News / Science & Technology

Developing Countries Want Rich Nations to Pay for Climate Change

Tropical Storm Aere pounds the Philippines. Developing nations want industrialized countries to increase funding to help them cope with the effects of climate change, including rising sea levels and more violent storms.
Tropical Storm Aere pounds the Philippines. Developing nations want industrialized countries to increase funding to help them cope with the effects of climate change, including rising sea levels and more violent storms.
Rosanne Skirble
The United Nations climate talks in Doha, Qatar, continued into their second week, Wednesday, as delegates from nearly 200 countries struggle to craft a replacement for the Kyoto Protocol, the global agreement on climate change that expires at the end of this month.

The negotiations are deadlocked over demands by poorer nations for financial help in coping with climate change.

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called on delegates at the United Nations Conference on Climate Change to speed up their work on an agreement to address a warming planet.

“Let us be under no illusion, this is a crisis, a threat to us all, our economies, our security and the well-being of our children and those who will come after," he said. "No one is immune to climate change, rich or poor.”
United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon wants delegates at the UN Conference on Climate Change in Doha to speed up their work on an agreement.United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon wants delegates at the UN Conference on Climate Change in Doha to speed up their work on an agreement.
x
United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon wants delegates at the UN Conference on Climate Change in Doha to speed up their work on an agreement.
United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon wants delegates at the UN Conference on Climate Change in Doha to speed up their work on an agreement.


Delegates from nearly 200 countries - rich and poor - are in Doha to extend the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 global climate change agreement that expires at the end of this month, and to begin to forge a new agreement to replace it.

Two issues block the way forward.  Developing countries are demanding that industrialized nations fulfill their pledges under Kyoto to reduce their climate-changing industrial emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, and to put new, larger emission curbs on the table. 
Developing Countries Want Industrialized Nations to Pay for Climate Change
Doha Climate Talks Wedi
|| 0:00:00
...
 
🔇
X

The developing nations, led by China, are also insisting that rich nations provide more aid to poorer countries to help them cope with the effects of climate change, including rising sea levels and more violent storms. 

In Doha Wednesday, Tim Gore, a climate change policy advisor for Oxfam International, a confederation of groups working on social justice issues, applauded efforts by England, Germany and Sweden to increase their climate aid and expects other nations to follow. 

“Those announcements are truly welcome.  And they shine a spotlight on those that have remained silent: the U.S., Canada, Japan, even Australia," Gore said. "But we need to be very clear as well that those types of announcements made in press conferences can be no substitute for clear commitments in the text that poor countries have come here to negotiate.”

According to Gore, poor countries need funds to help them switch to cleaner energy sources and to adapt to a warmer world.

“We need at a bare minimum to know that the public finance that the developed countries are providing to poor countries to fight climate change increases next year," he said, "and keeps increasing every year until we reach $100 billion by 2020, $100 billion per year by 2020.”

At U.N. Climate talks in 2009, delegates agreed that money would go into a Green Climate Fund. Gore says so far, the biggest players - the United States and the European Union - have not resolved exactly how they will provide the promised dollars. But a U.S. negotiator in Doha says the Obama Administration continues to support climate finance.

United Nations Secretary General United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon urged delegates do resolve the issue. 

“For the simple reason that it affects all people increasingly and profoundly. If we act together with a clear purpose, we can meet the challenge," he said. "But we need to be united, governments from all regions, businesses, and civil societies. We have a clear choice: stand together or fall together.””

Ban has been meeting with a group of key countries to emphasize the importance of an agreement on long-term financing. The U.N. Secretary-General said Wednesday that he plans to convene a high-level meeting in 2014 aimed at speeding sluggish international efforts to combat climate change.
                                                                                                                                      
The U.N. climate change talks in Doha end Friday.

You May Like

China Investigates Former Powerful Security Chief

Former security chief and member of Politburo Standing Committee, Zhou Yongkang, under investigation for suspected 'serious disciplinary violation' More

India, US Look to Reset Ties During Kerry Visit

This week's talks will be first high level interaction between two countries since Prime Minister Narendra Modi took charge More

Video Young African Leadership Program Renamed to Honor Mandela

YALI program, launched by President Obama in 2010, aims to build skills in business, entrepreneurship, public management and civic leadership More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid