News / Middle East

Death Toll in Iraq Attacks Hits 115

People inspect the aftermath of a car bomb attack in Baghdad's Shiite enclave of Sadr City, Iraq, July 23, 2012.
People inspect the aftermath of a car bomb attack in Baghdad's Shiite enclave of Sadr City, Iraq, July 23, 2012.
TEXT SIZE - +
VOA News
Iraqi officials say at least 115 people have now died after Monday's massive string of attacks across the country.

A car bomb exploded late Monday near a cafe in a Shi'ite neighborhood in the capital, Baghdad, killing at least five people and wounding 24 others.

The wave of coordinated bombings and shootings wounded more than 200 people in 15 cities, in what was the deadliest day of violence in Iraq in more than two years.  The last time the casualty toll reached that high was on May 10, 2010.

This Year's Deadliest Attacks in Iraq

  • Jul. 23: Bombing and shootings in Baghdad and across the country kill 115 people
  • Jul. 3:  Bombing across Iraq kills 40 people
  • Jun. 13: Bombings across Iraq targeting Shi'ite Muslim pilgrims kill at least 72 people
  • Jun. 4: Car bomb in Baghdad kills 23
  • Apr. 19: A mix of car and roadside bombs kills 35 across Iraq
  • Mar. 20: At least 12 near-simultaneous explosions erupt across Iraq, killing 46, wounding more than 200
  •  Feb. 23: Attacks in Baghdad and 11 other cities kill 55 people
  • Jan. 27: Car bomb near a funeral procession in Baghdad kills 31 people
The worst attack Monday was in Taji, 20 kilometers north of Baghdad, where nearly 40 people were killed.

There has been no claim of responsibility.

The United States condemned the attacks, but said that despite the setback, Iraq is not nearly as violent a place as it was in the past.

White House spokesman Jay Carney said Iraqi security forces have been trained and have the capacity to deal with their own security.

The violence comes after jihadist websites posted a message Saturday, purportedly from the leader of al-Qaida's affiliate in Iraq, saying the group is starting a "new phase."  The audio message from a speaker identified as Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi says the Islamic State of Iraq is planning to attack court officials, and to free prisoners.

In June, the group claimed responsibility for a wave of car bombings that killed 72 people and wounded nearly 260 others.

You May Like

Multimedia Relatives of South Korean Ferry Victims Fire at Authorities

46 people are confirmed dead, but some 250 remain trapped inside sunken ferry More

War Legacy Haunts Vietnam, US Relations

$84 million project aims to clean up soil contaminated by Agent Orange More

Wikipedia Proves Useful for Tracking Flu

Technique gave better results than Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Google’s Flu Trends More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Sphingomonas from: United States
July 24, 2012 10:07 AM
I am curious to know how the photographer managed to record two guys picking their noses in the same shot.


by: jeffmast from: McMinnville,Tennessee
July 24, 2012 9:52 AM
We knew that when the U.S. pulled out that Iraq would descend into an Islamic Hell because Islam is a religion of hate-no one but no one slaughters vmore Muslims than Muslims


by: Ahmed Hiyaru from: Ethiopia
July 24, 2012 9:35 AM
What is the problem here? still doing such activities?


by: Michael from: USA
July 24, 2012 8:21 AM
If the attackers want to issue in feudal rule, then they must adhere to the rule that states the vassals must be given complete access to economic, police/military, and government resources in order to properly serve the feudal lords. This gangland violence will never move up to that level of civilization


by: Tony Hogben from: Bribie Island, Queensland
July 24, 2012 7:02 AM
......what is the problem here.?......we were told "mission accomplished ".....some years ago.!!


by: ali watts from: australia
July 24, 2012 6:56 AM
Yes thank you america and the coalition of the willing for invading a country without wmd and leaving the country in turmoil.So much for stabilizing iraq from a dictator.hundreds of thousands killed in the war and still dying whilst americans grieve the loss of innocent people in their own country due to the inbuilt gene of kill everyone.When is the so called creditable men of the world going to bring forward the war crimes act on the american government leaders that created this mayhem in iraq,do they get of scot freeyet everyone else faces charges against humanity as a lot off so called dictators do

In Response

by: ali watts from: australia
July 25, 2012 2:37 AM
Anonymous if this means that its alright for you americans to kill any other nations people without having to face charges then you are a typical yank and if my comments help stop you lunatics coming to australia let me repeat america with its inbuilt killing gene that is used to kill its own people and other innocent civillians around the world.Then you lot cry when the gene goes haywire and you kill your own at home without even thinking of what your people have done to other countries people ,yeah maybe suddham did deserve it but not the innocent ,so shove your comment where the sun don,t shine

In Response

by: Anonymous
July 24, 2012 9:57 AM
Yeah, Iraq was in a much better place when they where invading their neighbors and being ground under Saddam's boot.

And way to poke us in the eye with the actions of 1 lunatic Joker fan. Your a heartless troll and bring down my high level of respect for Australia.

In Response

by: tom from: new york
July 24, 2012 9:38 AM
so much more complicated than that

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politicsi
X
Michael Eckels
April 19, 2014
There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politics

There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid