News / Middle East

Double Bombing Kills 18 in Iraq

A man inspects the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad, June 8, 2014.
A man inspects the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad, June 8, 2014.
VOA News
Iraqi officials say a double bombing outside a Kurdish party office has killed at least 18 people and wounded more than 65 others.

Sunday's blasts, including a suicide attack, occurred near an office of President Jalal Talabani's Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) party, which is near a security forces building.

The second bomb went off as emergency workers came to the scene of the first blast.

There has been no claim of responsibility for the attack, which struck northeast of Baghdad in the town of Jalula in Diyala province.

Iraq is facing some of its worst violence in several years, with nearly 800 people killed in May alone, the highest monthly total of the year.

On Saturday, a series of car bombings killed nearly 60 people in the Iraqi capital, part of a day of violence that saw militants attack an Iraqi university.

The blasts in Baghdad targeted mainly Shi'ite areas, underscoring the sectarian violence that has been on the rise in Iraq.

Elsewhere, heavy fighting between militants and security forces raged a second day in the northern city of Mosul.  Officials say 38 militants and 21 police officers died in the clashes.  

In Iraq's western province of Anbar, gunmen attacked a university and took dozens of students and staff members hostage before security forces led an assault to retake the campus.  The hostages were freed and taken by buses from the school.  

Police say militants began the attack by killing three guards at the gate of Anbar University in the city of Ramadi. There are conflicting reports on other casualties and on whether security forces or militants remain in control of the university.

There has been no claim of responsibility for Saturday's assault in Ramadi, although the group called Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant has carried out many attacks in recent months.

The group remains in control of the city of Fallujah and parts of Ramadi, the provincial capital.

On Friday, the U.N. refugee agency said about 480,000 people have fled their homes since fighting escalated between Shi'ite-led government forces and Sunni rebels in Anbar early this year.

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by: MUSTAFA from: INDIA
June 08, 2014 10:51 PM
This is the act of Al Qaida and its subsidiary very well finance & equip by Saudi Arabia. Al Qaida and its branches is Terrorist Group whose Main Aim to kill fellow Muslim & Other peoples. They feel pleasure to see human being in tear and pain. Al Qaida cannot build school, hospital and other social work. Main aim of Al Qaida and its sponsor to create as much as possible suffering to human being. I do not know who issue confirm ticket to Al Qaida to go to paradise by killing fellow Muslim and other human beings. Very sad constitution.


by: Not Again from: Canada
June 08, 2014 9:31 AM
Once again terrible crimes are being committed in Iraq, and once again the Kurdish people are under attack and full persecution. This is the dastardly legacy of the empires, that notwithstanding they promissed a Kurdish homeland, during WWI but never delivered. This dastardly legacy of the administrative imperial borders continues to have its terrible consequences. It is unfortunate, that the US Bush administration continued supporting the unified state of Iraq, which should have never existed; Iraq should have been split into the three distinct independent countries, amongst them the the Kurdish state; much like much of the Balkans, Iraq is not a sustainable unitarian state, the three constituent people just do not want, nor can they, live together in one state. Syria is much the same situation. Unity in these contries can only exist alongside massive continuous bloodshed, and a terrible dictatorship.
The imperial colonial administrative borders have created these areas of massive continuous bloodshed, which we see in many countries, especially in Asia and Africa, but even in Europe, lastest case Ukraine an administrative border problem created by the dastardly Soviet empire.

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