this week, the party’s presumptive presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, is expected to attack proposals made by her opponent, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Last Friday, President Barack Obama hosted his Mexican counterpart, President Enrique Peña Nieto, to underscore the good relations between the two countries. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Tucson.
    Video

    Video Film Helps Save Ethiopian Children Thought to be Cursed

    'Omo Child' looks at effort of African man to stop killings of ‘mingi’ children
    Video

    Video London’s Financial Crown at Risk as Rivals Eye Brexit Opportunities

    By most measures, London rivals New York as the only true global financial center. But Britain’s vote to leave the European Union – so-called ‘Brexit’ – means the city could lose its right to sell services tariff-free across the bloc, risking its position as Europe’s financial headquarters. Already some banks have said they may shift operations to the mainland. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora