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Deadly Violence in Sudan Following Fuel Subsidy Cut

Escalating protests in Sudan against the government's decision to cut fuel subsidies have left at least six people dead in the capital, Khartoum.

The protesters were killed on Wednesday during clashes with security forces. Police fired tear gas at stone-throwing demonstrators who blocked roads and set buildings on fire.

Some protesters called for the ouster of President Omar al-Bashir, who has ruled Sudan since seizing power in 1989.

The protests began on Monday after the government announced it was suspending fuel subsidies in a bid to help the economy. On Sunday, President Bashir said the subsidies had reached a level that was "dangerous" for Sudan's economy.

The suspension caused a sharp rise in fuel prices. The move angered many citizens who took to the streets in protest. At least two people were killed in demonstrations earlier in the week.

Sudan's fuel crisis began after South Sudan became independent in 2011. The new nation took about three-quarters of Sudan's crude oil production.

The United States urged calm on Wednesday. The U.S. embassy in Khartoum called for all sides to avoid further violence and respect civil liberties.

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