News / USA

Convention Draws Variety of Interests, Characters

Stephen Kimel and his wife Greta Kimel attract costumers to take pictures at their photo booth which was set-up at a street festival for convention goers ahead of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 3, 2012.
Stephen Kimel and his wife Greta Kimel attract costumers to take pictures at their photo booth which was set-up at a street festival for convention goers ahead of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 3, 2012.
CHARLOTTE — U.S. Democrats are holding their national convention in Charlotte, North Carolina this week to formally nominate President Barack Obama for a second four-year term in office.  Modern political conventions mainly serve as a vehicle to build party unity close to the election.  But they also draw activists, special interest groups and assorted personalities from across the country, many with their own agendas. 

The Democrats are in town this week and the streets of Charlotte are filled with characters.

Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina

DAY ONE: The Charlotte in 2012 Host Committee holds 'CarolinaFest 2012,' a family-friendly, Labor Day celebration and convention week kick-off event open to the public

DAY TWO: Democratic National Convention Chair Antonio Villaraigosa officially begins the proceedings. Committees determine the agenda and conduct Democratic Party business

DAY THREE: Delegates vote for the Democratic Party candidate for president

DAY FOUR: President Barack Obama will accept the Democratic nomination at an outdoor stadium. The event is open to the public
As delegates file by, Christian street preacher Justin Edwards says it is time for them to make a choice.

“Which hand will you fall in?  Will you fall into His right of judgment or will you fall into His left hand of love?,” he said.

Edwards is one of several street preachers, organized by Scott Smith of Florida, who attend high-profile events like the conventions and the recent Olympic Games in London.

“It's a little bit of an exercise of freedom of speech and freedom of religion, and thankfully in this country we still have those rights,” he said.

A short distance away, Daniel Robertson is trying to sell a program about the Democratic convention filled with pictures of President Obama.

Robertson had little luck trying to sell the same merchandise to Republicans last week at their convention.  For obvious reasons he is having a lot more success with the Democratic crowd in Charlotte.

“I was actually in Florida for the Republican convention and this is like a carnival compared to what was there.  This is great.  So many friendly people and the atmosphere is wonderful,” he said.

  • President Barack Obama waves after his speech at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 6, 2012.
  • Vice President Joe Biden and President Barack Obama wave to the delegates at the conclusion of President Obama's speech at the Democratic National Convention, September 6, 2012.
  • President Barack Obama and First lady Michelle Obama joined by their children Sasha, left, and Malia walks across the stage after President Obama's speech to the Democratic National Convention.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama (L) embraces former President Bill Clinton onstage after Clinton nominated Obama for re-election during the second session of Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 5, 2012
  • U.S. President Barack Obama (L) joins former President Bill Clinton onstage after Clinton nominated Obama for re-election during the second session of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 5, 2012.
  • Former President Bill Clinton addresses the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina, September 5, 2012
  • First Lady Michelle Obama waves after addressing the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 3, 2012.
  • Delegates cheer as First lady Michelle Obama addresses the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Delegates recite the Pledge of Allegiance at the opening of the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • A woman records the invocation at the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Delegates await the start of the first day of the convention, September 4, 2012.
  • A group of third grade students rehearse saying the Pledge of Allegiance ahead of the first day of the convention in Time Warner Cable Arena, September 4, 2012.
  • Advertisements for the DNC line the walls at the Charlotte Douglas International Airport.
  • Protesters block an intersection near the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina for several hours while surrounded by police who allow the demonstration to continue, September 4, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Delegates tour the floor ahead of the convention, September 3, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Programs laid out for guests inside the convention center. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • The Charlotte, North Carolina skyline seen through the window of an airplane, September 2, 2012.
  • President Barack Obama's campaign manager Jim Messina tours the floor at the Democratic National Convention, September 3, 2012.
  • Delegates and Democratic National Convention visitors crowd one of the merchandise stores in Charlotte, September 3, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Delegates await the start of the first day of the Democratic National Convention, September 4, 2012.
  • A 15-ton sand sculpture of President Obama is on display outside the convention. The sand comes from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. (J. Featherly/VOA)

Others are on a more serious mission this week in Charlotte.  Sleeter Dover is a Democratic delegate from the western state of Wyoming.

Dover is a 65-year-old African American who grew up in segregated South Carolina, not far from Charlotte.  Dover has searing memories of those early years, including the time his sister was jailed for trying to integrate a local bowling alley.

Dover never thought he would see that day nearly four years ago when Barack Obama became the first African American president.  Dover is aware that enthusiasm for the president is down a bit from 2008 but he says he is driven to help Mr. Obama win a second term in November.

“We don't need enthusiasm.  We need a good memory and determination, and that's enough for us,” he said.

Older African Americans in particular saw Barack Obama's election as a watershed moment in U.S. history, an event that validated a decades-long struggle for equal rights.

Sleeter Dover says he has a personal investment in Obama's re-election in November.

“If not, I see this country headed in a direction back to the days when I grew up in rural South Carolina, and I don't know about everybody else, but I'm not going back!,” he said.

The Obama campaign is counting on a strong turnout in November from African American voters, by far the president's most loyal group of supporters.

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