News / Middle East

Scores of Demonstrators Killed in Egypt

Behind Barricades, Some Egyptians Vow Resistancei
X
July 27, 2013 9:23 PM
Supporters of Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi say their sit-in protest tactics will continue despite bloody clashes with their political opponents and security forces. VOA's Elizabeth Arrott has more from Cairo.
VIDEO: Supporters of Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi say their sit-in protest tactics will continue despite bloody clashes with political opponents, security forces.
VOA News
Egyptian authorities say fighting between security forces and supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi has killed at least 74 people in Cairo and Alexandria since Friday.
 
In one of the bloodiest periods since the Egyptian military toppled President Morsi earlier this month and put him under house arrest, Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood movement say police fired into unarmed demonstrators in Cairo's Nasr City, where members have been camped for weeks demanding his reinstatement.
 
Egyptian official deny this, saying police only fired tear gas and that pro-Morsi marchers were responsible for the violence.
 
At a Saturday news conference, a spokesman for Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood movement Ahmed Arif also criticized Egyptian state media for what he described as biased coverage of the unrest.

Story continues below photo gallery
  • Bodies of Morsi supporters killed early Saturday in clashes with security forces are seen in a makeshift morgue in Cairo, July 27, 2013, (Elizabeth Arrott/VOA).
  • A Morsi supporter kisses the body of a woman killed in early morning clashes with security forces at Rabia el-Adawiya mosque in Cairo, July 27 2013, (Elizabeth Arrott/VOA).
  • A sheikh leads mourners in prayers at a makeshift morgue at Rabia el-Adawiya mosque in Cairo, July 27, 2013, (Elizabeth Arrott/VOA).
  • A woman mourns outside the pro-Morsi encampment in Cairo, July 27, 2013, (Elizabeth Arrott/VOA).
  • A boy shows a shotgun shell after clashes between Morsi supporters and security forces in Cairo, July 27, 2013, (Elizabeth Arrott/VOA).
  • A protester vows to carry on a sit-in by Morsi supporters after deadly clashes Saturday in Cairo, July 27, 2013, (Elizabeth Arrott/VOA).

In Alexandria, Egyptian authorities said people inside a mosque fired shots into the surrounding neighborhood Saturday while Morsi supporters say gunmen shot into the mosque.
 
Doctors at the field hospital in Cairo said they were being overwhelmed. The facility is located at the site of a sit-in in Cairo's Nasr City, a Muslim Brotherhood stronghold, where protesters have been camped for more than three weeks.
 
VOA correspondent Elizabeth Arrott in Nasr City says several make-shift brick walls have been built between where security forces and emergency personnel are massed and the edge of the protesters' encampment on Nasr Street. It is unclear who built them.
 
The interior minister said Saturday that the interim government hopes to dismantle the protest camp using "legal means." He also said Morsi would most likely be taken to the Torah prison near Cairo, where former president Hosni Mubarak and members of his cabinet were detained following the country's 2011 uprising.
 
World reaction
 
World leaders are expressing increasing concern about the rising violence, the polarization of Egyptian society, and the army's crackdown on Brotherhood leaders.
 
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry calls this period a pivotal moment for Egypt and warns that violence is a setback for reconciliation and democracy.
 
He says Egyptian authorities are morally and legally obligated to respect the right of free speech and assembly. He is calling for an impartial investigation into the latest violence.
 
Morsi has been held in secret military detention since July 3. Officials say they are investigating allegations that he conspired with the Palestinian militant group Hamas.
 
The Egyptian military dominated Egyptian politics for decades until the overthrow of Mubarak, himself an ex-military commander. It has a long history of animosity toward the Muslim Brotherhood, which is Egypt's most organized political party.

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 29, 2013 11:14 AM
It can only get worse to get better. Maybe this is what the Muslim Brotherhood is looking for and really deserves. If the Muslim Brotherhood was truly a patriotic Egyptian outfit, it would have called off the protests to protect lives and allow Egypt to start back on its feet again. But no. It's either the brotherhood rules or there is no Egypt. Too bad for a party that wants to rule the country. But Egypt must move forward, and the error of 2012 must be corrected. The Muslim Brotherhood was hiding behind democracy to deny Egyptians rights - that is all they know about democracy - a system that foisted Morsi mayhem on the people of Egypt. Revolution is all about correcting perceived error(s) by force. When the error is instituted by a system that is supposed to eliminate it, then it becomes a reason for another/counter revolution. The army should not relent to lend credible support to the populace in their hard times of trial until true democracy is achieved, unless there is something like Muslim Brotherhood democracy - which is practiced in Gaza, Southern Lebanon, Iran and Saudi Arabia where the the rule of law is sharia and death for others.

by: Me
July 28, 2013 5:27 PM
More shameful "reporting" from VOA, yeah don't mention Human Rights Watch clear condemnation of the latest massacre and of the targeted killings mentioned by medical sources, just mention the military junta propaganda which obviously killed tens of civilian demonstrators with "tear gas"... Lamentable damage control propaganda for the US funded military junta...

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