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    On Greek Islands, Doubts Grow Over EU-Turkey Migrant Deal

    On Greek Islands, Doubts Grow Over EU-Turkey Migrant Deali
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    March 20, 2016 1:48 PM
    The deal struck between the European Union and Turkey to try to stem the flow of refugees comes into force Sunday. New arrivals in Greece will be returned to Turkey – with the EU then taking the same number of Syrian refugees from camps on Turkish territory. But as Henry Ridgwell reports from the Greek island of Lesbos, where most of the refugees arrive, there is growing anger at what’s seen as an immoral and unworkable deal.
    Henry Ridgwell

    The deal struck between the European Union and Turkey to try to stem the flow of refugees comes into force Sunday, meaning new arrivals in Greece will be returned to Turkey – with the EU then taking the same number of Syrian refugees from camps on Turkish territory.

    But on the Greek island of Lesbos, where most of the refugees arrive, there is growing anger at what’s seen as an immoral and unworkable deal.

    A few kilometers off the coast, NATO warships and Turkish coast guard vessels patrol up and down the straits between Lesbos and Turkey. Helicopters watch from the skies. Europe and Ankara are trying to prevent a surge of refugees as the new deal comes into force.

    Refugees line up for food at Piraeus port, Athens, Greece, March 17, 2016.
    Refugees line up for food at Piraeus port, Athens, Greece, March 17, 2016.

    Shoreline vigil

    On the Lesbos shoreline, volunteers continue their round-the-clock vigil on the lookout for migrant boats.

    “I don’t think that political decisions make a big difference for the refugees, they will come anyway. They are still willing, because they are on their trip for months or years, so they will try it,” said Samuel Radber, from the Swiss Cross volunteer group.

    Like most aid workers here, Radber is scathing of the agreement between Brussels and Ankara.

    “You can’t charge people like you do with goats or money. They are not numbers, they are human beings. So you can’t say ‘we send one back and take another to Europe.’ That’s not the way it works,” he said.

    Several days of poor weather have prevented many boats from making the crossing. But rescue teams here believe there are hundreds, if not thousands of refugees waiting to set off.

    New arrivals are transferred by bus to other refugee camps in Athens, Greece, March 17, 2016.
    New arrivals are transferred by bus to other refugee camps in Athens, Greece, March 17, 2016.

    Nearly 2,000 arrested

    Turkish police say they arrested over 1,700 migrants Saturday along the coastline, along with 16 alleged smugglers.

    Greece is continuing to move migrants off the islands to the mainland. 
    Somali refugee Abdi Yare Mousseh was waiting to take the ferry to the city of Kavala Saturday.

    "I know a lot of friends in Istanbul who need to come," Mousseh said. "But it is not easy, it is very hard. Some people are crying. Some people are in the jail. Me, six days arrested by Turkish police. He took photos and fingerprints. [Then] I tried to come again [to Lesbos].”

    Rumors are circulating across the refugee camps of deportations to Turkey dependent on nationality. 

    Despite assurances from Brussels of fair treatment for refugees, on the frontline of the crisis there are doubts the plan is either workable or legal.

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    by: 1worldnow from: Earth
    March 20, 2016 10:44 PM
    Oh, and to add a little more about Europeans and their hypocrisy towards America for trying to stop the illegal Mexicans, here's another tidbit for you to enjoy. So you Eurocratic supremacists insisted that America do something to help the illegals, not deport them, support them, help them, give them shelter, give them money, give them health care, school their children, give them food..............all for FREEEEEEE!!!!!! But you should try this, since you Erotrashies think the USA has it wrong: you say wall are bad, OK, then tear down the walls in your homes. You say doors of opportunity should be open for all, then open all your doors and let everyone know they are welcome, anytime, to just come into your homes and HELP THEMSELVES!!!!!!

    by: 1worldnow from: Earth
    March 20, 2016 10:38 PM
    Now that the Europeans are dealing with an issue that they themselves were against the Republicans in the USA for trying to do something about the illegal Mexicans, Europeans are singing a different tune. Does this mean that Europe will start supporting the Republicans in the USA? Well, the simple answer is, of course, NO! I'll tell you why. Europe has been enjoying decades of peace and prosperity. Sitting on its high-horse, and telling the rest of the world how life should be. Now that they are having to eat their own garbage, they are crying foul. You people chastised the USA for trying to stop the illegal Mexicans, but look at you, all high-and-mighty, why won't you let the LEGAL migrants/refugees in? Huh? Would it be OK if the migrants were Christian? Yep. You know I am right. It's because of that ridiculous religion called Islam. Haha, deal with it!!!!!

    by: Marcus Aurelius II from: NJ USA
    March 20, 2016 9:07 PM
    Many of these people are fleeing to save their lives. Some are economic migrants looking for a better life. Some are criminals or terrorists looking to take advantage of the confusion and blend in with the hordes. Europe does not seem to me to have any rational plan to deal with this. Nor does anyone else. What should America do? Be very careful. Think before you act. Check who will come, how many can be absorbed and at what rate, Also make it clear to them that they will have to conform to our laws and cultural norms when they get here. If there's any doubt about certain individuals, don't take chances, there are more than enough others who will accept our very reasonable terms.

    by: Karen Przytulski
    March 20, 2016 12:52 PM
    Middle Eastern beliefs and values and behaviors are not compatible with Western society. First and foremost we believe in the rule of law. When refugees have broken our laws, they ruined the path for future refugees. Secondly, we sterns believe in equality between men and women. Attacks by males on females and children further ruined future refugees acceptance. Third, the disposal of trash and food scraps exacerbates non-acceptance. Fourth, when Western laws are in conflict with Eastern religious beliefs, they disrequard our laws. Fifth, Easterners do not have the same work ethic as Westerners. They believe they are entitled to free health care, luxury food, WIFI, education, and housing. This has created increased resentment among Westerners many who have worked long hours to educate their own children.

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