News / Middle East

Damascus Bombing Kills Three of Assad's Top Aides

Syria Falls Into Chaos After Top Military Officials Killedi
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Jeff Seldin
July 18, 2012 9:44 PM
A bombing Wednesday in the Syrian capital killed several top Syrian military officials. At least one opposition group has claimed responsibility. There are reports of mass military defections, large protests, and clashes between rebels and government forces in Damascus and elsewhere. VOA's Jeff Seldin reports from Washington.
VOA News
Syrian forces and rebels have clashed in several neighborhoods of Damascus, and helicopters are reported to have fired on targets from the air, after at least three top government officials died in a bomb attack Wednesday.

Syrian state television says a bomb exploded during a high-level meeting at the National Security building in the capital, killing Defense Minister Daoud Rajha and Deputy Defense Minister Assef Shawkat, brother-in-law of President Bashar al-Assad.

Syrian Ministers Killed in DamascusSyrian Ministers Killed in Damascus
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Syrian Ministers Killed in Damascus
Syrian Ministers Killed in Damascus
Syrian General Hassan Turkmani, a former defense minister, is also reported to have died of injuries from the bombing.

Syrian Bombing Victims Served in Top Military Roles

  • Defense Minister Daoud Rajha, the most senior government official killed in the Syrian conflict. The 65-year-old former army general also was the most senior Christian government official in Syria.  Appointed last August, he was one of the prominent minority figures used by President Assad's government as an example of diversity in the military and security services otherwise dominated by Alawites. The attack on General Rajha is the first assassination of a prominent official in the 16-month uprising against Assad.
  • Assef Shawkat, President Assad's brother in-law, was a major general and deputy defense minister, as well as deputy chief of staff of security.  Part of Mr. Assad’s inner family circle,  he was married to the president's elder sister, Bushra.
  • General Hassan Turkmani, a former defense minister, was responsible for crisis operations.  A Sunni Muslim, he added sectarian diversity to Syria's military-intelligence establishment, which is dominated by Assad's Alawite community.
  • The explosion also seriously wounded other senior government officials, including Interior Minister Mohammed Shaar, the former commander of the military police.
The rebel Free Syrian Army has claimed responsibility for the bombing. Reuters news agency reports the rebel group Liwa al-Islam also claimed responsibility.

The Syrian military has named Armed Forces Chief of Staff Fahed al-Jasem el-Freij as the new defense minister and vowed to "continue fighting terrorism."

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says close to 100 people were killed in anti-government unrest across Syria on Wednesday, including 18 in Damascus.

Security Council Postpones Resolution Vote

The United Nations Security Council has postponed a vote on a resolution that would extend its observer mission in Syria.

Council President Nestor Osorio, Colombia's U.N. ambassador, says the vote has been pushed back to Thursday. He says diplomats are hoping for an agreement that is acceptable to all sides.

The Council has been divided about whether a new resolution should include a threat of sanctions against President Assad's government. Britain, France, Germany and the United States are pushing for a 45-day renewal of the mission in Syria along with a threat of sanctions.

Russia has promised to veto that version. Its proposal calls for a longer extension of the mission, but no sanctions. China has backed Russia in blocking previous Western-backed resolutions calling for tough action on Syria.

The mission's mandate expires Friday.

U.S. Reacts to Bombing, Imposes Sanctions

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says the bombing shows Syria's crisis is "rapidly spinning out of control."

The White House said the attack made it clear that President Assad was losing control, violence was increasing instead of decreasing and the international community needs to come together to support a political transition.

  • Smoke rises over the skyline in the Qaboun neighborhood of Damascus, Syria, during shelling by Syrian government forces, July 19, 2012.
  • A burnt car in the al-Midan neighborhood in Damascus, July 20, 2012.
  • A burnt car in the al-Midan neighborhood in Damascus, July 20, 2012.
  • Jordanians and Syrians living in Jordan hold pictures of President Bashar al-Assad and shout slogans against the Syrian Revolution during a demonstration near the Syrian embassy in Amman July 19, 2012.
  • This image made from amateur video released by the Ugarit News and accessed July 18, 2012, purports to show burning tires in Damascus, Syria.
  • This image made from amateur video released by the Shaam News Network and accessed July 18, 2012, purports to show a burning Syrian military tank in Damascus, Syria.
  • An image taken from Syrian television shows Syrian security forces taking position during armed clashes with gunmen in the Al-Midan district of Damascus, July 18, 2012.
  • This image made from amateur video released by the Ugarit News and accessed July 18, 2012, purports to show Free Syrian Army soldiers during clashes with Syrian government forces at Tadamon Police Station in Damascus, Syria.
  • Journalists wait at al-Rawda Square, near a road that leads to the national security building where a bomb killed at least three top aides to President Assad, after access to the area was blocked in Damascus July 18, 2012.
  • Men celebrate in the Lebanese town of Tripoli on July 18, 2012, after an attack in Damascus killed the Syria's defense minister, General Daoud Rajha.
  • General Fahad Jassim al-Freij is seen in this handout released by Syria's national news agency SANA on July 18, 2012. Syria appointed Freij as defense minister, replacing Daoud Rajha, killed in an attack.
  • In this image released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Fahd Jassem al-Freij, Syria's new defense minister, reads a statement after he was appointed by President Bashar Assad on July 18, 2012.
  • Assef Shawkat, brother-in-law of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, who was assassinated in Damascus, stands during the funeral of late president Hafez al-Assad in this June 13, 2000 photo.

Just hours after the attack, the U.S. announced it was widening sanctions on Syria.

The Treasury Department announced it had imposed penalties on 29 Syrian officials and five companies with ties to Syria's weapons program.

The sanctions will freeze any assets the officials may have in U.S. territories and prohibit Americans from doing business with them.

World Reaction

British Foreign Secretary William Hague said the bombing indicates the situation in Syria is "deteriorating rapidly," while German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the attack shows there is an "urgent" need for a new United Nations resolution on Syria.

France said the attack underscores the "urgent" need to "find a political transition."

Russia said a "decisive battle" is underway in Syria. However, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov warned that adopting a U.N. resolution with sanctions would amount to direct support of rebels.

Iran condemned the bombing and urged foreign powers against what it calls interference in Syria’s domestic affairs. According to the state-run IRNA news agency, Iran’s foreign ministry said foreign “interference” and weapons shipments into Syria have played a role in what it called “terrorist moves in the country.”

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon met Wednesday with Chinese leaders in Beijing, where he expressed hope that the Security Council will unite to help end the bloodshed in Syria and help the country's people begin working toward a Syrian-led transition.

"[I am] deeply concerned and sometimes I cannot sleep when I think of so many people being killed every day, even today and yesterday, hundred and 200 people have been killed," said Ban. "This must stop at any cost so that Syrian people can commence immediately [a] dialogue for political resolution of this issue, reflecting the genuine aspiration and genuine needs of people."

China's official People's Daily newspaper ran a commentary Tuesday rejecting foreign intervention in the Syrian crisis.

Syrian Government Launches Crackdown

Syria’s State-run SANA news agency says armed forces units “chased down terrorists” who had “infiltrated” the Midan neighborhood in Damascus, on Wednesday, killing and arresting a “large number of them.”

The report also says clashes erupted in the flashpoint Homs region after an “armed terrorist group” attacked security forces in several villages.

The Syrian government has blamed much of the anti-government related violence on armed groups or terrorists.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Fabien from: DRC
July 19, 2012 10:37 AM
The situation is so hard in Syria, innoncent people are killed, fled, desplaced for nothing. Cause of disparity of opinion in this conflict is interest fro members of security council who have right to veto. It is sad to note that the situation in field is deterioted day after day. Many incident, building destroyed ; no water, no food, no sanitation and so on. I would like to knwon after killing all people, what do officials govern next? President Asad does not has a compassion for syrian people.

In Response

by: Ali from: East Africa
August 04, 2012 2:45 AM
People of syria are not good when they use it to kills many syrian their own people and say allahu akbar that mean you are denying your self because position are using their people to kills. this is not way i believed that oposition group are not Muslim, the way they acting and killing their own people it is not matter of situation it matter power beseeching. i am a African Muslim body but muslim it should not do like that


by: JC from: USA
July 18, 2012 9:18 PM
Isaiah 17:1
The burden of Damascus. Behold, Damascus is taken away from being a city, and it shall be a ruinous heap.


by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
July 18, 2012 9:09 PM
really dont understand why USA has always to support terrorism? Isn't 911 enough lesson to you?
Shame on USA!


by: Mike
July 18, 2012 4:34 PM
The Assad` throne shakes and cracking more and more and Russia has no chance to save his friend. Putin has always been narrow-minded politician, but now Putin is just a fool. He supports a regime that will die soon.This Putin policy removed Russia from the Middle East, where not only the Syrians, but the rest of the Arab world increasingly hates the Russian state.


by: Laisha from: USA
July 18, 2012 10:49 AM
I guess that is the end of the Syria "diversity" program... but the funniest reaction is that of old Merkel - "there is an "urgent" need for a "new" United Nations resolution on Syria... send more "observers" - i love it... yeah, let us sit down, relax, have a cold beer and "observe"... hey Arabs, isn't it nice to know what the world thinks of you...???

In Response

by: Anonymous
July 18, 2012 5:46 PM
The surest way to avoid international prosecution for grave human rights crimes is to fake your death. The current regime in Syria will fall and Assad will not be prosecuted for the ongoing human rights violations because he is backed by Russia and China. However, his top government and military leaders will have answer to the international community.


by: Mansoor Mehdi from: Pakistan
July 18, 2012 10:43 AM
This style of Blast shows that cia is fully involved in Damascus, like these suiside blast are common in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia and other countries where US is involved. its US style.


by: Codee from: UK
July 18, 2012 9:56 AM
why do they all have misshapen heads...??? just an observation... still, they are ugly though


by: Rob from: UK
July 18, 2012 9:44 AM
hey we learned to distrust anything that comes from the "official Syrian Ministry of Propaganda..." who still maintain that Assad is fighting "foreign Terrorists..." so, if they say it was a "suicide" bomber... we know that it was really a Syrian military purge operation... with one of the Sunny donkeys "volunteering" as a suicide animal... hey, its Islam - and they are known to be doing these things to each other, and later, asking us for "Aid" or "financial help" the Palestinians have been doing that for years now... we learn... slowly... but we learn


by: Anonymous
July 18, 2012 9:02 AM
Hey Assad, if Syrian Defense Minister Gen. Daoud Rajha isn't safe I'd assume you wouldn't be safe at all. Your Defence Minister General should be your safest man, even safer than you. The FSA is making its way Assad, slowly but surely, have a nice day...


by: alan ban from: australia
July 18, 2012 6:16 AM
Basically the UN doesn,t exist in the eyes of the world,American government lead by G W Bush jr saw to that on the invasion of iraq.So what annan and his loser mates are doing is just getting paid for something that they have no power to stop, they should now get a real job or retire on their million dollar savings they have, they are no longer relevant ask american politicians

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