News / Middle East

At Least One Student Killed in Clashes With Police in Cairo

A man stands outside a faculty building at Cairo's Al-Azhar University, December 28, 2013.A man stands outside a faculty building at Cairo's Al-Azhar University, December 28, 2013.
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A man stands outside a faculty building at Cairo's Al-Azhar University, December 28, 2013.
A man stands outside a faculty building at Cairo's Al-Azhar University, December 28, 2013.
Reuters
One student was killed on Saturday when supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood fought with Egyptian police at the Cairo campus of Al-Azhar University, state media reported.
 
Shaimaa Mounir, a student activist, told Reuters that the dead student was Khaled El-Haddad, a supporter of the Brotherhood that was designated this week as a terrorist organisation by the state.
 
The violence followed clashes across the country on Friday in which at least five people died.
 
State-run newspaper Al-Ahram said that security forces on Saturday fired teargas to disperse pro-Brotherhood students who were preventing their classmates from entering university buildings to take exams.
 
Protesters threw rocks at police and set tires on fire to counter the teargas. Al-Ahram quoted a health ministry official as saying that one student had been killed and four injured.
 
Two college buildings caught fire in the violence. State TV broadcast footage of black smoke billowing from the faculty of commerce building and said “terrorist students” had set the agriculture faculty building on fire as well.
 
Police arrested 60 students for possession of makeshift weapons including petrol bombs, according to an emailed statement from the interior ministry. Calm had been restored, and scheduled exams had begun after the morning clashes.
 
Al-Azhar, a respected centre of Sunni Islamic learning, has for months been the scene of protests against what the Brotherhood calls a “military coup” that deposed Islamist Mohamed Morsi as president after a year in office.
 
Supporters of the Brotherhood took to the streets on Friday after the government designated the Islamist group a terrorist organization - a move that increases the penalties for dissent against the government installed after the army ousted Morsi in July following mass protests against his rule.
 
The widening crackdown against the movement that was elected into power after the toppling of veteran leader Hosni Mubarak in 2011 has increased tension in a country suffering the worst internal strife of its modern history following Morsi's ousting.
 
An Egyptian pritzel vender sits next to copies of the new constitution sold on a street in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013.An Egyptian pritzel vender sits next to copies of the new constitution sold on a street in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013.
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An Egyptian pritzel vender sits next to copies of the new constitution sold on a street in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013.
An Egyptian pritzel vender sits next to copies of the new constitution sold on a street in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013.
Constitution vote
 
The army-backed government appears bent on clamping down on dissent ahead of a referendum next month on a new constitution, a step that will pave the way for parliamentary and presidential elections.
 
Thousands of Brotherhood members have been arrested. More than 250 Brotherhood supporters were arrested on Friday alone using the new classification.
 
Analysts say the government decision points to the influence wielded by hawks in security services. Some officials, including Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim, were appointed by Morsi but sided with the army and have been key players in the security crackdown since the Islamist president's ouster.
 
Human Rights Watch said on Saturday that the government's designation of the Brotherhood as a terrorist group was “politically driven” and intended to end all of the movement's activities.
 
“By rushing to point the finger at the Brotherhood without investigations or evidence, the government seems motivated solely by its desire to crush a major opposition movement.” said Sarah Leah Whitson of the New York-based rights group.
 
A conservative estimate puts the overall death toll since Morsi's fall at well over 1,500.
 
The government has not provided evidence linking the Brotherhood to the recent attacks on security forces and state institutions.
 
Authorities accused the Brotherhood of carrying out a suicide attack on a police station that killed 16 people on Tuesday, though it was claimed by a radical faction based in the Sinai Peninsula.

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by: Srg. Bernard Queen from: LAPD
December 28, 2013 11:02 PM
the Muslim Brotherhood is Al Qaeda - Ayman al-Zawahiri is a member is good standing... the Muslim Brotherhood have been making inroads into our Democratic Party for a long time... they have taken over our prison system... inserted Aids into our political organizations... CARE...masquerading as a humanitarian organization... Muslim subversives...

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