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    South Sudanese Leader Shortens China Trip

    South Sudan's President Salva Kiir Mayardit (L) and his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao toast during a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, April 24, 2012.
    South Sudan's President Salva Kiir Mayardit (L) and his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao toast during a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, April 24, 2012.

    South Sudan's President Salva Kiir is cutting short a trip to China because of what a Chinese official called "domestic issues."

    Kiir had planned to remain in the country until Saturday.  He met with the National People's Congress chairman Wu Bangguo Wednesday, who said it was unfortunate the South Sudanese leader would be leaving and canceling a trip to Shanghai.

    It was not clear when Kiir will depart China.  He held talks Tuesday with Chinese President Hu Jintao, and said Sudan's bombings of southern territory amount to a declaration of war against his country.  

    China has urged both sides to settle their issues through peaceful negotiations, and said it is sending an envoy to the region to promote talks.

    Tuesday, the United Nations Security Council called for an immediate end to fighting between Sudan and South Sudan.

    The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, said U.N. officials briefed the Security Council, noting that the withdrawal of South Sudanese troops (SPLA) from the oil town of Heglig was initially encouraging, but has resulted in increased bombings by Sudan.

    "Council members welcome the withdrawal from Heglig by the SPLA, demanded an immediate halt to aerial bombardments by the Sudanese Armed Forces and urged an immediate cease-fire and a return to the negotiating table," Rice said.

    The ambassador said the U.N. Mission in South Sudan confirmed the bombings in Unity state killed at least 16 civilians and injured 34 others.

    Tuesday, the African Union gave the two countries 90 days to settle their disputes over oil, citizenship and boundary issues or face binding international arbitration.  

    South Sudan's deputy defense minister, Majak D'Agoot said the next few days will be "crucial" to avoiding an all-out war.

    The White House condemned Sudan's military incursions into South Sudan, Tuesday.  White House spokesman Jay Carney said the United States calls on both governments to agree to an immediate cease-fire and recommit to negotiations.

    South Sudan's military has been sending reinforcements to the border with Sudan.  Military officials said they were preparing defensive positions to respond to any further provocation from Khartoum.

    Sudan and South Sudan have been on the edge of full-scale war after SPLA forces withdrew from Heglig, which they occupied for 10 days earlier this month.

    Juba claims the SPLA left the area in response to international pressure, while Khartoum claims it retook control by force.

    Sudan's president, Omar al-Bashir, visited Heglig Monday to demonstrate that the territory was under his forces' control.  

    The two sides had previously fought a 21-year civil war that killed more than 2 million people.  The war ended with a 2005 peace agreement that included an independence referendum for the south.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: SEBIT MALUAL
    April 26, 2012 5:26 PM
    I think that Arabs in North Sudan hates South Sudanese. South Sudanese need peace

    by: bellion
    April 26, 2012 3:10 AM
    so one day he says he takes orders from no one and is not moving until UN forces arrive,then suddenly he tells his troops to leave within three days,but some of them are back within three hours,the rest never returned.Let this be a lesson for any faggot trying to breach our 100 year old army.They will be crushed like cockroaches.And when we bring out our fighter planes the south doesn't have a chance. So keep your money for food and hospitals because you are fighting a hopeless war in your case.

    by: david lulasa
    April 26, 2012 2:16 AM
    hands off diplomacy is a failure,china should stop selling and giving weapons to its partners...partners need more food than weapons,and clashes will eventually cease.

    obama barack

    by: Meki
    April 25, 2012 10:47 PM
    Ammar, I was studyin in kht till mar 2012. S Sdn rebels r in Kalakala, Soba, Maigoma, Omdurman's block 15, Benk-akari areas inside. They work together with Sd security to forcibly conscript southerners. My cousin was chased by 3 Nuer militiamen in Haj Yusif Shigla. A neighbour was taken away at night with his 3 sons. 3 priests were kidnaped Nd released on bail. Sd gov gav 44 landcruisers mounted with guns to rebels I saw them. Many stories of ssd rebels I'm kht ...

    by: Boyear
    April 25, 2012 12:17 PM
    Sudan Government threats the Republic of South Sudan for war. Nothing is new about Al-Bashir craps that come out from his filthy mouth. We, South Sudanese will defend our Country by all means. The Hgilig oil field is ours. Khartoum’s war criminals have been taken our natural resources to fund their genocidal agenda for African origins in Darfur, Nubba Maintains, South Blue Nile and South Sudan. Together, let us fight for our survivable.

    by: Michael Kuayak
    April 25, 2012 9:10 AM
    Civillian in South Sudan are being killed again by the same culprit ( Omar Bashir) but the world turns a blind eye on them. When the young nations resilience army overran the well armed murderer of Sudan in Panthou, the UN Security Council pounded on South Sudan. Now the young nation acted infirmity with world, the UNSC fails to stop the aerial bombardment in South Sudan town of Bentiu. Pleas stop Omar El Bashir from dancing over corpes. He blonds in The Hague.

    by: Ammar
    April 25, 2012 9:07 AM
    Don't forget that S Sudan started the war by invading Hejleg, S Sudan also supports and encourage the Sudanese rebels.

    by: scott
    April 25, 2012 6:12 AM
    No one knows when and who will end this conflit! The UN? The AU?May be the world cop USA. We can not count on the sudans and south will stop the war by them self. The key piont is what kind of interests will lead the other country to press the both side of conflit to make the compromise! God bless you!

    by: .jacob bior
    April 25, 2012 5:31 AM
    I thinks the international community should know now who is the caused of all this problems south and Sudan. Sudan government is now looking forwards to invade south Sudan by all means. The international community should gave two options to Sudan . 1 stops bombardment and go back to the negotiations table or gaved no fly zones over south Sudan.

    by: John Musisi
    April 25, 2012 5:19 AM
    Bashir should be facing the ICC. Instead, the whole world is on its knees begging him to stop the senseless war against the new nation of S. Sudan. I don't see the ICC doesn't try criminals like Bashir in absentia and if found guilty, they are hunted down by all countries subscribing to ICC.

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